Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Racism Hurts  (Read 22334 times)

LawNOrder

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Racism Hurts
« Reply #80 on: December 29, 2006, 11:49:43 PM »

You can definitely think in these terms .. I mean, in Nazi Germany you had no chance whatsoever to rise in prominence if you're Jew, even if you supported Hitler's views 110% .. Any Jew Nazi Party members, anyone?


Wow, interesting username, pixelaw!

my stepson my lover

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 9
    • View Profile
Re: Racism Hurts
« Reply #81 on: May 31, 2007, 06:51:43 AM »

"Change Your Life," Not the System: The Full Effect

Oprah's usefulness in fueling white racism denial goes beyond the fact that she is one of the richest people in the world -- sufficiently wealthy to periodically hand out millions of dollars worth of consumer goodies to hundreds of assembled middle-class white women in her studio audience. The full toxic "Oprah effect" is also about the how of her ascendancy. Like Powell, Rice, and perhaps now Obama, Oprah is perceived by many whites as succeeding because she's "not all that black," as Powell once described himself: because she has absorbed dominant white middle- and upper-class "self-help" values and rejects the supposedly obsolete and dysfunctional effort to make white America face up to -- and pay for -- its racist structures, policies, and practices, past and present. 

It's a carefully cultivated perception. With her army of disproportionately white counselors, personal trainers, fitness consultants, personal chefs, massage therapists, interior designers, and New Age healers, Oprah has taken an "inner journey" toward primarily personal healing and accountability and away from the collective struggle for racial equality and social justice.  "The other kids were all into black power," Oprah told the Tribune in the mid-1980s. But "I wasn't a dashiki kind of woman ... Excellence was the best deterrent to racism and that became my philosophy." As her programming became ever more racially "sanitized" during the 1990s, Elaine Brown notes (in her excellent book The Condemnation of Little B), Oprah's emphasis focused on "providing ... comfort to what became her core audience of white women, in the form of 'lifestyle' and glamour 'makeovers,' diets, and New Age self-healing readings and practices and endless self-deprecating discourse over her own weight and 'nappy' hair."  "Winfrey carefully avoided using her unparalleled power and voice on behalf of black women," Brown bitterly observes, "even as the political agenda pounded poor black women and their children ever deeper into poverty and degradation." 

Oprah Winfrey is a whore. Well, at least.


Amen!

jillibean

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 874
  • I'm the pretty one.
    • View Profile
Re: Racism Hurts
« Reply #82 on: May 31, 2007, 09:08:07 AM »
No matter how great you do or how far you come there will always be some people out there who see one thing- your skin. Racism does hurt, but don't let it bother you- you can't change their feelings and you can't take back the moment anyway
UMiami c/o 2010

cashonly

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
A Judge’s $54 Million Lawsuit Against Dry Cleaners, Day 2
« Reply #83 on: June 30, 2007, 06:21:17 PM »


Roy Pearson (pictured), the D.C. administrative law judge who sued his dry cleaners for allegedly losing a pair of pants, asking for $54 million in damages.

Pearson accuses Custom Dry Cleaners of returning him the wrong pair of pants and breaking its promises to him because of signs that hung in the store which said "Same Day Service" and "Satisfaction Guaranteed." The trial began on June 13.

Pearson said yesterday that "there is no case in the District of Columbia or in the United States that comes anywhere close to the outrageousness of the behavior of the defendants in this case." When on cross-examination the lawyer for Custom Dry Cleaners asked Pearson, "Without regard to the law, as a human being, as a person, don’t you think it makes sense to interpret merchant signage in a reasonable way?," Pearson responded, "No."

Then, Judge Judith Bartnoff asked Pearson the following hypothetical, according to the WaPo: If a customer demands $1,000 for a lost garment and the merchant truly believes the customer is lying, does a "Satisfaction Guaranteed" sign require the shop owner to hand over a check? "Yes," Pearson said.

The judge said she wouldn't issue a decision until next week. Stay tuned.


landrover06

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: Racism Hurts
« Reply #84 on: July 01, 2007, 10:25:01 PM »
Just yesterday, I was very happy with my life. Great job, great family, great friends, house ... But then something happened last night which completely changed my world. I was at a bar in West Hollywood where I got into a verbal argument with a blonde lady (she started it, I'm serious -- instead of saying 'excuse me', she just pushed me out of her way!). Now you know, two people at a bar, you know, tipsy, so an argument or two, not a big deal.

But what was different about this situation was that one of the involved parties (me) had dark skin. Just as I was about to walk away from the scene, the lady whispered this in my ear: "Why don't you go back to your county? We don't need you here!" This was such a big reality slap on my face that I was in absolute shock for about 10 minutes. I can do the best in law school, get a job at a great law firm, drive a fancy car ... but in the end, some lady at a bar, who most likely hasn't even set foot in college, can make a racist comment and completely destroy my confidence.

Well, to make the long story short, I, after a long time, faced such open racism and it has definitely affected the image I hold of myself. All I can say to this lady is, watch out! I'm an attorney and have so much to lose. But sooner or later, you are going to make a similar comment to a guy who is at your level (i.e. has nothing to lose) and he will not walk away from the scene. I guarantee it!

Sweet Revenge--> On a happier note, I ran into this lady after the bar closed. She was getting into her, oh lets just say, "crap" mobile. I, along with my friend, laughed out lound and yelled, "hey, you may not need me, but you definitely need a new car." LOL.

Jesus Christ!  So trite and meaningless this story.  Life is too short for this.  You are crying because you have no shoes.  Imagine how people feel who have no feet.

Here's some rules to live by:

1) Racism will always exist.  Dark-skinned black people will catch the worst of it, so be prepared.

2) Be prepared.
3) You can't change people, only your reaction to them.
4) Racism will always exist in every form at every level.  Be versatile enough to navigate around or through it.
5) People treat you different because of your race, it's their problem, not yours.
6) We are in Dubya Dark Ages, where it is fashionable to be a redneck, a hillbilly, or a backwoods moron from Crawford, Tx.  Adjust your expectations accordingly.
7) The red states were wrong.
8) The blue states were right.
9) Kick yourself if you reside in a red state.  You get what you deserve.
10) Pat yourself on the back if you reside in a blue state.  Better, but not perfect.
11) Only you can create your own reality.

BKA

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 6
    • View Profile
Re: A Judge’s $54 Million Lawsuit Against Dry Cleaners, Day 2
« Reply #85 on: July 03, 2007, 09:34:00 PM »


Roy Pearson (pictured), the D.C. administrative law judge who sued his dry cleaners for allegedly losing a pair of pants, asking for $54 million in damages.

Pearson accuses Custom Dry Cleaners of returning him the wrong pair of pants and breaking its promises to him because of signs that hung in the store which said "Same Day Service" and "Satisfaction Guaranteed." The trial began on June 13.

Pearson said yesterday that "there is no case in the District of Columbia or in the United States that comes anywhere close to the outrageousness of the behavior of the defendants in this case." When on cross-examination the lawyer for Custom Dry Cleaners asked Pearson, "Without regard to the law, as a human being, as a person, don’t you think it makes sense to interpret merchant signage in a reasonable way?," Pearson responded, "No."

Then, Judge Judith Bartnoff asked Pearson the following hypothetical, according to the WaPo: If a customer demands $1,000 for a lost garment and the merchant truly believes the customer is lying, does a "Satisfaction Guaranteed" sign require the shop owner to hand over a check? "Yes," Pearson said.

The judge said she wouldn't issue a decision until next week. Stay tuned.



cashonly, you're so funny! ;)

spoons

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 6
    • View Profile
Re: Racism Hurts
« Reply #86 on: July 04, 2007, 10:10:02 PM »

Pearson's undergraduate degree was earned at Lake Forest College and his J.D. at Northwestern University School of Law. Upon graduation, he first taught at, then became assistant director of, the clinical program at the Georgetown University Law Center. Pearson passed the bar for the District of Columbia in 1978 and was admitted to the bar for the U.S. Supreme Court in 1985.

Washington DC lawyer Roy Pearson lost his $54 million lawsuit against his dry cleaner whom he claimed misplaced his pants. According to ABC News, Pearson, who represented himself in court, broke down and cried while questioning himself about the mental anguish of losing his pants. He claimed they cost $800.

The sad thing is that ol' Roy's a judge, who holds court to interpret the law for others, and he somehow believed that the law gave him the right to drag his local dry cleaners through court for two years and sue for an amount totalling over 80,000 pairs of the pants, which had a value of $800, as he gave it. And if that's not enough to believe Judge Pearson impeachable, how about his behavior on the stand? On the witness stand, Pearson broke down in tears and had to take a break from his testimony because he became too emotional while questioning himself about his experience with the missing trousers.

Those weren't pants... it was his woobie.

In his opening statement, Pearson came out swinging, telling the court, "Never before in recorded history have a group of defendants engaged in such misleading and unfair business practices." Repeatedly referring to himself as "we..." What is he - the queen?? Pearson sought to present himself as the leader of a class of tens of thousands, if not a half million people, consisting of local residents he believes are at risk of falling for such insidious business practices as posting "Satisfaction Guaranteed" and "Same Day Service" signs. Pearson said at one point in court filings that he planned to call 63 witnesses.

"Mr. Pearson, you are not 'we.' You are an 'I,'" Bartnoff told him.

Amen.

As Pearson explained the details of the missing pants, he struggled to get through his hour and a half of testimony, most of which concerned his credentials and his background. He became visibly emotional when he reached the point in the story in which he recounted a confrontation with Soo Chung from the dry cleaning store. "These are not my pants," he testified, and said he told her, "I have in my adult life, with one exception, never worn pants with cuffs." Pearson testified that Chung insisted, saying, "These are your pants." Pearson then rushed from the courtroom, overcome with emotion.

He rushed from the courtroom, overcome with emotion, over a pair of pants? And he presides over justice in court?? Hoo boy. I hope that's corrected as soon as possible.
 


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTB4AsHJQFg&mode=related&search=

laundry

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile

Victoria Principal

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Racism Hurts
« Reply #88 on: July 06, 2007, 07:11:57 AM »
Your talent is naming the trouble, fixing it takes time.

height

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
Re: Racism Hurts
« Reply #89 on: July 09, 2007, 07:52:32 PM »

The and Hispanic soldiers -- about 40 of them, there were about 90 men in the unit -- shot into the air. They wouldn't shoot at the villagers in the ditch. The soldiers collected people in three ditches and just began to shoot them. The blacks and Hispanics shot up in the air, but the mostly white, lower middle class soldiers -- the kids who join the Army Reserve today and National Guard looking for extra dollars -- those kind of kids did the killing.


It's really troubling to see the black/Hispanic soldiers being told by the mutilated white soldier he had been punished for not having the courage to "plug" the kid the next day as Calley ordered him to ... I bet they felt at that point in time twice as guilty as they did two days before!


WHAT?!