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Author Topic: Presidential Hopeful ...  (Read 48390 times)

CK

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Re: Presidential Hopeful ...
« Reply #190 on: March 31, 2008, 07:22:36 PM »




Your posts, Cleo, along with username, avatar and signature appear to be quite interesting!

call in

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God D a m n America
« Reply #191 on: April 01, 2008, 02:01:49 AM »
On the Sunday in 2003 when Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. shouted "God d a m n America" from the pulpit of Trinity United Church of Christ, he defined d a m n a t i o n as God's way of holding humanity accountable for its actions. Rattling off a litany of injustices imposed on minorities throughout the nation's history, Wright argued that God cannot be expected to bless America unless it changes for the better. Until that day, he said, God will hold the nation accountable.

And that's when Wright uttered the three words that have rocked Sen. Barack Obama's presidential campaign.

On the Sunday after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Wright preached on the "brutally honest" final verses of Psalm 137, which he said "spotlight the insanity of the cycle of violence." The sound bite taken from the sermon is something Wright on that day termed a "faith footnote," in which he used the phrase "chickens are coming home to roost" to sum up what U.S. diplomat Edward Peck had said in a TV interview. Malcolm X used the same phrase after President Kennedy's assassination. But a critique of foreign policy was not Wright's central topic.

Beyond that racy dig, however, the sermon sought to admonish members inclined to vote for Hillary Rodham Clinton because they thought a black candidate couldn't win. Wright likened their doubt to the doubt of Jesus' disciples who did not believe he could feed a crowd with five loaves and two fishes. Wright's recent comment that Hillary Clinton will never know what it feels like to be called the N-word also touched nerves. Rev. Frederick Haynes III, a Wright protege said, "People need to understand how profoundly painful that word is," he said. "It speaks to an experience. He came from a different time."
I am a {metaphor}. Actually, I am an {extended metaphor}.

see ya

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Re: Presidential Hopeful ...
« Reply #192 on: April 02, 2008, 03:37:19 PM »

[...] David Axelrod, Obama's top strategist, has already called Sen. Clinton and her campaign says she is fully vetted, but the truth is that she is a veteran of non-disclosure. [...]


diveroll, you meant "David Axelrod, Obama's top strategist, has already called Sen. Clinton and her campaign that say she's fully vetted, not truthful when the truth is that she is a veteran of non-disclosure," didn't you? 


Well, Obama has not only Axlerod, but also that idiotic Amber Lee Ettinger -- "the Obama girl." Lately she returned with another idiotic piece called 'Hillary, stop the attacks!'

http://weblogs.chicagotribune.com/news/politics/blog/2008/03/obama_girl_returns_hillary_sto.html
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nyt

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Re: God D a m n America
« Reply #193 on: April 05, 2008, 05:36:51 PM »

[...]

Beyond that racy dig, however, the sermon sought to admonish members inclined to vote for Hillary Rodham Clinton because they thought a black candidate couldn't win. Wright likened their doubt to the doubt of Jesus' disciples who did not believe he could feed a crowd with five loaves and two fishes. [...]


May sound funny but that's how you move people's hearts (not sarcastic).

self scripted star

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Re: Presidential Hopeful ...
« Reply #194 on: April 09, 2008, 04:51:17 PM »

On the Sunday in 2003 when Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. shouted "God d a m n America" from the pulpit of Trinity United Church of Christ, he defined d a m n a t i o n as God's way of holding humanity accountable for its actions. Rattling off a litany of injustices imposed on minorities throughout the nation's history, Wright argued that God cannot be expected to bless America unless it changes for the better. Until that day, he said, God will hold the nation accountable.

And that's when Wright uttered the three words that have rocked Sen. Barack Obama's presidential campaign.

On the Sunday after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Wright preached on the "brutally honest" final verses of Psalm 137, which he said "spotlight the insanity of the cycle of violence." The sound bite taken from the sermon is something Wright on that day termed a "faith footnote," in which he used the phrase "chickens are coming home to roost" to sum up what U.S. diplomat Edward Peck had said in a TV interview. Malcolm X used the same phrase after President Kennedy's assassination. But a critique of foreign policy was not Wright's central topic.

Beyond that racy dig, however, the sermon sought to admonish members inclined to vote for Hillary Rodham Clinton because they thought a black candidate couldn't win. Wright likened their doubt to the doubt of Jesus' disciples who did not believe he could feed a crowd with five loaves and two fishes. Wright's recent comment that Hillary Clinton will never know what it feels like to be called the N-word also touched nerves. Rev. Frederick Haynes III, a Wright protege said, "People need to understand how profoundly painful that word is," he said. "It speaks to an experience. He came from a different time."




Obama is in a bit of a pickle here, and he'll need all of oratory skills to provide the context he says is now missing from media characterizations of his church and Rev. Wright. Because the last thing Obama needs as he speaks of post-racial politics are questions parsing his response to a flame-throwing preacher. Here's what Obama said today on the campaign trail in Pennsylvania about what he'll be saying tomorrow in Philly:

Quote
"I am going to be talking about, not just Rev. Wright, but just the larger issue of race in this campaign, which ramped up over the last couple of weeks. So I don't want to give a full preview ... But as I said in my statement, the statements that were the source of controversy from Rev. Wright were wrong and I strongly condemn them. I think the caricature that is being painted of him is not accurate and so part of what I'll do tomorrow is talk a little bit about how some of these issues are perceived from within the black church community, for example, which I think views this very differently."

Sounds like Obama is aiming for nuance that better be mighty hard to achieve on an issue that has generated as much heat as race in American history.

sequel

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Re: Presidential Hopeful My @ # ! * i n g Ass ..
« Reply #195 on: April 09, 2008, 05:35:59 PM »

Obama first come out in favor of full marriage equality for same-sex couples but then (with just a little pressure from fundamentalists) he betrayed that position to evangelize his "faith" and knuckle under to homophobic African-American Christian fundamentalists. He then denied his original position and not so magnanimously (but very patronizingly) casually tossed over the insult of the "separate but [not] equal" civil union seat in the back of the bus. (Just google "The black-vote schism")

We test our "friends" (and politicians) the same way we test any metal -- under stress and under pressure. It's easy to be courtly when one has a cleverly prepared propaganda speech and a wheel-barrow full of public relations clap trap; but the only way to really test one's metal is under pressure. Since it is admitted that Obama had no real opponent in the Illinois race, since the outcome was never really in doubt, and since he won by a whopping 70% margin (he was always at least 65% ahead of his opponents), it was therefore entirely unnecessary (and utterly lacking in courage) for Obama to claim that the only reason gays should be denied marriage is because of the "religious connotations" which he must adhere to as a Christian -- so much for his respect for separation of church and state! (And he openly states this hypocrisy even though his own religious denomination (the UCC) performs same-sex marriage ceremonies while making distinction to heterosexual marriages. What hypocrisy!!!)

As a Harvard educated civil rights lawyer (so called) Obama knew the right thing to do but when he didn't even have to make a compromise he sold-out on the most important civil rights issue of the day and knuckled under to homophobic black Christian fundamentalists when it was entirely unnecessary! Hypocrisy!!! Hypocrisy!!! Hypocrisy!!! Obama's official position on marriage equality is at odds with virtually every black civil rights leader in America today. (See "Our Supporters" at the National Black Justice coalition). Indeed, Nobel Peace Prize winner Bishop Desmond Tutu has called this civil union exclusion from marriage nothing less than "apartheid" -- what an interesting choice of words! But Obama just holds his finger to the wind to see which way it blows.

When he says he's not in favor of marriage equality he's about as believable as Lincoln who consistently maintained that he was not in favor of abolition of slavery! Such politicking with civil rights may be politics but is this leadership? We understand the well-intended cynical manipulation at play here but are such people really worthy of trust? This illusion and cynical sophistry for sale are precisely what Socrates and Plato railed against! Heaven forbid the young should be corrupted by the truth and the wool lifted from their eyes. Obama, with all his illusions and sophistry for sale, has made some totally absurd statements with regard to civil rights and religion. Now watch as the chickens come home to roost!

Oh, BTW -- they say Obama is good-looking ... I can't help laughing at that!




The Advocate releases a Barack Obama interview about the controversy he's dealing with on homophobia. When the Obama campaign announced that Donnie McClurkin would be among the featured singers on the U.S. presidential candidate's gospel tour in South Carolina this weekend, it inadvertently ventured into the void between African-American Christians and gays and lesbians. The fact that he has called homosexuality a “curse” that runs against “the intention of God” rips open the wounds of so many gay African-Americans who have been “prayed over” for years by family and friends who endeavor to save them from their “shameful” fate. There appeared to be two choices for Obama’s campaign: Keep McClurkin on the tour and disregard the cash-laden gay constituency that has bundled money with the best of ’em for Obama or ditch McClurkin at the expense of sacrificing a precious bloc of votes from South Carolina’s black religious community. But rather than oust McClurkin, the campaign found a third way, officially adding gay minister Andy Sidden to the tour on Wednesday. "This is not a situation where I have backed off my positions one iota. You’re talking to somebody who talked about gay Americans in his convention speech in 2004, who talked about them in his announcement speech for the president of the United States, who talks about gay Americans almost constantly in his stump speeches. If there’s somebody out there who’s been more consistent in including LGBT Americans in his or her vision of what America should be, then I would be interested in knowing who that person is... My views on gay issues and on choice issues are well-known. I did not trim my sails in the conversation I had with them. And I think as a consequence of appearances like that, I am helping to encourage understanding that will ultimately strengthen the cause of LGBT rights. At some point, if we are going to have a conversation on these issues, what I expect to be judged by in the LGBT community is, have I been a strong advocate, have I been a forceful advocate, have I avoided these issues in any way. And If I have not, then that’s how I expect to be judged," Obama said to The Advocate.

http://www.advocate.com:80/news_detail_ektid50021.asp

etana

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Re: Presidential Hopeful ...
« Reply #196 on: April 14, 2008, 01:43:54 PM »



The Advocate releases a Barack Obama interview about the controversy he's dealing with on homophobia. When the Obama campaign announced that Donnie McClurkin would be among the featured singers on the U.S. presidential candidate's gospel tour in South Carolina this weekend, it inadvertently ventured into the void between African-American Christians and gays and lesbians. The fact that he has called homosexuality a “curse” that runs against “the intention of God” rips open the wounds of so many gay African-Americans who have been “prayed over” for years by family and friends who endeavor to save them from their “shameful” fate. There appeared to be two choices for Obama’s campaign: Keep McClurkin on the tour and disregard the cash-laden gay constituency that has bundled money with the best of ’em for Obama or ditch McClurkin at the expense of sacrificing a precious bloc of votes from South Carolina’s black religious community. But rather than oust McClurkin, the campaign found a third way, officially adding gay minister Andy Sidden to the tour on Wednesday. "This is not a situation where I have backed off my positions one iota. You’re talking to somebody who talked about gay Americans in his convention speech in 2004, who talked about them in his announcement speech for the president of the United States, who talks about gay Americans almost constantly in his stump speeches. If there’s somebody out there who’s been more consistent in including LGBT Americans in his or her vision of what America should be, then I would be interested in knowing who that person is... My views on gay issues and on choice issues are well-known. I did not trim my sails in the conversation I had with them. And I think as a consequence of appearances like that, I am helping to encourage understanding that will ultimately strengthen the cause of LGBT rights. At some point, if we are going to have a conversation on these issues, what I expect to be judged by in the LGBT community is, have I been a strong advocate, have I been a forceful advocate, have I avoided these issues in any way. And If I have not, then that’s how I expect to be judged," Obama said to The Advocate.

http://www.advocate.com:80/news_detail_ektid50021.asp


There you go again

Sen. Barack Obama says if elected president he won't require that his appointees to the Joint Chiefs of Staff support allowing gays to serve openly in the military. Sen. Barack Obama said Thursday a repeal of 'don't ask, don't tell' is possible if he's elected. The Democratic presidential front-runner told The Advocate, a gay magazine, that he wants to repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays, which was instituted during the Clinton administration. He said his priority for the Joint Chiefs will be that they make decisions to strengthen the military and keep the country safe, not their position on the policy. "I would never make this a litmus test for the Joint Chiefs of Staff," Obama said in an interview with The Advocate. "But I think there's increasing recognition within the Armed Forces that this is a counterproductive strategy. We're spending large sums of money to kick highly qualified gays or lesbians out of our military, some of whom possess specialties like Arab-language capabilities that we desperately need. That doesn't make us more safe."

The Advocate provided The Associated Press with excerpts of the interview, posted on its Web site Thursday. The interview comes after Obama was criticized by gay advocates for not speaking to the gay media. The Philadelphia Gay News last week ran a large blank space on its front page next to an interview with Sen. Hillary Clinton to highlight that Obama did not talk to the publication. "The gay press may feel like I'm not giving them enough love, but basically all press feels that way at all times," Obama told The Advocate. He said he's frequently spoken out against homophobia and in support of gay rights. Asked what he could reasonably accomplish for the gay community as president, Obama said he can "reasonably see" repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy as well as signing legislation to ban workplace discrimination against gays. He said he'd like transgendered people to be covered by the law, but thinks it would be tough to get such legislation through Congress. Obama also said he's interested in ensuring that same-sex couples in civil unions get federal benefits.


http://edition.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/04/10/obama.gay.ap/index.html?eref=rss_politics&iref=polticker

o l i v e r

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Allegations of Homosexuality, Drug Abuse
« Reply #197 on: April 16, 2008, 11:31:17 AM »



There you go again

Sen. Barack Obama says if elected president he won't require that his appointees to the Joint Chiefs of Staff support allowing gays to serve openly in the military. Sen. Barack Obama said Thursday a repeal of 'don't ask, don't tell' is possible if he's elected. The Democratic presidential front-runner told The Advocate, a gay magazine, that he wants to repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays, which was instituted during the Clinton administration. He said his priority for the Joint Chiefs will be that they make decisions to strengthen the military and keep the country safe, not their position on the policy. "I would never make this a litmus test for the Joint Chiefs of Staff," Obama said in an interview with The Advocate. "But I think there's increasing recognition within the Armed Forces that this is a counterproductive strategy. We're spending large sums of money to kick highly qualified gays or lesbians out of our military, some of whom possess specialties like Arab-language capabilities that we desperately need. That doesn't make us more safe."

The Advocate provided The Associated Press with excerpts of the interview, posted on its Web site Thursday. The interview comes after Obama was criticized by gay advocates for not speaking to the gay media. The Philadelphia Gay News last week ran a large blank space on its front page next to an interview with Sen. Hillary Clinton to highlight that Obama did not talk to the publication. "The gay press may feel like I'm not giving them enough love, but basically all press feels that way at all times," Obama told The Advocate. He said he's frequently spoken out against homophobia and in support of gay rights. Asked what he could reasonably accomplish for the gay community as president, Obama said he can "reasonably see" repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy as well as signing legislation to ban workplace discrimination against gays. He said he'd like transgendered people to be covered by the law, but thinks it would be tough to get such legislation through Congress. Obama also said he's interested in ensuring that same-sex couples in civil unions get federal benefits.

http://edition.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/04/10/obama.gay.ap/index.html?eref=rss_politics&iref=polticker




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slightlybehind

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Re: Presidential Hopeful ...
« Reply #198 on: April 17, 2008, 10:33:02 AM »

[...] In fact, his biggest "policy proposals" have been largely squabbles with other candidates. When he said that he would meet with leaders of rogue states like Iran and North Korea, [...]


Oh please stop this Iran and North thing..

ex nihilo

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Re: Presidential Hopeful ...
« Reply #199 on: April 21, 2008, 02:14:38 PM »
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If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.