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Author Topic: DRIVING WITH MONEY IS A CRIME  (Read 3537 times)

2005_2L

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Re: DRIVING WITH MONEY IS A CRIME
« Reply #20 on: September 19, 2006, 03:56:26 PM »
Basically all cash has come in contact with drugs at some point while in circulation.  It's not the least bit surprising that a drug dog alerted to it.  I don't find the fact that the drug dog alerted to it to be the least bit convincing as evidence that the guy was involved in drugs.

Strong

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Re: DRIVING WITH MONEY IS A CRIME
« Reply #21 on: September 19, 2006, 05:10:38 PM »
Basically all cash has come in contact with drugs at some point while in circulation.  It's not the least bit surprising that a drug dog alerted to it.  I don't find the fact that the drug dog alerted to it to be the least bit convincing as evidence that the guy was involved in drugs.

I will remember that and not accept $100 bills from partners in a lawfirm

o rly

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Re: DRIVING WITH MONEY IS A CRIME
« Reply #22 on: September 19, 2006, 09:34:32 PM »
LOL Strong! ;)

chickenbreast

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Re: DRIVING WITH MONEY IS A CRIME
« Reply #23 on: September 19, 2006, 09:37:55 PM »

Basically all cash has come in contact with drugs at some point while in circulation.  It's not the least bit surprising that a drug dog alerted to it.  I don't find the fact that the drug dog alerted to it to be the least bit convincing as evidence that the guy was involved in drugs.



Cocaine hydrochloride is very stable. It binds closely to the ink in in paper currency. Most Americans handle cocaine every day of their lives.
De justice je m'en charge!

lunacarpet

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Re: DRIVING WITH MONEY IS A CRIME
« Reply #24 on: September 23, 2006, 11:04:35 PM »
Chicken, you're so funny! ;)

mudlaw

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America is a police state
« Reply #25 on: October 16, 2006, 11:56:31 PM »
About 10 days ago, some obscure British diplomat opined that America was becoming a police state. This utterance brought on the usual expressions of outrage from Americans who have grown somewhat weary of the anti-American sentiments of foreign leftists. Now that the rhetoric has died down a bit, can we take a second look at what this anti-American firebrand had to say? While it's almost certainly true that this British politician's statement had malicious, rather than benevolent, overtones, perhaps we should consider whether there might be some truth in his words. Let's take that "police state" charge and run with it for a few hundred words.

First, a definition: The Internet's dictionary.com website defines "police state" as: "A state in which the government exercises rigid and repressive controls over the social, economic and political life of the people, especially by means of a secret police force."

Simple enough! All we have to do now is discern whether or not our beloved country exercises what might be called "rigid and oppressive controls" over our "social, economic and political life." I'm certainly not here to argue that America has become a police state in the image of any number of communist, fascist or theocratic regimes you could name. Let's just say that we need to look at this picture a bit more closely.

First, our social life: We begin early here, with zero-tolerance rules in our schools. Would you say that kicking a young girl out of school because her Tweetie Bird key chain is a weapon is just a bit rigid? How about expelling an Eagle Scout who inadvertently came to school with his Boy Scout ax in the trunk of his car after a Scout meeting the previous night?

As we move into adulthood, we face Republican Sen. Rick Santorum's expressed belief that the nuances of our sex lives ought to be subject to government regulation based on majority rule! In Santorum's America, you would presumably have to get your government's blessing before you became too adventurous with your mate in the privacy of your home. In some states – Alabama, for instance – the "improper" use of a battery-operated device could land you in the pokey!

And what of the sanctity of your home? In Covington, Ga., you are required by law to submit to government inspections of your home. They even measure the temperature inside your refrigerator! If you resist the inspection, you will be arrested and jailed while the government inspectors prowl through your stuff. In government colleges and universities across the nation, students are subject to disciplinary action if they utter an "offensive" or "insensitive" thought.

We're running out of space ... so let's move on to our economic lives.

The level of taxation burdening the average American family in 2003 is higher than that imposed by the British Crown in pre-revolutionary war America. Many Americans work into the month of June without earning one single penny for themselves. We are forced to "contribute" almost 15 percent of our earnings into a bankrupt income redistribution /vote-buying scheme that is sold to us as a retirement and insurance plan. Our government goes to extreme measures to make it as difficult as possible for us to provide for the health-care needs of our families, preferring instead to build dependence on employers and government.

Our government can pry into your bank accounts without your knowledge or permission, and just recently tried to enact a program that would require your bank or credit union to notify the government in the event you engage in any economic activity that doesn't track with your past behavior. Remember, also, the forfeiture regulations. We actually had a U.S. senator introduce legislation that, if it had become law, would have permitted any local or federal law enforcement officer to seize your cash if he happened to find you carrying more than 10 grand in an airport, bus station, interstate highway or most other public places. No arrest, no questions, no charges ... just take the money. The legislation failed, but police agencies seize cash from hapless citizens just the same.

We find evidence of government rigidity and oppression in our political lives too. Just try to get a third party on a ballot in almost any state. It's difficult to impossible. Gerrymandering voters into congressional districts shaped like drunken tapeworms denies many voters an effective voice in Congress. And let's not forget the Democrats' efforts in 2000 to wipe out the votes of Americans serving abroad in the uniform of our armed forces. Finally, what about the definition's reference to "secret police?" Consider the IRS, the DEA and the ATF. The IRS, for instance, pays your neighbor or co-worker to spy on your economic and social behavior.

Space runs short, the examples do not. For further reading, I refer you to the Bush administration's Patriot Acts I and II. Happy reading.

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Neal Boortz is an author and nationally syndicated libertarian talk-show host. Full disclosure compels him to reveal that he is also a "reformed" attorney who is being paid massive amounts of money in exchange for his promise not to actually practice law any more.

theblackemma

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Re: DRIVING WITH MONEY IS A CRIME
« Reply #26 on: July 24, 2007, 06:07:31 PM »

[...]

"Junk bond king" Michael Milken was put into a similar situation. Unless he agreed to a plea, the prosecutors threatened to indict his younger brother. If prosecutors can so easily frame the wealthy and politically connected, what do you think happens daily to the inner city poor? Prosecutor Rudy Giuliani was a master at using the media to destroy the reputations of his victims, thus pre-empting a trial where evidence of a crime could be tested. Giuliani climbed over the bodies of his high-profile victims to become mayor of New York and a 911 hero.

[...]



Rudy Giuliani dressed in drag, appearing with Donald Trump at the 2000 Mayor's Inner Circle Press Roast.

cen

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Re: DRIVING WITH MONEY IS A CRIME
« Reply #27 on: March 18, 2008, 02:36:19 PM »
Lawyerly Lairs: Eliot Spitzer's Sugar Daddy


[...] Legal scholar and law school dean Henry Manne showed that prosecutor Eliot Spitzer's charges against mutual funds are largely trumped-up. The offenses are partly the unintended result of a Security and Exchange Commission "reform," which capped redemption fees that mutual funds used to discourage market timers. Prosecutor Spitzer's claims about mutual funds were based, not on law, but on an academic paper written at the Stanford University GSB [...]


Are you talking about Eliot Laurence Spitzer who's elected governor of New York in November 2006 after being New York State Attorney General? The one who this month was reported to have been involved in a prostitution ring? If that's the case, you've to keep in mind what a spoiled brat he is -- he's a very wealthy, generous father. Bernard Spitzer, a real estate mogul worth some $500 million, provided his mature son with free housing.

In Manhattan. On the Upper East Side. On 5th Avenue.

Spitzer had lived rent-free with his family at 985 Fifth Ave. for 13 years. The 25-story tower off 79th St. has just two apartments per floor and terraces that look down at the Metropolitan Museum of Art... Thanks to his dad's generosity, Spitzer, his wife and 3 daughters have lived in a home graced with at least 3 bedrooms, 4 baths, a balcony, library and sweeping vistas of Central Park... Vetted by lawyers and accountants, the living arrangement was considered both lawful and proper according to Darren Dopp, Spitzer's communications director: The father payed an annual gift tax on the present he gives his son... The market value of the gift was reported annually on real estate tax filings and on Bernard Spitzer's tax returns. Citing privacy Dopp has declined to disclose the apartment's rent, the gift's value or the amount of the gift tax paid, though. Real estate brokers familiar with the building had said that a spread of comparable size could lease for $16,000 to $20,000 a month. That puts the gift's current value at an estimated $192,000 to $240,000 a year.

Nobody would mistake 985 Fifth Avenue for one of the avenue's "best" buildings, however -- e.g., 820 Fifth Avenue, 834 Fifth Avenue. After all, nine-eighty-five did not make Tom Wolfe's 1985 list of "Good Buildings" -- and this should come as no surprise. It's not a co-op, but a rental building; it's not prewar, but from 1968 (a dubious year for residential architecture); and it's made of yellow brick, not limestone (or even red brick). How could Eliot Spitzer stand to live in such a déclassé building? His disturbingly fervent hunger for the governor's mansion made perfect sense. Or for the Emperors Club VIP's whore Alexandra Dupré, for that matter.

(On February 13, 2008, Dupré took Amtrak from New York's PA Station to D.C. for an assignation at the Mayflower Hotel with Spitzer for some $4,300. The arrangements had been made by phone between Spitzer and a booker at Emperors Club VIP, and were monitored by federal investigators who had initiated a wiretap after his bank had filed a suspicious activity report regarding money transfers by Spitzer to a front company operated by the escort service. Caught on the FBI's wiretap was Dupré's response to the booker's mention of other escorts' difficulties with Spitzer. "I don't think he's difficult," said Dupré. "I mean it's just kind of like, whatever, I'm here for a purpose. I know what my purpose is. I am not a...moron, you know what I mean.")

J 12

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Lawyerly Lairs: Eliot Spitzer's Sugar Daddy
« Reply #28 on: March 18, 2008, 03:36:19 PM »

(On February 13, 2008, Dupré took Amtrak from New York's PA Station to D.C. for an assignation at the Mayflower Hotel with Spitzer for some $4,300. The arrangements had been made by phone between Spitzer and a booker at Emperors Club VIP, and were monitored by federal investigators who had initiated a wiretap after his bank had filed a suspicious activity report regarding money transfers by Spitzer to a front company operated by the escort service. Caught on the FBI's wiretap was Dupré's response to the booker's mention of other escorts' difficulties with Spitzer. "I don't think he's difficult," said Dupré. "I mean it's just kind of like, whatever, I'm here for a purpose. I know what my purpose is. I am not a...moron, you know what I mean.")


Ashley Alexandra Dupree Offered $ 1 Million to Go Nude

Ashley Alexandra Dupree, the high-priced prostitute at the center of Gov. Spitzer's sex scandal has been offered $1 million to go nude for Hustler Magazine. "Larry Flynt and Hustler Magazine will be offering $1 Million to Ashley Dupre to pose for Hustler Magazine," a rep for Hustler Magazine announced. "We want this to happen as soon as possible."

Penthouse Magazine has also made an offer. "We would love to see Ashley appear on our Web site. We would be thrilled. We are definitely reaching out to her," says Penthouse executive Marc Bell. "Her 15 minutes of fame are now and Penthouse could mean a unique and enormous opportunity for her."

nealric

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Re: DRIVING WITH MONEY IS A CRIME
« Reply #29 on: March 18, 2008, 09:01:08 PM »
Just read the opinion in full...

I first thought the report was just hyperbolic, but the case is rather galling. It seems that good reason gets thrown right out the window once drugs get mentioned. What I don't get is how the large sums necessarily relate to drug trafficing rather than illicit activity in general (the statute only provides for forfeture of drug money). All the court has is the drug dog. Having been sniffed out by a drug dog in customs once (when I had never come into contact with illegal drugs of any type in my entire life), I can personally attest that a false positive is by no means even strong evidence. One can only hope that the SCOTUS grants cert.

The title of this thread, however, is incorrect as has been previously noted. He has been charged with no crime. 
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Chief justice Earl Warren wasn't a stripper!
Now who's being naive?