Law School Discussion

Lying on Your Resume

Re: Lying on Your Resume
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2006, 03:04:51 PM »
sure, go ahead and lie...but just do it knowing that it's possible you'll get caught and then fired from whatever job you used the lie to secure. personally, i don't think it's worth it but that's just me

J D

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Re: Lying on Your Resume
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2006, 03:25:49 PM »
In general, the law considers lying bad. (Privilege against self-incrimination is a different matter). Use this as a rule of thumb.

I wouldn't call that privilege lying, or group it anywhere near that category though.  What it represents is the absence of an obligation to tell the truth (with respect to the factual situation at hand), or to say anything.  But the absence of any duty to speak does not give one the duty to speak falsely.

Re: Lying on Your Resume
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2006, 05:03:27 PM »
If they ask you about the gap, couldn't you just say that you wanted to take some time for yourself before you work your ass off for the rest of your life?  Might make you stand out (hopefully in a positive way) from the "typical" law student. 

Don't lie about this - imagine what will happen if you're caught! - no one will trust you!

Re: Lying on Your Resume
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2006, 05:16:46 PM »
In general, the law considers lying bad. (Privilege against self-incrimination is a different matter). Use this as a rule of thumb.

I wouldn't call that privilege lying, or group it anywhere near that category though.  What it represents is the absence of an obligation to tell the truth (with respect to the factual situation at hand), or to say anything.  But the absence of any duty to speak does not give one the duty to speak falsely.
true...but when one is asked to enter a plea and says "innocent" although this is not factually correct, that could be seen as a lie.

For the OP - did you do anything over this time that's worth mention on a resume, such as volunteer? That would be valid on a resume. Lying -- still can't recommend it. As others have noted, you can do it, but it can also be against your best interests.

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Re: Lying on Your Resume
« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2006, 07:14:29 PM »
Are you trying to cover-up some kind of inpatient substance abuse treatment or something that would look bad and creates a gap in your employment?



JohnnyAwesome

Re: Lying on Your Resume
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2006, 09:18:58 PM »
you should lie as much as you want, because if you apply for a firm and you say that you worked at another firm in the same city or maybe even region it's safe to say that the person interviewing you does not know anyone from the firm you're lying about so if you lie on your resume they'll have no idea that you're lying.

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Re: Lying on Your Resume
« Reply #16 on: September 15, 2006, 05:56:08 AM »
Is the OP Lonelygirl15?

Re: Lying on Your Resume
« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2006, 03:33:31 PM »
I guess it would be better to lie about Volunteer work in that case.

Re: Lying on Your Resume
« Reply #18 on: September 16, 2006, 03:39:39 PM »
I guess it would be better to lie about Volunteer work in that case.
Yes, because no one ever tracks these things.

In fact, make lying the cornerstone of your legal education and, as you continue, your legal career. You're off to a good start...congrats.

Re: Lying on Your Resume
« Reply #19 on: September 16, 2006, 04:14:54 PM »
Simply not worth it.  The legal community is small and you just don't know who will know who or what.  You beef up your resume with a volunteer job at "Legal Rights for Puppies and Kittens Inc" and soem profound animal lover will pull your resume out of the pile because of it.  Then, there you are at an interview with nothing reasonable to say about it.  Just weigh the risks- are you really the first law student to have some gaps?  Make up for it by doing some interesting things now.  I don't think these made up "gap-fllers" are likely to be that helpful.  But if you get caught you could be done in that city, region or further.  Lawyers talk.  Especially about people stupid enough to lie.  And networking is hands down the best way to get a job.  No one will vouch for you if you get caught. 

Further- there are big moral implications here.  Fall to this little temptation and then it won't seem so bad to fudge your billables.  Then it won't be so bad to misappropriate client funds.... Do this on your merits.  If you're not proud of how you've spent your time, then start now building a better resume.