Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Law Review Executive Board Positions -- Worth It?  (Read 2560 times)

boston08

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Law Review Executive Board Positions -- Worth It?
« on: August 27, 2006, 12:20:06 PM »
I recently made Law Review. Elections for the Editorial Board's high-level positions (what we call the "Front Office") take place in February, sooner than one would think.

I'm wondering how much effort I should put into attempting to get a Front Office position. At my school, all second-year staff members automatically become members of the Editorial Board. Thus, even if I don't apply/run for any of the Front Office positions, I will still have a pretty good title: "Note Editor," "Comment Editor," or "Article Editor."

In the mind of a legal employer (e.g. big law firm or judge), how significant are the differences in the various positions (e.g. Note Editor vs. Editor-in-Chief vs. Managing Editor vs. Associate Managing Editor vs. Lead Articles Editor vs. Production Editor, etc.)? Do these positions differ by school, the result being that employers do not differentiate too much between them with the exception that they differentiate between EIC and all others?

How much work does each position require? Which position will enhance my marketability the most, while not requiring too much work? For example, would it be a good idea to run for EIC, but not any other positions because they are not worth it?

A couple of other questions: Would "shadowing" the EIC for a few months a little bit be a good way to increase my chance of being elected EIC, or would he just think I'm an annoying gunner and hate me? I would like to watch what he does to see what I'm actually getting into before running for EIC, so I wouldn't be doing it just to kiss ass. Perhaps doing this would show him that I'm really interested in the EIC position.

racheles05

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 168
    • View Profile
Re: Law Review Executive Board Positions -- Worth It?
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2006, 12:35:20 PM »
I don't know what goes on in the employers' heads, but it hasn't come up in an interview yet and I have on my resume that I'm an editor. All they care about are grades and membership on a journal - but I haven't done the more intense callbacks yet, so I don't know.

boston08

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Law Review Executive Board Positions -- Worth It?
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2006, 03:36:42 PM »
This is what I thought, which is why I wonder if going for EIC (or other similar position) is even worth it.

I don't know what goes on in the employers' heads, but it hasn't come up in an interview yet and I have on my resume that I'm an editor. All they care about are grades and membership on a journal - but I haven't done the more intense callbacks yet, so I don't know.

jippyjappa

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 11
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Law Review Executive Board Positions -- Worth It?
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2006, 11:00:13 AM »
it's worth it at my school because it comes with a scholarship and a stipend. Also, for those looking for academic careers, the big 2 or three positions are more well thought of.

Bored 3L

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 63
    • View Profile
Re: Law Review Executive Board Positions -- Worth It?
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2006, 02:47:23 PM »
Generally, employers prefer students who have an editorial position (i.e. front office, as your journal defines it), and give additional weight to the EIC, ME.  That said, I dont think editor positions are make or break—it's just another factor employers consider.  It's my understanding that judges are more concerned with editorial positions than law firms.

Assuming you get your job through OCI, it shouldn't really matter though, because you will have accepted a summer associate position before you know whether you have been chosen to be an editor (OCI will be complete by February).  Thus, it would only really matter if you want to re-interview in your third year, of if you plan on applying for clerkships.

Also, I would def. not try to shadow the EIC or anyone else.  If you're curious as to what the job entails -- and you should be if you're seriously considering applying for the position -- sit down and talk with the EIC, but don't try to shadow him.

As a personal anecdote, I was an editor on the law review at my school, though not the EIC or ME, and, thus far, I don't think it's helped me in any tangible way, though I suppose it might down the road.

rapunzel

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Law Review Executive Board Positions -- Worth It?
« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2006, 08:58:18 PM »
Much bigger deal with clerkships than firms, I'd say.  And yes, EIC carries the most weight- the others may be viewed as reasonably equivalent to each other, even if they are not.

That being said, I did not have any editorial position and I now clerk for the top court of my state.  My comment will be published- and I think that is a big plus, but other than that I had some other pretty hefty extra-curriculars on my resume to point to if anybody wanted to inquire why I wasn't an editor.

Also- you are talking a serious time commitment and your grades may suffer.

giraffe205

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 278
    • View Profile
Re: Law Review Executive Board Positions -- Worth It?
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2006, 10:39:12 PM »
Much bigger deal with clerkships than firms, I'd say.  And yes, EIC carries the most weight- the others may be viewed as reasonably equivalent to each other, even if they are not.

That being said, I did not have any editorial position and I now clerk for the top court of my state.  My comment will be published- and I think that is a big plus, but other than that I had some other pretty hefty extra-curriculars on my resume to point to if anybody wanted to inquire why I wasn't an editor.

Also- you are talking a serious time commitment and your grades may suffer.

I agree. For appellate clerkships EIC is almost a must.