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Author Topic: Briefing - Technicolor In-Book v. Writing  (Read 2536 times)

Flip21

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Briefing - Technicolor In-Book v. Writing
« on: August 26, 2006, 06:26:00 PM »
I'm on the cusp of my first real day of law school, so I figured I might as well sort this out.  I read LSC, obviously, and technicolor briefing sounded like a good approach.  However, threads here discussing the method have said it's not as useful as actually writing your own brief.  Ideally, I'd like to do both, but I'm worried about time constraints.

Any opinions on the matter?

I have five classes this term--ConLaw, Contracts, Property, CivPro, and pass/no pass Legal Writing.  Would I have the time to brief in-book and the transfer the information to a written brief?  Does that even make sense, or is it too redundant?

Thanks.

slacker

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jjason

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Re: Briefing - Technicolor In-Book v. Writing
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2006, 01:33:59 PM »
Writing your briefs, the drag that it may be, is definitely the way to go. In my own opinion of course.

Alamo79

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Re: Briefing - Technicolor In-Book v. Writing
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2006, 09:33:24 PM »
I'm only a week and a half in, so my opinion may change, but I like going through the action of typing the briefs.  I think it helps the important stuff get stuck in my brain better.  I also like having it in front of me for when I get called on in class (you never know when this will happen, and all of my profs practice at least some variation of the socratic method (which I actually like).  I also like the fact that later, I have an electronically searchable collection of briefs.  I'm sure I'll get faster in briefing as I go along, but at this point I can't see myself giving it up completely, despite a lot of advice I've gotten from current students, many of whom have done well, that you don't need to brief. 

jippyjappa

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Re: Briefing - Technicolor In-Book v. Writing
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2006, 10:53:09 PM »
briefing in technicolor is the way to go- just make sure you type up your notes into some kind of outline form later. this is good becuase you go through the material three times- onece while briefing, once in class, once while writing up tyhe imp. bits.

remember- If it's not said in the case or notes (somewhere you can highlight it) and it can't fit in the margin of the book, it doesn't need to be remembered (or written down).

Also, your outline at the end of the year should not consist of a list of briefs, many make this mistake. The outline has very littel to do with briefs...

LostMyMonkeys

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Re: Briefing - Technicolor In-Book v. Writing
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2006, 11:56:08 PM »
Definitely take the time to write them out now. Some classes may require more depth than others, but do it for all classes. Once you hit 2L year, you have learned enough that you dont need to go through the proces 100% of the time and can take shortcuts, but before that, its in your best interest to brief the cases fully and learn how to pull out all the relevant material
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jacy85

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Re: Briefing - Technicolor In-Book v. Writing
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2006, 05:08:56 AM »
I'm only a week and a half in, so my opinion may change, but I like going through the action of typing the briefs.  I think it helps the important stuff get stuck in my brain better.  I also like having it in front of me for when I get called on in class (you never know when this will happen, and all of my profs practice at least some variation of the socratic method (which I actually like).  I also like the fact that later, I have an electronically searchable collection of briefs.  I'm sure I'll get faster in briefing as I go along, but at this point I can't see myself giving it up completely, despite a lot of advice I've gotten from current students, many of whom have done well, that you don't need to brief. 

I did this the first couple months.  A few posters here liked to tell me I was wasting my time, and it was worthless.  I was happy with how I did, and felt comfortable doing what I was doing.  At some point during the semester, I did shift over to book briefing, but I did it when I felt real briefing was no longer a help to me.  Keep doing what you're comfortable doing!

Texas

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Re: Briefing - Technicolor In-Book v. Writing
« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2006, 01:10:12 PM »
My approach was two colors - yellow for important things like facts and the court's reasoning, and green for the court's rulings. plus I did a lot of margin writing. I saw no need to complicate it with several other colors.


beer gunner

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Re: Briefing - Technicolor In-Book v. Writing
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2006, 12:21:42 AM »
briefing in technicolor is the way to go- just make sure you type up your notes into some kind of outline form later. this is good becuase you go through the material three times- onece while briefing, once in class, once while writing up tyhe imp. bits.

remember- If it's not said in the case or notes (somewhere you can highlight it) and it can't fit in the margin of the book, it doesn't need to be remembered (or written down).

Also, your outline at the end of the year should not consist of a list of briefs, many make this mistake. The outline has very littel to do with briefs...

good advice; I have started out with the 5 highlighter method and typing up briefs; thanks for the insight on outlines there
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robmelone

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Re: Briefing - Technicolor In-Book v. Writing
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2006, 10:24:03 AM »
The first year is all about finding out what works for you.  I like to do a written brief IN the book.  I do my whole IRAC in the margins of the casebook.  That way I never lose the brief. . .and if I get called on in class your notes are immediately available.

Again, that method works for me, you have to try different things and soon you will find what works for you.

By the way, the other thing I like to do is write next to each paragraph a couple of words about what the paragraph was about so if the professor asks a question I don't know, I can quickly scan for something related to the question and find the information.

Hope this helps!

Rob
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