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Author Topic: Briefing the Notes Section  (Read 418 times)

BME_Law

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Briefing the Notes Section
« on: August 18, 2006, 05:40:23 PM »
So I had my first class today of LRW and we went over how to do briefs.  After doing one first hand with the class (to some extent), I figured that I could start doing the reading for my other classes and begin briefing on my own.  Doing well so far, except that I have a quick question.  Is it necessary to brief/summarize the Notes section that appears after the actual case?  I'm assuming that the editor/author adds this section as supplemental material to support what was read and to provide additional examples and scenarios.

holler21

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Re: Briefing the Notes Section
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2006, 05:47:44 PM »
I'm also a new 1L, so take my advice for what it's worth...

I'd say that only if the notes are extremely interesting, maybe throw a quick reference in the section where you analyze the case (I call mine "Analysis" some call it "Comments," etc.)

I have read on this board before that the notes are helpful for class and that it's important to read over them as part of your preparation.  However, they are afterall just "notes" and so as a matter of brevity (ie it's called a "brief"), I would minimally reference the notes if there is something particuarly striking.  Good luck - hope this helps.

BME_Law

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Re: Briefing the Notes Section
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2006, 06:03:48 PM »
Thanks, I completely agree.  Originally I had only made minor refernces to the notes if anything stood out.  Just wanted to make sure that I wasn't really missing anything or adding too much.

Jumboshrimps

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Re: Briefing the Notes Section
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2006, 06:35:51 PM »
Most professors would disagree that notes are secondary to the cases. In addition, you WILL run into cases your first year that are meaningless without help from the notes. These cases will either be so old, or so complex, or so wordy (which means poorly-written), that they are unintelligible without the help of a scholar/ interpreter.

The questions in the notes section of your casebooks will come back to haunt you in class, as well.

rapunzel

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Re: Briefing the Notes Section
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2006, 09:13:25 PM »
Read the notes, maybe write a thought in the margin of your book.  That's just as easy to reference if you get called on and will save you a ton of time.  Even better- stop briefing a few weeks in and make all your notes in the margins.

LostMyMonkeys

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Re: Briefing the Notes Section
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2006, 09:36:51 PM »
Definitely read the notes and make a note of what they say.. brief, though. Usually the notes explain certain aspects of the case you just read, aspects that are usually relevant
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racheles05

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Re: Briefing the Notes Section
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2006, 09:55:48 PM »
This depends on the professor. There are some professors who never test what's in the notes, but there are some who have questions on the exam that you can only answer with knowledge of the notes. Read the note until you know what your professor is looking for.

blawg

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Re: Briefing the Notes Section
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2006, 10:19:39 PM »
i think it is important to outline the notes. the key issue is how much. i didn't even read the notes in torts and got an a-, but i was all over casebook notes in property, so i think it depends. focus on the cases though and make sure you undertand the takeaway, the rule, the pedagogical point, whatever...this should come from 1) professor; 2) cases; and 3) casebook notes. if you get it from reading the cases and through listening to your professors, then spend less time with the casebook notes and work on the application of the principles.

(note: study guides are absent).