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Author Topic: Laser printer a good investment?  (Read 6448 times)

slacker

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Re: Laser printer a good investment?
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2006, 11:05:22 PM »
While I don't know for sure, it's possible that what the poster meant was that they're free, in that all supplies and such are covered, only when you print on campus. You can always download/email/whatever the cases to yourself, but then you have to pay for the supplies if you're printing them -- paper, toner, electric, whatever goes into it.

LostMyMonkeys

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Re: Laser printer a good investment?
« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2006, 12:00:52 AM »
Yes, that was exactly my point. I can print them at home all I want, but that is my paper and ink going into that, and with the amount of cases you end up printing off, oye, no thanks!
Nice ass won't get you through your whole life. When you turn 30 you better have a personality

notquitealawyer

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Re: Laser printer a good investment?
« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2006, 05:01:09 PM »
bottom line print on campus for free while you have free pages (usually 100 free pages offered by the school). For the rest of the time pay the 5 cents. I used the school's printer and spent a total of about $20 per semester (a little more during the second semester).

Buy a laser printer if you want to write a novel in your spare time

holler21

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Re: Laser printer a good investment?
« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2006, 09:09:04 AM »
So, by the way this discussion has gone, it seems like it comes down to personal preference.  I hate inkjets and reading online, so it seems like it might be a quality investment for me [plus my inkjet is like 4 years old and who knows how much longer it will last...

Thanks for all of your input - best of luck this coming year.

Data

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Re: Laser printer a good investment?
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2006, 08:26:59 PM »
Next time you make a printout from your color laser printer, shine an LED flashlight beam on it and examine it closely with a magnifying glass. You might be able to see the small, scattered yellow dots printed there that could be used to trace the document back to you. According to experts, several printer companies quietly encode the serial number and the manufacturing code of their color laser printers and color copiers on every document those machines produce. Governments, including the United States, already use the hidden markings to track counterfeiters.

Peter Crean, a senior research fellow at Xerox, says his company's laser printers, copiers and multifunction workstations, such as its WorkCentre Pro series, put the "serial number of each machine coded in little yellow dots" in every printout. The millimeter-sized dots appear about every inch on a page, nestled within the printed words and margins. "It's a trail back to you, like a license plate," Crean says. The dots' minuscule size, covering less than one-thousandth of the page, along with their color combination of yellow on white, makes them invisible to the naked eye, Crean says. One way to determine if your color laser is applying this tracking process is to shine a blue LED light--say, from a keychain laser flashlight -- on your page and use a magnifier.

Crime Fighting vs. Privacy

Laser-printing technology makes it incredibly easy to counterfeit money and documents, and Crean says the dots, in use in some printers for decades, allow law enforcement to identify and track down counterfeiters. However, they could also be employed to track a document back to any person or business that printed it. Although the technology has existed for a long time, printer companies have not been required to notify customers of the feature. Lorelei Pagano, a counterfeiting specialist with the U.S. Secret Service, stresses that the government uses the embedded serial numbers only when alerted to a forgery. "The only time any information is gained from these documents is purely in [the case of] a criminal act," she says. John Morris, a lawyer for The Center for Democracy and Technology , says, "That type of assurance doesn't really assure me at all, unless there's some type of statute." He adds, "At a bare minimum, there needs to be a notice to consumers."

If the practice disturbs you, don't bother trying to disable the encoding mechanism -- you'll probably just break your printer. Crean describes the device as a chip located "way in the machine, right near the laser" that embeds the dots when the document "is about 20 billionths of a second" from printing. "Standard mischief won't get you around it," Crean adds. Neither Crean nor Pagano has an estimate of how many laser printers, copiers, and multifunction devices track documents, but they say that the practice is commonplace among major printer companies.

"The industry absolutely has been extraordinarily helpful [to law enforcement]," Pagano says. According to Pagano, counterfeiting cases are brought to the Secret Service, which checks the documents, determines the brand and serial number of the printer, and contacts the company. Some, like Xerox, have a customer database, and they share the information with the government. Crean says Xerox and the government have a good relationship. "The U.S. government had been on board all along -- they would actually come out to our labs," Crean says.

History

Unlike ink jet printers, laser printers, fax machines, and copiers fire a laser through a mirror and series of lenses to embed the document or image on a page. Such devices range from a little over $100 to more than $1000, and are designed for both home and office. Crean says Xerox pioneered this technology about 20 years ago, to assuage fears that their color copiers could easily be used to counterfeit bills. "We developed the first (encoding mechanism) in house because several countries had expressed concern about allowing us to sell the printers in their country," Crean says. Since then, he says, many other companies have adopted the practice. The United States is not the only country teaming with private industry to fight counterfeiters. A recent article points to the Dutch government as using similar anticounterfeiting methods, and cites Canon as a company with encoding technology. Canon USA declined to comment.
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johns259

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Re: Laser printer a good investment?
« Reply #15 on: December 14, 2006, 11:04:41 PM »
I bought my own laser printer but I'm starting to think it was a mistake. I paid $15 for a cartridge and was only able to print about 120 pages or so before I got the low ink signal. Though it is convenient at times, I'm feeling it wasn't a wise decision, but I guess if it saves your ass even once it's worth it.

mantoytano

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Re: Laser printer a good investment?
« Reply #16 on: December 25, 2006, 05:14:37 AM »


Laser-printing technology makes it incredibly easy to counterfeit money and documents, and Crean says the dots, in use in some printers for decades, allow law enforcement to identify and track down counterfeiters. However, they could also be employed to track a document back to any person or business that printed it. Although the technology has existed for a long time, printer companies have not been required to notify customers of the feature. Lorelei Pagano, a counterfeiting specialist with the U.S. Secret Service, stresses that the government uses the embedded serial numbers only when alerted to a forgery. "The only time any information is gained from these documents is purely in [the case of] a criminal act," she says. John Morris, a lawyer for The Center for Democracy and Technology , says, "That type of assurance doesn't really assure me at all, unless there's some type of statute." He adds, "At a bare minimum, there needs to be a notice to consumers."

If the practice disturbs you, don't bother trying to disable the encoding mechanism -- you'll probably just break your printer.


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ifamlaw

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Re: Laser printer a good investment?
« Reply #17 on: December 25, 2006, 05:35:56 AM »
wow, intersring thread

LawNOrder

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DocuColor Tracking Dot Decoding Guide
« Reply #18 on: December 29, 2006, 11:34:06 PM »

Next time you make a printout from your color laser printer, shine an LED flashlight beam on it and examine it closely with a magnifying glass. You might be able to see the small, scattered yellow dots printed there that could be used to trace the document back to you. According to experts, several printer companies quietly encode the serial number and the manufacturing code of their color laser printers and color copiers on every document those machines produce. Governments, including the United States, already use the hidden markings to track counterfeiters.

Peter Crean, a senior research fellow at Xerox, says his company's laser printers, copiers and multifunction workstations, such as its WorkCentre Pro series, put the "serial number of each machine coded in little yellow dots" in every printout. The millimeter-sized dots appear about every inch on a page, nestled within the printed words and margins. "It's a trail back to you, like a license plate," Crean says. The dots' minuscule size, covering less than one-thousandth of the page, along with their color combination of yellow on white, makes them invisible to the naked eye, Crean says. One way to determine if your color laser is applying this tracking process is to shine a blue LED light--say, from a keychain laser flashlight -- on your page and use a magnifier.

Crime Fighting vs. Privacy

Laser-printing technology makes it incredibly easy to counterfeit money and documents, and Crean says the dots, in use in some printers for decades, allow law enforcement to identify and track down counterfeiters. However, they could also be employed to track a document back to any person or business that printed it. Although the technology has existed for a long time, printer companies have not been required to notify customers of the feature. Lorelei Pagano, a counterfeiting specialist with the U.S. Secret Service, stresses that the government uses the embedded serial numbers only when alerted to a forgery. "The only time any information is gained from these documents is purely in [the case of] a criminal act," she says. John Morris, a lawyer for The Center for Democracy and Technology , says, "That type of assurance doesn't really assure me at all, unless there's some type of statute." He adds, "At a bare minimum, there needs to be a notice to consumers."

If the practice disturbs you, don't bother trying to disable the encoding mechanism -- you'll probably just break your printer. Crean describes the device as a chip located "way in the machine, right near the laser" that embeds the dots when the document "is about 20 billionths of a second" from printing. "Standard mischief won't get you around it," Crean adds. Neither Crean nor Pagano has an estimate of how many laser printers, copiers, and multifunction devices track documents, but they say that the practice is commonplace among major printer companies.

"The industry absolutely has been extraordinarily helpful [to law enforcement]," Pagano says. According to Pagano, counterfeiting cases are brought to the Secret Service, which checks the documents, determines the brand and serial number of the printer, and contacts the company. Some, like Xerox, have a customer database, and they share the information with the government. Crean says Xerox and the government have a good relationship. "The U.S. government had been on board all along -- they would actually come out to our labs," Crean says.

History

Unlike ink jet printers, laser printers, fax machines, and copiers fire a laser through a mirror and series of lenses to embed the document or image on a page. Such devices range from a little over $100 to more than $1000, and are designed for both home and office. Crean says Xerox pioneered this technology about 20 years ago, to assuage fears that their color copiers could easily be used to counterfeit bills. "We developed the first (encoding mechanism) in house because several countries had expressed concern about allowing us to sell the printers in their country," Crean says. Since then, he says, many other companies have adopted the practice. The United States is not the only country teaming with private industry to fight counterfeiters. A recent article points to the Dutch government as using similar anticounterfeiting methods, and cites Canon as a company with encoding technology. Canon USA declined to comment.


http://www.eff.org/Privacy/printers/docucolor/

ping

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Re: Laser printer a good investment?
« Reply #19 on: March 12, 2007, 05:25:12 PM »
In many senses, adding a wireless capability to your network is like adding a miniature Internet to your network, in the sense that you're creating an opening for potentially hostile elements. A cyberterrorist would only need to drive around an area until a LAN could be found that either had lots of bandwidth or vulnerable systems, and use those resources to launch attacks on local and/or remote networks and systems.

In effect, your wireless network can be a cyberterrorist dreamland. Chris O'Ferrell, chief technology officer of the wireless technology company Netsec, knows this firsthand. He keeps an eye out for vulnerable 802.11 networks, and is amazed at how many he finds. Located in Herndon, Virginia, Netsec's offices are in the heart of "Spook Valley," where the Pentagon, the CIA, and many information-security companies are located. While driving through Washington's Dulles International Airport, O'Ferrell says he can often see baggage-operator networks on his computer.

So much for increased airport security in our nation's capital.