Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Married Students  (Read 3896 times)

LitDoc

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 720
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Married Students
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2006, 04:22:28 PM »
That's why I don't participate on these boards so much anymore -- most of the threads usually devolve into dreck, and seem to be nothing more than time killers. I've got extra time on my hands, but I'd rather spend it talking about interesting things that might change the way I think, or force me to articulate my thinking, etc. -- instead of talking about how many beers I can drink, and how many undergrads I'm going to bed, and how sweet my fraternity is/was....

Why do I feel like I am being judged needlessly here? Is there something wrong with the humorous wasting of time? If I want to get into a heart-to-heart or bore the rest of the population with pretentious pedantry, I will do so elsewhere.

I'm with you Deuces, this is why I will study alone.


I think you took this too personally, perhaps because I was addressing you directly on another thread, regarding the unfunniness of female comedians. I did not have you in mind in the above statement -- you're certainly far from the only one doing what I was referring to. And rest assured, my "judgment" here isn't a harsh one. I don't think badly of this talk; I'm not condemning anybody. I was just expressing a personal preference for one kind of discussion over another.
"There is no was." -- William Faulkner

University of Texas, Class of '09

margee

  • Guest
Re: Married Students
« Reply #21 on: July 31, 2006, 10:11:33 AM »
 ???

al·lit·er·a·tion    ( P )  Pronunciation Key  (-lt-rshn)
n.
The repetition of the same sounds or of the same kinds of sounds at the beginning of words or in stressed syllables, as in “on scrolls of silver snowy sentences” (Hart Crane). Modern alliteration is predominantly consonantal; certain literary traditions, such as Old English verse, also alliterate using vowel sounds.
 
as·so·nance    ( P )  Pronunciation Key  (s-nns)
n.
Resemblance of sound, especially of the vowel sounds in words, as in: “that dolphin-torn, that gong-tormented sea” (William Butler Yeats).
The repetition of identical or similar vowel sounds, especially in stressed syllables, with changes in the intervening consonants, as in the phrase tilting at windmills.
Rough similarity; approximate agreement.



How are they not alliteration?
(honest question)

LitDoc

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 720
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Married Students
« Reply #22 on: July 31, 2006, 10:35:46 AM »
They are examples of alliteration, though, in some instances, some assonance is also present.

"Holly hopped along the hallway" provides both: the 'h' sound at the start of each word is alliteration; the 'ah' sound in four of the five words is assonance.
"There is no was." -- William Faulkner

University of Texas, Class of '09

Felsen

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 94
    • View Profile
Re: Married Students
« Reply #23 on: July 31, 2006, 11:39:33 AM »
Hmmm...  If that definition is wrong, either my English teachers taught it wrong (very likely), or I misunderstood them (less likely).  I thought that assonance and consonance were just two complete subsets of alliteration, depending on the beginning letter of the words.

pocho

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 32
    • View Profile
Re: Married Students
« Reply #24 on: July 31, 2006, 11:44:39 AM »
All of this talk about English makes me realize more and more I really am an engineer.  To think I thought I was a decent writer despite my background :), now I know I am completely lacking in the English skills department.  Hopefully, some of you will be kind enough to proofread my papers ;D.

pocho

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 32
    • View Profile
Re: Married Students
« Reply #25 on: July 31, 2006, 12:23:14 PM »
I haven't taken it yet.  I wanted to this summer but don't have the money for test prep and such.  I really wanted to have it done before interviewing for summer positions, but I highly doubt that is going to happen, considering even if I did have the money, I don't think I'd have the time to study for it. 

I have a friend that took it last Friday.  He was smart and got it done before school started at all. He got an unoffical pass. 

FYI, he said there were lots of questions on a new law passed around 2004.  He said those were the hardest for him because his test prep materials didn't have a lot on it.  Oh, that and he said after the 6 hours you are pretty much wasted.

jess427m

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: Married Students
« Reply #26 on: July 31, 2006, 06:24:42 PM »
All of this talk about English makes me realize more and more I really am an engineer.  To think I thought I was a decent writer despite my background :), now I know I am completely lacking in the English skills department.  Hopefully, some of you will be kind enough to proofread my papers ;D.

Somehow I doubt assonance and consonance will be critical elements of our legal writing classes.  Though haven't there been some instances of witty judges issuing opinions in verse?  Or am I thinking of a West Wing episode?

BTW, pocho, have you already taken the patent bar?  I spent my weekend with my nose in the MPEP.  Good times.

I'm pretty sure it was West Wing although it may have happened in real life as well.

Felsen

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 94
    • View Profile
Re: Married Students
« Reply #27 on: July 31, 2006, 06:52:50 PM »
It has happened in real life.  You can do an internet search and find some.  I would link some of the articles here, but the only ones I found weren't very good examples of poetry.