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theaggiefan

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What were your numbers?
« on: July 13, 2006, 11:43:34 AM »
Trying to figure out where I should apply.  What were your numbers and did you get in off the waitlist?

cozmo

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Re: What were your numbers?
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2006, 11:45:56 AM »
check out www.lawschoolnumbers.com, it is the perfect resource for that kind of information

Felsen

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Re: What were your numbers?
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2006, 11:55:10 AM »
http://officialguide.lsac.org/OFFGUIDE/pdf/lsac6882.pdf

The official breakdown for last year's admissions are at the end.  You can use the LSAC on-line book to get one of these for most colleges.  Some of the top 14 schools don't give the tables.

Also take into account that UT is a state school.  So it will be easier to get in with Texas residency than without Texas residency.  In 2004, they only accepted 20% non-residents.  I thought I heard that was recently raised to 40% or so, but I am not sure if that is accurate.  That would make it easier for non-residents to get accepted, and harder for residents to get accepted.

Nixlimited

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Re: What were your numbers?
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2006, 11:59:11 AM »
http://officialguide.lsac.org/OFFGUIDE/pdf/lsac6882.pdf

The official breakdown for last year's admissions are at the end.  You can use the LSAC on-line book to get one of these for most colleges.  Some of the top 14 schools don't give the tables.

Also take into account that UT is a state school.  So it will be easier to get in with Texas residency than without Texas residency.  In 2004, they only accepted 20% non-residents.  I thought I heard that was recently raised to 40% or so, but I am not sure if that is accurate.  That would make it easier for non-residents to get accepted, and harder for residents to get accepted.

I had heard rumors of a slight bump in out of state acceptance rate, but it was more on the order of 35% total. Apparently they are doing this to get their overall numbers up to be more competitive with top-10 schools.

Let me tell you, there is nothing like growing up in Texas (18 years), going to school out of state, then having to apply to UT as an out of state student when, in-fact, I am coming back home. BLAST!

EDIT: I wonder if they use undergrad GPA/gradschool GPA/best for that matrix???
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Nixlimited

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Re: What were your numbers?
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2006, 01:29:23 PM »
Let me tell you, there is nothing like growing up in Texas (18 years), going to school out of state, then having to apply to UT as an out of state student when, in-fact, I am coming back home. BLAST!

Didn't you work out of state as well?  I was under the impression that a resident who went to school out of state but otherwise retained TX residency (permanent mailing address at parents' home, etc.) would still be considered a resident if s/he returned immediately thereafter. 

That does suck, though, especially if they didn't give you a nonresident tuition waiver (I had the impression they gave those out fairly liberally, though).

Quote
EDIT: I wonder if they use undergrad GPA/gradschool GPA/best for that matrix???

I imagine those GPAs are LSAC GPAs, which would exclude graduate GPAs.  Otherwise it'd be pretty meaningless to compare those grids across schools - but then, schools can present that data how they like, or omit it entirely, so I dunno.

You are correct, I have been out working for 3 years not in Texas. I think you are right about excluding graduate GPA ... too bad, that one was way better for me!
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pocho

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Re: What were your numbers?
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2006, 01:45:17 PM »
I'm not a Texas resident, and I would consider myself an average UT law student.  I guess it all depends. 

Nixlimited

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Re: What were your numbers?
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2006, 02:12:24 PM »
Right.  I was thinking that since most nonresidents have to be significantly higher than the mean just to be admitted in the first place, they'd be proportionally more likely to get merit-based waivers.

I think I remember Montauk's book saying that under the old 20% cap, TX residency was worth the equivalent of something like 2 LSAT points. 

That sounds vaguely familiar.  It won't be as pronounced now, not to mention that all the TX residents I met/knew at PSD had higher numbers than I did.

Hey Brave, this is terribly random, but I saw in another post that you are into cars. Is that right? I am a total car nut and shadetree mechanic.
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Felsen

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Re: What were your numbers?
« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2006, 02:32:30 PM »
You are correct, I have been out working for 3 years not in Texas. I think you are right about excluding graduate GPA ... too bad, that one was way better for me!

One very good reason for not using graduate GPA is that you have to do some scaling before comparing it to undergraduate GPA.  For example, a UG GPA of 3.5 in Engineering is considered very good.  I don't think many companies have a cut-off rate higher than that.  A Masters in Engineering with a GPA of 3.5 is considered average to below average.

Felsen

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Re: What were your numbers?
« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2006, 02:38:05 PM »
I didn't check Texas' residency requirements very closely.  After 7 years here, I only needed to glance at the rules to make sure I was covered.

I did check out Nebraska's residency requirements when I was investigating schools.  I'm still considered a resident for purposes of attending UNL, because I graduated from High School there.  So some states do take that into account.

lil kat

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Re: What were your numbers?
« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2006, 02:58:51 PM »
Hey Brave, this is terribly random, but I saw in another post that you are into cars. Is that right? I am a total car nut and shadetree mechanic.

Not sure if I'd call myself a nut, but I like my car and other fast cars :D

i'm totally into cars too!  ;D  although i'm sure it's not at the level that ya'll probably are and i wouldn't actually get under the hood to fix one...but i'd def say that i know more than the avg chick (yes, i realize i'm stereotyping).  my hardcore gearheads friends rubbed off on me, plus i've been working on a suspension system for the past year.