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Author Topic: Studying 1 year Ahead  (Read 3856 times)

antwan

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Re: Studying 1 year Ahead
« Reply #10 on: July 06, 2006, 09:50:17 AM »
2 things that i did OL summer to prep were: 1) doing leews and 2) read the E+Es for all my first year classes. Doing leews in the summer is good because you wont have time during the school year. I think reading the E+Es helped too. I was very happy with my 1st year performance, not sure if it was cause of the prep work but it cant hurt. If nothing else, it will help ease the stress of diving in to the unknown. Plus if you are doing the prep reading and one topic just doesnt make any sense at all, then maybe that will give you an indication of what you should spend most of your time on during the semester. good luck

OingoBoingo

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Re: Studying 1 year Ahead
« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2006, 05:03:12 PM »
Unequivocally I urge you to chill out and not do any prep work.  First, very little of the first year material is about memorization, so your approach is moot.  Second, whatever you do memorize you will forget before you start classes - I can attest to this as I study for the bar and have to refresh on topics every week.  Third, you have no clue what topics your professor will cover, so you're going about it blindly. 

Yours is a very very bad idea and mentality to approaching law school.  And for God's sake, do not let this side of yourself come out in your personal statements.

Cosigned and I haven't even started 1L yet. This advice gets harder to follow the closer you get. I can understand the OP's attitude because I really really like to be prepared well in advance but this is, well, kind of silly.

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elemnopee

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Re: Studying 1 year Ahead
« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2006, 06:17:42 PM »
Spend 0L summer doing everything that you will not be doing when you are a 1L. 

Some suggestions:
-Get in shape/start a workout plan
-Talk to friends and family
-Party
-Play sports
-Watch movies
-Go on vacation
-And whatever else you like to do

Voyager

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Re: Studying 1 year Ahead
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2006, 11:43:44 AM »
Ok guys. Got it. Thanks.

Again, I thought I was asking a reasonable question... didn't any of you ever prepare for an intense experience you knew you were going to undergo? I did not expect the visceral reaction I received on the board. I guess my question ran counter to the acceptable norms of the culture on the board and in law school. I had no way of knowing that it would.

That being said, I don't think what I was asking was insane or "silly". Law students say the first year can be rough and it just seems natural to try to prepare as well as possible for it... or at least explore the option.

In any case, I appreciate the feedback and honest responses. I certianly have no trepidation about showing up there and working it day by day from the start.

DeltaTauKyle

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Re: Studying 1 year Ahead
« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2006, 08:25:12 AM »
Here's the best advice I can give you about law school: Act like a normal person.  Using 'visceral' and 'running counter' will make you sound like all the other gunners :)  Hell, I don't even proof read the stuff I write here.

If you want to prepare for law school, go put yourself around a bunch of people you can't stand and try to smile continuously ;)
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Ronald Hyatt

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Re: Studying 1 year Ahead
« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2006, 10:53:24 AM »
2 things that i did OL summer to prep were: 1) doing leews and 2) read the E+Es for all my first year classes. Doing leews in the summer is good because you wont have time during the school year. I think reading the E+Es helped too. I was very happy with my 1st year performance, not sure if it was cause of the prep work but it cant hurt. If nothing else, it will help ease the stress of diving in to the unknown. Plus if you are doing the prep reading and one topic just doesnt make any sense at all, then maybe that will give you an indication of what you should spend most of your time on during the semester. good luck

Ahh... the PLS approach. (If you have the time, go ahead and read PLS too.) I also did this, except that I didn't do LEEWS, I only read about 100 pages from each E+E for my 1L classes, and I read the Delaney books (I highly recommend the Delaney books... short, simple, and helpful). I agree that it helped and would recommend anyone who is anxious and/or nervous about 1L to prep this way. It definitely does not hurt, confuse, or put you at a disadvantage. At worst it could be characterized as a waste of time, but I think for many reasons it does help.

For one thing it just gives you an overview of the BLL in the course, it doesn't muddle your brain with details of stupid cases like Pennoyer like your professors will. The E+E's are particularly good because they give you the BLL and then illustrate it with hypos. I went back the the E+Es many times during the year for hypos to practice or for clarification on BLL when the prof was hiding the ball. When you cover the material in class it will be the second time you've heard it and worked with it, putting you at an obvious advantage even if only an edge of mental confidence. I can give you two concrete examples where reading the E+E the summer before law school definitely helped me. 1) Estates and Future Interests - while everyone in my section struggled with this material, it was a second review for me, and I AmJur'd on the final. 2) Personal jx - Pennoyer is confusing no matter what, but at least I knew minimum contacts was coming and that Pennoyer only really stood for jx by in-state personal service, so I didn't waste too much time caring about Pennoyer.

Anyway, just one "learned skill" proponent in a sea of "natural born geniuses," but I'm sure all the rest of the sage advice is coming from posters who finished in the top 5% of their class too.
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jjason

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Re: Studying 1 year Ahead
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2006, 12:36:13 PM »
Overly ambitious?

Maybe three to six months before starting law school, grab nutshells. These are great for providing an overview of the courses you will study during your first year. They will aid you in seeing the "big picture" while taking your classes.

Nutshells: Contracts, Civil Procedure, Introduction to the Study and Practice of Law.

Criminal Law - You'll get that. It is an elements-based type course. I'd say look through Model Penal Code, but you won't really get it unless you've read cases; It depends on your learning style. I think you'll be busy enough with the above nutshells. The K nutsheel is almost like a book.

Browse online and look for topics/advice about law school and being a law student. There are several blogs (blawgs) written by law school professor.

Good luck. Relax though. You are going to be in deep once school starts. You'll want to start fresh and relaxed.


johns259

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Re: Studying 1 year Ahead
« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2006, 01:46:45 AM »
I agree with Jjason for the most part, but I would add some autobiographies(I use the term loosely here) to the list. Reading anything that goes over the "big picture" of a concept of law won't hurt. I have found that autobiographies are great because they're usually entertaining and provide you with an invaluable sense of why you're doing what you're doing throughout law school. Remember you'll not just be learning for yourself but for your future clients as well.

Autobiographies by defense attorneys tend to be the most interesting imho, e.g. Roy Black, John C. Tucker, Edward Bennett Williams, etc. However, Boies' book probably fits the majority of law students' ambitions due to the fact that he is probably the best attorney in the nation to have on your side in complex litigation and his applications of poker playing tactics to litigation are fascinating. Reading books such as these really got me fired up about going to law school.

As the saying goes, the law is going to be a jealous mistress for the rest of your life (if you stay in the field of course). Avoid the burn out if you can.

NorthEast_1L

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Re: Studying 1 year Ahead
« Reply #18 on: July 21, 2006, 06:59:43 PM »
I am about to begin my 1L, and am also nervous about what to read.  I enjoyed Getting To Maybe: How to Excel on Law School Exams, I assume it was a good read, but all of the other books on my schools 'incoming 1L suggested reading list' appear totally worthless.  I then read Justice Scalia's book 'A Matter of Interpretation', and am now studying the Emanuel Crunchtime Torts book; I read through it once and am now trying to memorize basic terms and concepts.  Am I on the right track with this approach?  Are there any particular 'nutshells' which I should look for?
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jacy85

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Re: Studying 1 year Ahead
« Reply #19 on: July 21, 2006, 07:09:25 PM »
I am about to begin my 1L, and am also nervous about what to read.  I enjoyed Getting To Maybe: How to Excel on Law School Exams, I assume it was a good read, but all of the other books on my schools 'incoming 1L suggested reading list' appear totally worthless.  I then read Justice Scalia's book 'A Matter of Interpretation', and am now studying the Emanuel Crunchtime Torts book; I read through it once and am now trying to memorize basic terms and concepts.  Am I on the right track with this approach?  Are there any particular 'nutshells' which I should look for?

I hope to god this is flame; but if it's not, you need to stop right now.  You should not be memorizing anything at this point.  You have no idea what your torts professor will cover (or what any professor will cover, for that matter).  Just go sit on a beach or something.