Law School Discussion

List all of the negative aspects of attending part time law school

IONLYKNOWY

list anything that you have heard or experienced as a negative aspect of a part time program at a law school.  Whether that be they dont give scholarships, no law review, no ranking amongst peers, jobs, pay.. you get the drift.

IONLYKNOWY

Re: List all of the negative aspects of attending part time law school
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2006, 02:24:12 PM »
guess part time isn't that popular.. or maybe too many negatives to list.. ;D

4DClaw

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Re: List all of the negative aspects of attending part time law school
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2006, 02:48:49 PM »
Bulletproof logic.

Re: List all of the negative aspects of attending part time law school
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2006, 02:57:39 PM »
I would say that one problem is that if you're going Part-time, you likely work and therefore don't have time to do the extras or be involved in campus life aside from class. Also, you don't get to do the externships.

But, the negatives aren't too many to list. It's actually smart for some people to do. My reason for going Part-time is that while working for the next four years, I will have contributed to my retirement fund well over what I'm paying in tuition. Not many Full-time students can say that considering the ABA only lets them work 20 hours.

So their are some pros and cons as with everything.

4DClaw

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Re: List all of the negative aspects of attending part time law school
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2006, 03:30:58 PM »
There is not a good selection of electives after you've completed your second (traditionally your first) year.  Let's face it:  most of the best electives are offered during the day, since most law professors are not too thrilled with the prospect of teaching night school.

Erapitt

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Re: List all of the negative aspects of attending part time law school
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2006, 03:55:50 PM »
There is not a good selection of electives after you've completed your second (traditionally your first) year.  Let's face it:  most of the best electives are offered during the day, since most law professors are not too thrilled with the prospect of teaching night school.


Maybe this is true at lower ranked schools but I know GW offers quite a bit of evening electives each semester.  Also, PT students can take classes in the day if they are dead set on a specific class.

Lastly, every lawyer I have spoken to has told me that electives should be used to better prepare you for the bar, let the firms train you in the particular field of law you are interested in.  That being said, the important electives will always be around for PT students to take.


Re: List all of the negative aspects of attending part time law school
« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2006, 08:55:02 PM »
Wow. You're just so eloquent. Your the ass that took the thread negative in the first place so shout your pie-hole and move on.

Re: List all of the negative aspects of attending part time law school
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2006, 11:11:16 PM »
Well, GW is only one example of a higher-ranked school offering a plethora of electives for the night students.  I have several friends who have attended various law schools in the past as part-time night students, and they have all said that the electives offered at night were quite skimpy.

Yes, it is generally true that electives should be the courses that will be tested on the bar.  However, you have to keep in mind that not everyone who attends law school is thinking about taking the bar; I am one of those people.  Why am I going to law school, you may ask, if I have no intention to take the bar?  Quite simply:  you don't need a bar license to be a claims attorney in insurance law.  At least, that is the way things are at my (insurance) company. 

Furthermore, firms don't "train."  Just like law school, and even more so, you are handed a case and basically told to "figure it out."  My boss is told that all the time:  "figure it out and hurry up." 

Further still, those who attend the part-time program at night are usually doing so because they work full time.  That is why the part-time night program is there:  to accomodate those students who cannot afford to leave their jobs and attend school full time.  That is simply not an option for people who have families for which to provide.  Thus, even if we crave to take a certain class, we are precluded from doing so.  Do you think our bosses really care that we want to take a course during the day that is not being offered at night?  That is a leading question to which I'm sure you know the answer.



4DClaw

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Re: List all of the negative aspects of attending part time law school
« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2006, 02:25:10 AM »
This is just one big huge generalization. There may be some part-timers that brag about their jobs. But there also are some full-timers who think the year they spent as a paralegal after college makes them the expert on all legal matters.

I've met plenty of part-time students, and there are a few that are too proud of themselves. But there are douches in every class. I've also met some incredibly bright people and spoken them for a long time without knowing what they do during the day (and when I eventually find out, it's something impressive enough that they could have bragged about, but didn't).

I considered going to school full-time, but I chose to continue working for personal and financial reasons. Yes, I took a different path than you did. I don't expect to be praised for it or to have any leg up in the job market. Grades are the determining factor for any full-time OR part-time student, and anyone who thinks otherwise is lying to themselves. However, I also don't expect someone who knows nothing about me to judge me because I chose to go part-time.

The students.


Hey there ballbag, at least a good portion of the night students have already proved themselves in the "real" world and many are sucessful in there careers but just looking for the edge that a law degree can give them. The same could be said for Day STudents because there are quite a few that have done nothing but attend school for the past 22 years. In hiring someone fresh out of law school, most employers would love to see some actual work experience instead of a professional student.

Thanks for proving my point. I went through night school throughout undergrad, and I personally know quite a few in law school now. Generally speaking, they all lack the capacity to carry on a conversation without boring the class with there "at my job we do it this way..., that not what its like in the real world..., ohhh the how hard I have it..." stories, as if they on a monopoly on adversity in life. Guess what, no wants to hear your life story every week.

The fact that you have all sorts of real world experience that employers are going to drool over is great, but do me a favor an keep it to your self. If someone were to go around telling everyone that employers are going to love them because they are on law review and or the top ten percent of their class, you would think they are a feminine hygiene product.

Likewise, telling everyone how much money you are making during law school, maxing out your 401(k) and what have you, is about as cool as a trust fund baby bragging about his new 500 CLK. It may you feel good to hear yourself, but everyone else wants to puke. Be proud of you accomplishments, and shut up. 

Moreover, you can be proud of the fact that you raise a family, and work, and go to law school, but keep it to yourself. Everyone has their own problems they need to deal with, be it work, a sick family member, or who knows what. Everyone has problems; most people just don't have the need to tell people everyday.

I know there are people like this in day sections too, it just seems for concentrated and visible at night school.

On a more practical note, the differing schedules for night students out side of school makes it hard to coordinate study time and stuff. (hence my ballbag worthy comment “the students” being the problem). Also, office hours for profs are usually by appointment at night, so you can’t just drop in.

As far as classes, at my brother’s school, the day students usually make up about have the evening classes, because they always offer the major electives at night.

Generally, stuff like career services and the registrar only have one night a week they are open late, which can be a pain.