Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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Poll

Have you watched the nick berg video?

i sought it out and watched it
 5 (29.4%)
i ran into it inadvertantly
 1 (5.9%)
i will avoid this video at all costs
 11 (64.7%)

Total Members Voted: 12

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Felsen

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Re: Employment after graduation
« Reply #20 on: June 29, 2006, 01:32:00 PM »
Huh? I don't get it. "TT" stands for "tenure-track." Am I missing something?  :-\

Ah, sorry. I am used to TT (or T2) as a law school ranking.  T4, TTT, TT, and T1 being the three tiers respectively.  I thought you were talking about people paying their dues in lower-ranked schools before they get hired by higher ranked schools.

From what I hear, this still tends to be true.  Many people still pay their dues teaching at lower schools till they get hired by the better ones.  That's what happened with the teacher of the Mock class I was in (Buel?), she said that she had taught at another school before UT and that it was pretty typical of teachers to transfer up the ladder of schools.

LitDoc

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Re: Employment after graduation
« Reply #21 on: June 29, 2006, 02:32:50 PM »
Huh? I don't get it. "TT" stands for "tenure-track." Am I missing something?  :-\

Ah, sorry. I am used to TT (or T2) as a law school ranking.  T4, TTT, TT, and T1 being the three tiers respectively.  I thought you were talking about people paying their dues in lower-ranked schools before they get hired by higher ranked schools.

From what I hear, this still tends to be true.  Many people still pay their dues teaching at lower schools till they get hired by the better ones.  That's what happened with the teacher of the Mock class I was in (Buel?), she said that she had taught at another school before UT and that it was pretty typical of teachers to transfer up the ladder of schools.

Yes, this is quite common in academia -- though exceptional candidates do get their first prof job at top-20 schools. Leiter has some studies on this, including a ranking of which law schools are best at placing law profs at "elite" schools -- and for elite, I think he's counting more than the top 20 (can't remember if it's 30 or 40, maybe). Texas does fairly well, especially for a public school -- if I recall correctly, only Boalt, Virginia and Michigan do better.

It's traditionally in your first few years at that "lower" school that you establish your publication record, which is what attracts the "upper" schools.
"There is no was." -- William Faulkner

University of Texas, Class of '09

spellit

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Re: Employment after graduation
« Reply #22 on: November 03, 2007, 12:07:20 PM »
I'm a legal assistant for the Center for Science in the Public Interest. It's based in DC, but I work with the Director of Litigation in Dallas. You might have seen us in recent news about KFC (we're sueing them), 7 UP Natural (we want to sue them), and Frito-Lay/Olestra (we just recently got them to put additional labelling about their chips containing olestra).

I guess the reasons I love it are not law-related at all....but I love the variety of research that I get to do - from the effects of advertising on children to HFCS and trans fat. I also like the feeling that the work I am doing is making big corporations like Kelloggs and Cadbury Schweppes change their evil big business ways to improve their products or at least helping consumers make informed decisions about what they are buying/eating.

I'm not sure how big of a salary my boss has but CSPI is a multi-million dollar non-profit so he can't be doing that bad.


No doubt they're realizing big profits -- the non-profit status is chosen for tax purposes only.