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Author Topic: Goddamn grades  (Read 4029 times)

T. Durden

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Re: Godd**mn grades
« Reply #20 on: June 17, 2006, 12:06:22 AM »
yeah i just finsehd 1L

i dont really know what i'm talking about

i'm just repeating what my big time NYC law firm 3L neighbor has told me over and over and over ...

midjeep

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Re: Godd**mn grades
« Reply #21 on: June 17, 2006, 12:28:05 AM »
I'm interning for a judge right now and love it. I would like to clerk with him or another after graduation, so the law review thing will be huge for me. I also will be graduating with $150K in debt, so biglaw will have to fit in the equation eventually. Law school would be much more enjoyable if we got to study what we wanted, didn't worry about debt, and didnt have to worry about graves.....oh well.
The Internet is for porn and Lexis points.

rapunzel

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Re: Godd**mn grades
« Reply #22 on: June 17, 2006, 10:27:44 PM »
T. Durden-
Yeah, that's the thing about big law firms.  They have to keep building themselves up because there are some real downsides.  So the people who work there tend to have a bit of a narrow view. 

I summered at a big firm, but will be doing a two year clerkship.  It is very hard to resist the allure of the big money and the thought that you will be the best of the best.  And the money is great and the work can be great.  But there is a lot of work, and much of it, especially for young associates, is not great at all.  Big firm lawyers work like dogs (as do many other lawyers).  But the client or some partner is always looming and big firm lawyers have very little control over their lives, and most of their lives are consumed by work.  They aren't just trying to sell you on what they do, they are often trying to sell themselves.  They are ambitious, but they are making very large sacrifices in personal life.
Meanwhile, there are other things out there. And you will earn the respect of others in your field no matter what size firm you work for, if you do excellent work.  It's just so hard to turn out the static.  And those big law jobs are so visible, because of on-campus interviewing.  Other jobs require a lot more in networking. 

I'm not saying big law is bad- it is right for some people.  I'm just saying- determine first what you love to do.  Find your passion.  Look for something you really want to get out of bed for.  Then look for the job.  Don't make some big law job your only goal just because of what people say.

gibbsale

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Re: Godd**mn grades
« Reply #23 on: June 17, 2006, 11:36:22 PM »
I thought I'd weigh in, since I just received my transcript today. There is definitely no correlation between work and grades. I worked my ass of during the first semester, and received all Bs. I took well over 20 exams under timed conditions, went through multiple multiple choice problems (also timed) and thorougly outlined. Second semester, I slacked. There were cases I definitely did not brief (briefed everything first semester). I did not really start outlining until about a week before reading week, and I took maybe 1 or 2 exams under timed conditions, and issue spotted a handful more. I also missed more classes (not many, mind you, but I did not miss more than 2 classes first semester) and spent maybe 9 hours on my last legal writing assignment. The result? I improved in every class, and ended up with three A-s, two B+s and one B (legal writing, which I improved in immensely with my last paper). My final GPA for the year was 3.42, and Dean's List at my school (which is about the top third) is 3.1. The only possible explanation is that I worked more efficiently, or relaxed a bit.

 As a reward, I might be able to get the public defender summer position I hoped for next year.

rapunzel

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Re: Godd**mn grades
« Reply #24 on: June 26, 2006, 08:27:18 PM »
The scary thing about randomness like that is how do you know what to do next semester?  Although it sounds like maybe you did just relax and find your stride.  Although, at our school our midterms seemed purposefully deflated.

Happy_Weasel

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Re: Godd**mn grades
« Reply #25 on: June 28, 2006, 01:21:34 AM »
According to Getting to Maybe, there is an explanation why bombers pass and acers fail. The reason is because when your test was too easy, chances are that you didn't find everything and therefore can't put together an answer that the prof is looking for. However, when you find everything, you are likely overwhelmed and begin to toss up on a lot of things. Here, it is likely that you are hitting everything and the professor will be overjoyed that someone understands his complex and possibly misunderstood(though this could just be a hard science thing) mind. The point here is that unless you have exhausted yourself trying to find problems, you still have work to do. Exams should be stressful and that's why A-type personalities (from what I understand, those that are propelled by constant crises) excel at the study and practice of law. I think this is an explaination why some people who bombed and fall toward the bottom start to succed and top students begin to be in trouble is because students who are C+/120th in a 200 student class feel compelled to work harder while those who are B+/40th think they have mastered law school and can do anything they want.

jippyjappa

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Re: Godd**mn grades
« Reply #26 on: June 28, 2006, 09:16:37 AM »
I have had a similar experience to many people. You come out thinking you gota C and find out you aced it. You come out thinking you got a A and you find out you didn't do that well.

I think this is usually becuase if I come out of a law exam thinking I aced it, I probably missed something. Most exams aren't that easy. And if they are that easy, it just means everyone did well and to get that A you really must have hit every issue and analyzed them perfectly. This is why I hate "easy" exams. I never get an A on an exam no matter how easy it was!!!

Hard exams are different. They give you a margin for error. And of course you come out feeling bad, there's no way anyone got to everything. I had anevidence exam where afterwards I realized I missed the whole "expert testimony" analysis. I argued that it wasn't applicable but after talking with a few people I realized it was applicable. However, I still got an A because I spotted and throoughly discussed all of the other issues.

This is why I get some annoyed when people complain that a test was "hard" or laugh about how "easy" it was. Give me a hard test anyday (and therefore the feeling of being pond scum after it).


Happy_Weasel

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Re: Godd**mn grades
« Reply #27 on: June 28, 2006, 02:46:23 PM »
Well, I guess the trick is to make it hard for you...and perhaps the hardest tests are those that seem easy and vice-versa.

gibbsale

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Re: Godd**mn grades
« Reply #28 on: June 28, 2006, 05:47:34 PM »
I don't think I have come out of an exam thinking it was easy. The closest was perhaps the Contracts final, and that was also my last exam, so there was a little bit of relief at being done.

 I managed to convince myself I was failing exams left and right. I thought that I bombed all of my MC tests, that my essays for property and torts were crap and that I was going to be looking at a mediocre year. I also blasted myself for not studying enough. But then I was in the top 10%.

 In the law school context, if you think an exam is easy you have probably missed issues or you have been conclusory in your response and resolved issues without much analysis (the latter would be me, circa first semester, property essay). If you miss issues but your analysis rocks, you may still do well (that would be me, circa second semester property).

 I recently read my professor's analysis of the Civil Procedure essay, which was  a five question, single fact pattern monstrosity. Clearly, judging from my grade (A-), conclusions simply do not matter. I reached the wrong response (according to my prof) on 3/5 questions.

 Forget the meaning of life...law school grades are the true Great Mystery.

jacy85

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Re: Godd**mn grades
« Reply #29 on: June 28, 2006, 06:25:36 PM »

 I managed to convince myself I was failing exams left and right. I thought that I bombed all of my MC tests, that my essays for property and torts were crap and that I was going to be looking at a mediocre year. I also blasted myself for not studying enough. But then I was in the top 10%.


This was me as well.  I was 100% convinced I didn't know enough, and that everyone saw the issues I did, and probably saw more.  Then I did really well.

I was talking about this with one of my professors, and she laughed.  She said something like she's aways amazed when she talks to good students; they always think everyone else saw all(or most) issues, too, when in reality, that's not even close to being accurate.

I wonder why this is...