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Author Topic: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?  (Read 132440 times)

Consideration

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #200 on: April 28, 2007, 05:33:53 AM »
but it does seem that those with more life experience have much happier time in law school...

While I realize that everyone does not fit into a tightly sealed box, I also agree that most non-trads seem to be a little more happy about law school.

Alamo79

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #201 on: April 28, 2007, 08:22:31 AM »
I am currently a 0L so I have little insight to share on law school satisfaction.  That being said, I can tell you that working 40 hrs/wk in a job for which you have no passion makes easily as much of a dent in your personal happiness as 60hrs/wk in a job that you truly enjoy.  In my current career in the Computer Science field, I have seen both worlds. Mostly I have sat at a desk doing mundane work for eight hours a day, drawing a large pay check and watching the clock.  I have seen all of the unhappiness, greed, antisocial behavior and corporate nonesense described in the above posts and have pretty much reached the conclusion that unahppy people are everywhere and simply make their voices louder than everyone else's.  If you don't let them drag you into their mire, it won't happen.

I'm going to law school because I want to find something that I can actually get excited about waking up to go do every day.  If that means 45k/yr to start, then so be it.  If it means some extra hours, than so be it.  As long as it does not involve sitting at a computer terminal in a tiny cubicle watching the clock tick until it hits 5:00, I can't imagine regretting this decision.  I have no intentions of chasing money, prestige or any of the other nonesense that so many seem caught up in, and I think that there are a multitude of areas in the legal field in which one can find great happiness and success if they are not caught up in things like "highest starting salary."  I'm just a 0L and maybe this sounds pretty naive to those of you actually doing it but I just don't think any job can suck your soul unless you allow it to.

This was me, one year ago.  I've worked much harder in law school than I usually did for my old job (which was tech consulting, not exactly the same but still pretty close) because I've found the material so much more interesting.  And although I have been a little frazzled at times, I've definitely been happier than I was at my old job.  You sound like you're on the right track; pay no attention to the clowns on this board (except for me).

GA-fan

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #202 on: April 28, 2007, 09:39:13 AM »
I am also a non-trad, and while I think I may be happier somewhat than the average traditional student, I think that non-trads tend to put more pressure on themsleves to do well, which is probably what made the year tough.

grassroute

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #203 on: April 30, 2007, 11:32:42 PM »

But of course, he does not need an MBA -- the private equity industry pays top dollars and as a director he should be making at least $100K. It does not pay to attend a top-ranked school. That is because the likes of Wharton and Harvard tend to attract high earners, making it harder to get a big salary bump at graduation and recoup the investment in an MBA. How hard? For Harvard grads, the breakeven point will not come until 2020, or about 20 years shy of retirement!!!



[...] anyway, I was kinda wondering whether a JD from a top school is worth it when you think in the same terms as above ..


The value of an JD from a top school is definitely positive; even it may take 15 years to break even, the average Harvard JD, e.g., will still have 25 years to retire -- time period during which his salary will likely be in the range of 100-150K as opposed to the $60-70K that he would get had he not gone to law school. 

tuition & living expenses $60,000 X 3 = $180,000
lost wages                          $40,000 X 3 = $120,000

total                                             $300,000

sally

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #204 on: May 01, 2007, 04:22:57 AM »


So basically the way they culcate the cost of attending is, for Harvard, e.g.,

tuition & living expenses $74,000 X 2 = $148,000
lost wages                        $70,000 X 2 = $140,000

total                                                $300,000

Seems to me an MBA from a top school is not only not worth it, but you have to be a complete a s s h o l e to go for it [...]


Bear in mind that close to 50% of MBA students, especially part-time ones, are sponsored by their employers; the latter do not pay for living expenses though.

1.1.1

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #205 on: May 01, 2007, 04:30:19 AM »

Bear in mind that close to 50% of MBA students, especially part-time ones, are sponsored by their employers; the latter do not pay for living expenses though.


I don't think "living expenses" should be factored in the the equation ... unless you're living with your family/s.a. and you're not paying on your own for rent and food.

pittylaw

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #206 on: May 01, 2007, 04:39:36 AM »

The value of an JD from a top school is definitely positive; even it may take 15 years to break even, the average Harvard JD, e.g., will still have 25 years to retire -- time period during which his salary will likely be in the range of 100-150K as opposed to the $60-70K that he would get had he not gone to law school. 

tuition & living expenses $60,000 X 3 = $180,000
lost wages                          $40,000 X 3 = $120,000

total                                             $300,000


So basically if you graduate from, say, a TTT school and earn, say, $60,000 a year once you graduate and/or after a while after you graduate, it'll take some 30 years to reach the break-even point ?

the equation

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #207 on: May 01, 2007, 05:22:04 AM »

Bear in mind that close to 50% of MBA students, especially part-time ones, are sponsored by their employers [...]


That does not really change the ugly picture of the MBA ... if you think it thru, it is because companies know full well that the value of an MBA is zero that they out of a sense of guilt decide to cover their employees' tuition costs. The latter still incur losses in the process, though, their lost wages. 
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lovelaw

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #208 on: May 01, 2007, 05:36:17 AM »



That does not really change the ugly picture of the MBA ... if you think it thru, it is because companies know full well that the value of an MBA is zero that they out of a sense of guilt decide to cover their employees' tuition costs. The latter still incur losses in the process, though, their lost wages. 


Are you implying that employer companies slow their employees down when they encourage/demand their employees to get an MBA?! That those companies are part of a system that makes possible the very survival of business schools and the like?!

m e

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #209 on: May 01, 2007, 05:55:43 AM »

Nice assumption! I mean, the median entry-level salary for local prosecuting attorneys and public defenders is about $40-45K. And I won't even mention a legal services organization attorney's salary ($36,000)!

Computer science or computer engineering graduates fare pretty well (around $50K a year); however, liberal arts graduates occupy the lower rungs of the pay scale at about $30K. Even business administration and economics/finance graduates probably won't make $40K a year.


So basically if you graduate from, say, a TTT school and earn, say, $60,000 a year once you graduate and/or after a while after you graduate, it'll take some 30 years to reach the break-even point ?


Oh please -- are you really aware who goes to TTTs?! These are people whose earnings potential is not even $20K a year, assuming they are employable in the first place!