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Author Topic: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?  (Read 126209 times)

My Bonnie

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #590 on: February 16, 2011, 09:25:02 PM »

Exactly, a sick body is a sick body is a sick body. What difference does it make whether it's black or white?


The human body is not unlike an automobile.

Thus, doctors, like mechanics, do take better care when working on a BMW than on a Volkswagen!


I doubt it white people would feel flattered by this comment, even though you are certainly trying to be sympathetic to them.


A totally idiotic comment, no doubt about it!


I see these comments were made regarding physicians who work in inner city areas and the like - and that they are compelled to work there, given the fact that they've graduated either from Caribbean medical schools or are international medical graduates, hence deemed to be less brilliant than the American counterparts.. Since this is a law students website I will direct you to a post describing how false the belief that grads from higher-tier law schools are smarter and more intelligent -



http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/index.php?topic=3003847.msg3031460#msg3031460

V e r o n i c a

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #591 on: February 18, 2011, 11:28:27 PM »
So, My Bonnie, the magic formula is

Discrimination=Curve-Adaptive

Is it not so?

5 min only

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #592 on: February 18, 2011, 11:35:50 PM »
So, My Bonnie, the magic formula is

Discrimination=Curve-Adaptive

Is it not so?


Hahaha Veronica - the complete formula would, naturally, be

Discrimination=Curve-Adaptive+FactorF*

:)

Dominick

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #593 on: February 22, 2011, 02:09:40 AM »

Exactly, a sick body is a sick body is a sick body. What difference does it make whether it's black or white?


The human body is not unlike an automobile.

Thus, doctors, like mechanics, do take better care when working on a BMW than on a Volkswagen!


I doubt it white people would feel flattered by this comment, even though you are certainly trying to be sympathetic to them.


A totally idiotic comment, no doubt about it!


I see these comments were made regarding physicians who work in inner city areas and the like - and that they are compelled to work there, given the fact that they've graduated either from Caribbean medical schools or are international medical graduates, hence deemed to be less brilliant than the American counterparts.. Since this is a law students website I will direct you to a post describing how false the belief that grads from higher-tier law schools are smarter and more intelligent -



http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/index.php?topic=3003847.msg3031460#msg3031460


Are you talking about oblada's post, My Bonnie?

shevardnadze

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #594 on: February 22, 2011, 09:11:37 PM »

I doubt it white people would feel flattered by this comment, even though you are certainly trying to be sympathetic to them.


A totally idiotic comment, no doubt about it!


I see these comments were made regarding physicians who work in inner city areas and the like - and that they are compelled to work there, given the fact that they've graduated either from Caribbean medical schools or are international medical graduates, hence deemed to be less brilliant than the American counterparts.. Since this is a law students website I will direct you to a post describing how false the belief that grads from higher-tier law schools are smarter and more intelligent -



http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/index.php?topic=3003847.msg3031460#msg3031460


Are you talking about oblada's post, My Bonnie?


You were not able to see the picture included in My Bonnie's post, Dominick?! MyBonnie is definitely talking about oblada's post.

Prends Garde Toi!

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #595 on: February 26, 2011, 10:38:10 PM »
shevardnadze, sometimes the uploading service the user has used to host his/her images for free on the internet to be posted on this forum is down - with the result being that you won't see at that point in time the picture file included in the post.

phonepro

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #596 on: February 28, 2011, 03:20:42 AM »
yes.

Can I call you Joe?

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #597 on: March 03, 2011, 07:05:41 PM »


I see these comments were made regarding physicians who work in inner city areas and the like - and that they are compelled to work there, given the fact that they've graduated either from Caribbean medical schools or are international medical graduates, hence deemed to be less brilliant than the American counterparts.. Since this is a law students website I will direct you to a post describing how false the belief that grads from higher-tier law schools are smarter and more intelligent -



http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/index.php?topic=3003847.msg3031460#msg3031460


Are you talking about oblada's post, My Bonnie?




Not rarely the question is Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?

The Washington Post as part of a social experiment put Joshua Bell, the world famous violinist, playing incognito in the metro station. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it?

The virtuoso violinist performed beautiful and complex music on an instrument worth $3.5 million, but nevertheless received only cursory attention, or none at all, from the majority of commuters who passed him by. Although, only days earlier, Bell had played at a Boston theater where ticket prices averaged $100 each, he only made a paltry $32 from his subway performance. Bell played on a violin handcrafted by Antonio Stradivari in 1713 - an instrument that he bought several years ago for a reported price of $3.5 million. In spite of the fact that he used his outstanding ability to the full and performed some of the most intricate music ever written, only a few people even noticed the maestro and even fewer stopped to listen. The article notes:

Quote
"No one knew it, but the fiddler standing against a bare wall outside the Metro in an indoor arcade at the top of the escalators was one of the finest classical musicians in the world, playing some of the most elegant music ever written on one of the most valuable violins ever made. His performance was arranged by The Washington Post as an experiment in context, perception and priorities -- as well as an unblinking assessment of public taste: In a banal setting at an inconvenient time, would beauty transcend?"

Journalist Gene Weingarten was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing for his outstanding and thought provoking analysis of the experiment. Weingarten discusses the ramifications of Bell's subway experience. What role does context play in our artistic perceptions? To what degree is our perception of beauty influenced by our mindset at the particular time we perceive it? He notes:

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"It's an old epistemological debate, older, actually, than the koan about the tree in the forest. Plato weighed in on it, and philosophers for two millennia afterward: What is beauty? Is it a measurable fact (Gottfried Leibniz), or merely an opinion (David Hume), or is it a little of each, colored by the immediate state of mind of the observer (Immanuel Kant)?"


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/04/AR2007040401721.html

P.H.M.

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #598 on: March 19, 2011, 06:09:41 PM »
I went to law school in the mid west in 2007  (from NYC) to my first choice, a Top 100 school. I was unprepared for the academic program involved and began experiencing severe anxiety towards the end of my first semester due to the pressure of family obligations 2000 miles away and returning to school at a fairly advanced age (39). I was given the bad advice by a teaching assistant to proceed with my finals because "no one gets below a 'C' with the curve;" my grades were: B, D-, and an F. I took a medical leave of absence to have the symptoms of anxiety and depression I was experiencing evaluated and treated by university medical professionals. I returned the following Fall semester to repeat the classes, and found myself unable to balance work, and school, and still a little bit rattled by having receiving the poorest grades of my lifetime in my first semester. With the loneliness I was feeling, symptoms of depression, and concern about not being able to work as a part-time student in the prime earning years of my life, I withdrew from school. Two months later, I immediately regretted the decision, and was re-admitted for the third time to retake the first semester already $30,000.00 in debt. My third semester was somewhat of a success however I made two critical mistakes: I did NOT take practice exams in preparation for two finals, and handed a paper that represented 60% of my grade late by twelve hours; I ended up with a B-, C, and C this time around. The anxiety of being on academic probation and having little margin for error eventually resulted in more severe health problems for myself, an inability to concentrate, pressure from my family and friends, a decreased and weakened confidence in myself, and I eventually withdrew from law school altogether, $79,000.00 in debt. I will always regret having quit, even with the mounting debt, and not securing the J.D., and not having found a way to enhance my mental fortitude, find the right help and resources and the right mindset and support system to get the job done. I am now faced with trying to explain to my family and friends what went wrong, address psychological issues I never experienced before attending law school, and returning to a career I have been absent from for three years without being able to explain why I went to law school and did not work for three years and do not have a law degree to show for it. If I had to do it all over again, I would have went to a Tier Three school and a little more relaxed environment for someone my age - the first year is the toughest and if I was successful I could transfer; otherwise I could remain in the Third Tier School and earn one of the most coveted of graduate degrees: a J.D. Think carefully about yourself, especially if you have been out of school for sometime, about what you are capable of, and what this degree might mean to you. I now dread turning 55 without a professional degree, and not a minute goes by that I do not wish I knew in 2007 what I know now; as of today, the law school experience, while providing some of the fondest memories of my life, has in many ways ruined my life. A law school curriculum, particularly for non-conventional students, should be designed to give such students every possible chance for success (e.g., three exams per class in the first semester, not one final and an automatic dismissal for students with a G.P.A. of 2.20 or less).

legalized

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #599 on: March 24, 2011, 07:11:48 AM »

BUT, this is the absolute best case scenario in which you land a very high paying job at a top law firm with substantial salary increases and a growing economy that permits the assumption of a consistent bonus ... and of course that you remain at your job for 3 years (not burning out).


By SAIRA RAO

December 31, 2006 -- The city largest, most prestigious law firms are suffering from serious brain drain. Young, Gen-X lawyers in their third to fifth year in the business are walking away from their $200,000-a-year positions in record numbers -- at times without another job in view. The reason? They are unhappy with their Blackberry lifestyle -- being tethered to the job 24/7 and having to rush back to the office at a moment notice when e-mail orders pop up on the ubiquitous PDA. The exodus of law firm associates is unprecedented, according to NALP which found that 37% of associates leave large firms within the first 3 years. A whopping 77% of associates leave within 5 years, according to NALP latest survey. That is up sharply from recent years, and the resulting brain drain is wrecking havoc on law firms.

There is a significant drain on your potential as a firm if you cannot mitigate it, says Mike, a partner at a 400-plus lawyer Big Apple firm, said of the young legal eagle exodus. Mike, like many lawyers interviewed for this story, spoke only if neither they or their firm were identified, fearing client losses. While increased attrition is a typical effect of a relatively healthy economy, Mike claimed, It would be a mistake to say it is all driven by the economics. The big-firm brain drain is also giving partners a major case of agita -- forcing them to do the yeoman grunt work usually assigned to associates. In addition, the firms are being forced to scramble to fill the mid-level talent void. Some are even doing the previously unheard of -- hiring from second-tier law schools.

John, a fifth year associate at a prominent Wall Street firm, is, like many young lawyers, walking out the door. He is leaving for a coveted in-house position at an investment bank. \'I am just waiting for my bonus,\' the 31-year-old says. In fact, the next major wave of legal brain drain will occur over the next few weeks as young lawyers jump ship after collecting their bonus checks. \'It is the mid-levels, the 3rd through 5th years that are leaving, so you are losing people you have spent lots of money on training, and just as they start to run things, they leave, and firms become less profitable, Mike, the partner, adds. John, the associate ready to leave, notices the effect of the mid-level brain drain at his own firm. Gone, he said, is the traditional pyramid of power, from the numerous first-year associates up to select first-year partners.

It is gone from a pyramid to a strange hourglass shape, John says. It is bizarre. Now you will see deal teams with a partner and a first-year associate, with nobody in the middle. You should see the partners. They are doing the work of mid-levels to pick up the slack. And even though they make over $1 million, they never see their family. There is little reward in that for me. Tagg Grant, 31, could not agree more. The self-described \'recovering lawyer\' removed himself from firm life last year, as a third-year corporate associate. I did not want to sleep on my office floor anymore or wonder if I had a change of underwear somewhere in my file cabinet, he says.

http://www.nypost.com/seven/12312006/business/lawyers__fun__money_business_saira_rao.htm?page=1

LOLS the story SURE has CHANGED...draaaastically...si nce THAT article was written huh?  What a difference a couple years makes!