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Author Topic: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?  (Read 126135 times)

Q.Stud.

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #550 on: April 04, 2009, 08:43:02 PM »

  • Albert Einstein, the lone wolf
  • Niels Bohr, the obsessive but gentlemanly father figure
  • Max Born, the anxious hypochondriac
  • Werner Heisenberg, the intensely ambitious one
  • Wolfgang Pauli, the sharp-tongued critic with a dark side
  • Paul Dirac, the silent Englishman
  • Erwin Schrodinger, the enthusiastic womanizer
  • Prince Louis de Broglie, the French aristocrat, and
  • Paul Ehrenfest, who was witness to it all.
  • Pascual Jordan, the ardent Aryan nationalist, came uninvited


Interesting post, wheres - and an even more interesting signature line! I'll try that ;)
Plan to be spontaneous tomorrow.

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Soros warns of global depression ... U.S. & China agree to co-operate
« Reply #551 on: April 09, 2009, 11:03:15 AM »

Strange, Soros's education was not in law either ... yet he appears to know a little bit about these issues..

George Soros is the son of the Esperanto writer Teodoro Schwartz. Teodoro (also known as Tivadar) was a Hungarian Jew, who was a prisoner of war during and after World War I and eventually escaped from Russia to rejoin his family in Budapest. The family changed its name in 1936 from Schwartz to Soros, in response to growing anti-semitism with the rise of Fascism.

Tivadar liked the new name because it is a palindrome and because it has a meaning. Though the specific meaning is left unstated in Kaufmann's biography, in Hungarian "soros" means "next in line, or designated successor", and in Esperanto it means "will soar". His son George was taught to speak Esperanto from birth and thus is one of the rare native Esperanto speakers. George Soros later said that he "grew up in a Jewish home," and that his parents were "cautious with their religious roots." However, Soros's father was proud of his Jewish roots (which can be seen in his memoir on his experiences during the holocaust, "Masquerade").

Soros was 13 years old when Nazi Germany took military control over its wavering ally Hungary (March 19, 1944), and started exterminating Hungarian Jews in the Holocaust. Soros worked briefly for the Jewish Council, which had been established by the Nazis, to deliver messages to Jewish lawyers being called for deportation. Soros claims he was not aware of the consequence of the messages. To avoid his son being apprehended by the Nazis, his father had Soros spend the summer of 1944 living with a non-Jewish Ministry of Agriculture employee, posing as his godson. In the following year, Soros survived the battle of Budapest, as Soviet and Nazi forces fought house-to-house through the city. Soros first traded currencies during the Hungarian hyperinflation of 1945-1946.

In 1946, Soros escaped the Soviet occupation by participating in an Esperanto youth congress in the West. He (Soros) emigrated to England in 1947 and graduated from the London School of Economics in 1952. While a student of the philosopher Karl Popper, Soros funded himself by taking jobs as a railway porter and a waiter at Quaglino's restaurant where he was told that with hard work he might one day become head waiter. He also worked in a mannequin factory, but was fired for being too slow at putting on the heads. He eventually secured an entry-level position with London merchant bank Singer & Friedlander. In 1956 he moved to the United States, where he worked as an arbitrage trader with F. M. Mayer from 1956 to 1959 and as an analyst with Wertheim and Company from 1959 to 1963. Throughout this time, Soros developed a philosophy of "reflexivity" based on the ideas of Popper. Reflexivity, as used by Soros, is the belief that the action of beholding the valuation of any market by its participants affects said valuation of the market in a procyclical 'virtuous or vicious' circle.


TheDailyBell - Issue 243 • Thursday, April 02, 2009

Soros warns of global depression if G20 fails



If the G20 meeting of world leaders results in nothing but more hot air, billionaire George Soros says all bets are off - the global economy is heading for a huge meltdown. "That could push the world into depression. It's really a make-or-break occasion. That's why it's so important. The chances of a depression are quite high - even if that is averted, the recession will last a long time. Look, we are not going back to where we came from. In that sense it's going to last forever." While most investors are worried about the sorry state of the global markets, Soros finds the economic gloom-and-doom "exhilarating," and reckons a full-blown depression is inevitable. "I have to admit that actually I flourish, I'm more stimulated by the bust," Soros said in an interview with the Times of London. "On the one hand, there's the tremendous human suffering, which is very distressing. On the other hand, to be able to handle the situation is exhilarating." This recession, Soros said, is a "once-in-a-lifetime event," particularly in Britain and the United States.

Dominant Social Theme: A money master is gloomy.

Free-Market Analysis: George Soros sees the G20 meeting as a last gasp. Why are we not surprised? Soros never met a government conclave that he did not want to support, or not in the latter stages of his career anyway. And Soros, who is worth billions, has plenty of credibility. He is accurate about the markets, so shouldn't he know whereof he speaks?

If George says that the G20 is the last best hope of the global economy, then it must be, right? Let us peer a little deeper and examine what Hollywood calls "the back story." Maybe we will find some information not immediately obvious on first glance. Let us, like the Ghost of Christmas Past, travel back in time to gaze with wonder at a young George Soros being tutored at the London School of Economics by no less a free-market genius than FA Hayek himself. Yes, correct, Soros' mentor Karl Popper was best friends with Hayek, the great apprentice of the greatest of all free-market economists, Ludwig von Mises. Soros was thus well aware of Hayek from an early age, and aware of the Austrian School itself (and Mises, etc.), the great free-market, gold-based school of economics. And what did George Soros do when he graduated? Well, he didn't apply Popper's somewhat incomprehensible theories. Heck, no. The secret to Soros' great success, as he progressed throughout his career was very obviously the application of free-market business cycle economics to currency trading. It is quite clear as you look at Soros' trading career that he makes most of his money when the business cycle is heading down -- and that he understands paper-money business cycles -- and their propensity to crash and burn -- as well as anyone. He has literally made billions from his insights -- both now and in the 1990s, when he made his controversial and tremendously profitable bets against the British pound.

In fact he made so much money -- and hurt the pound so badly -- that he was apparently called in for a special audience with the Queen of England. (This is more than a decade ago now.) We would have liked to be a fly on the wall for that one! It must have been a royal version of "scared straight." For immediately, upon removal from the Queen's gaze, Soros began a career of intense governmental activism, suggesting over and over (and funding his newfound beliefs) that the only way to create a stable society was through intense, governmental regulatory activism. Riddles within riddles. At this time, and even earlier, Soros was the author of several absolutely incomprehensible books that attempted to explain his trading strategy in the most arcane and incomprehensible way possible. He made his former mentor Popper look positively simplistic, a very hard thing. But Soros himself is not so hard to figure out - if you examine his background, his free-market knowledge base and examine his trading strategies.

He is one of the best free-market traders of all time. And again, with this downturn, he has made literally billions, betting against various currencies. Sooner or later we think he will bet against the US dollar and go out in a blaze of glory having made billions more in a fortnight. Yes, George is surely energized and "exhilarated" as he says. It is his time once again, free-market trader that he is. He is in his glory because he is trading against a business cycle that is at its most accommodating for his style of money-making. But you will not learn that from George Soros! Read his books and you will come away shaking your head and wondering how the guy ever made a dime. Read his political manifestos about the necessity for an activist global government and you will, if you are a free-market thinker, wonder if he understands anything about economies at all. He is all "paper money" all of the time in his public belief structure. But his trading strategies betray an acute understanding of fiat money, of precious metals and the weaknesses of the current Western monetary system.

So the key to Soros is to understand that more than almost anyone, he successfully applies free-market business-cycle analysis (top down, obviously) to currency trading and makes and wins his biggest bets when inflation and fiat-money destructiveness are at their peak. He is a fascinating man, this George Soros. He dissembles insofar as his trading techniques are concerned (they are straight out of Hayek and Mises, though he pretends otherwise) and the powers-that-be apparently scared him so much after his victories over the pound that he set up a series of non-profits to support global government. You know, she scares us, too. We wonder what she told him.

Conclusion: Now you know a little more about free-market thinker George Soros, who made his many billions by applying Austrian business-cycle analysis to the marketplace. (Maybe you don't believe us -- OK, go investigate his background yourself; we think if you have an open mind you will come to conclusions similar to ours.) Like many powerful men, he hides behind obfuscation and his profit-making methods are other than he represents them to be. What are we to do with such clever men who understand the truth but are so circumspect and fearful that they will not speak it?

My socks DO match. They're the same thickness.

I Create Therefore I Am

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Re: Soros warns of global depression ... U.S. & China agree to co-operate
« Reply #552 on: April 15, 2009, 12:11:27 PM »

TheDailyBell - Issue 243 Thursday, April 02, 2009

Soros warns of global depression if G20 fails



If the G20 meeting of world leaders results in nothing but more hot air, billionaire George Soros says all bets are off - the global economy is heading for a huge meltdown. "That could push the world into depression. It's really a make-or-break occasion. That's why it's so important. The chances of a depression are quite high - even if that is averted, the recession will last a long time. Look, we are not going back to where we came from. In that sense it's going to last forever." While most investors are worried about the sorry state of the global markets, Soros finds the economic gloom-and-doom "exhilarating," and reckons a full-blown depression is inevitable. "I have to admit that actually I flourish, I'm more stimulated by the bust," Soros said in an interview with the Times of London. "On the one hand, there's the tremendous human suffering, which is very distressing. On the other hand, to be able to handle the situation is exhilarating." This recession, Soros said, is a "once-in-a-lifetime event," particularly in Britain and the United States.

Dominant Social Theme: A money master is gloomy.

Free-Market Analysis: George Soros sees the G20 meeting as a last gasp. Why are we not surprised? Soros never met a government conclave that he did not want to support, or not in the latter stages of his career anyway. And Soros, who is worth billions, has plenty of credibility. He is accurate about the markets, so shouldn't he know whereof he speaks?

If George says that the G20 is the last best hope of the global economy, then it must be, right? Let us peer a little deeper and examine what Hollywood calls "the back story." Maybe we will find some information not immediately obvious on first glance. Let us, like the Ghost of Christmas Past, travel back in time to gaze with wonder at a young George Soros being tutored at the London School of Economics by no less a free-market genius than FA Hayek himself. Yes, correct, Soros' mentor Karl Popper was best friends with Hayek, the great apprentice of the greatest of all free-market economists, Ludwig von Mises. Soros was thus well aware of Hayek from an early age, and aware of the Austrian School itself (and Mises, etc.), the great free-market, gold-based school of economics. And what did George Soros do when he graduated? Well, he didn't apply Popper's somewhat incomprehensible theories. Heck, no. The secret to Soros' great success, as he progressed throughout his career was very obviously the application of free-market business cycle economics to currency trading. It is quite clear as you look at Soros' trading career that he makes most of his money when the business cycle is heading down -- and that he understands paper-money business cycles -- and their propensity to crash and burn -- as well as anyone. He has literally made billions from his insights -- both now and in the 1990s, when he made his controversial and tremendously profitable bets against the British pound.

In fact he made so much money -- and hurt the pound so badly -- that he was apparently called in for a special audience with the Queen of England. (This is more than a decade ago now.) We would have liked to be a fly on the wall for that one! It must have been a royal version of "scared straight." For immediately, upon removal from the Queen's gaze, Soros began a career of intense governmental activism, suggesting over and over (and funding his newfound beliefs) that the only way to create a stable society was through intense, governmental regulatory activism. Riddles within riddles. At this time, and even earlier, Soros was the author of several absolutely incomprehensible books that attempted to explain his trading strategy in the most arcane and incomprehensible way possible. He made his former mentor Popper look positively simplistic, a very hard thing. But Soros himself is not so hard to figure out - if you examine his background, his free-market knowledge base and examine his trading strategies.

He is one of the best free-market traders of all time. And again, with this downturn, he has made literally billions, betting against various currencies. Sooner or later we think he will bet against the US dollar and go out in a blaze of glory having made billions more in a fortnight. Yes, George is surely energized and "exhilarated" as he says. It is his time once again, free-market trader that he is. He is in his glory because he is trading against a business cycle that is at its most accommodating for his style of money-making. But you will not learn that from George Soros! Read his books and you will come away shaking your head and wondering how the guy ever made a dime. Read his political manifestos about the necessity for an activist global government and you will, if you are a free-market thinker, wonder if he understands anything about economies at all. He is all "paper money" all of the time in his public belief structure. But his trading strategies betray an acute understanding of fiat money, of precious metals and the weaknesses of the current Western monetary system.

So the key to Soros is to understand that more than almost anyone, he successfully applies free-market business-cycle analysis (top down, obviously) to currency trading and makes and wins his biggest bets when inflation and fiat-money destructiveness are at their peak. He is a fascinating man, this George Soros. He dissembles insofar as his trading techniques are concerned (they are straight out of Hayek and Mises, though he pretends otherwise) and the powers-that-be apparently scared him so much after his victories over the pound that he set up a series of non-profits to support global government. You know, she scares us, too. We wonder what she told him.

Conclusion: Now you know a little more about free-market thinker George Soros, who made his many billions by applying Austrian business-cycle analysis to the marketplace. (Maybe you don't believe us -- OK, go investigate his background yourself; we think if you have an open mind you will come to conclusions similar to ours.) Like many powerful men, he hides behind obfuscation and his profit-making methods are other than he represents them to be. What are we to do with such clever men who understand the truth but are so circumspect and fearful that they will not speak it?


Hmmm, kinda strange: I was not aware that Soros - founder of Open Society and the like - was such a negative, hypocritical figure!

kamma niradha

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #553 on: April 16, 2009, 10:50:52 AM »

Completing a residency is a hard process that requires time and committment. You just can not allow such a great investment in your life slide away by not being 100% committed to studying for the exams and completing the residency. You've to pass the clearance process with the State board as well (not having been a drug addict in the past, not having been conducted for any drug-related crime, for the DEA licence). It requires much more committment than the law school process.


tired, I am assuming you've been really really tired when posting this, otherwise you would not have made quite a few errors - I would advise not to post under those circumstances! Why would you have to?

r o a m

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #554 on: April 20, 2009, 11:19:13 AM »

  • Albert Einstein, the lone wolf
  • Niels Bohr, the obsessive but gentlemanly father figure
  • Max Born, the anxious hypochondriac
  • Werner Heisenberg, the intensely ambitious one
  • Wolfgang Pauli, the sharp-tongued critic with a dark side
  • Paul Dirac, the silent Englishman
  • Erwin Schrodinger, the enthusiastic womanizer
  • Prince Louis de Broglie, the French aristocrat, and
  • Paul Ehrenfest, who was witness to it all.
  • Pascual Jordan, the ardent Aryan nationalist, came uninvited


Interesting post, wheres - and an even more interesting signature line! I'll try that ;)


Hahaha - you're so funny!

;)

mame

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Re: Soros warns of global depression ... U.S. & China agree to co-operate
« Reply #555 on: April 21, 2009, 11:05:13 AM »

TheDailyBell - Issue 243 Thursday, April 02, 2009

Soros warns of global depression if G20 fails



If the G20 meeting of world leaders results in nothing but more hot air, billionaire George Soros says all bets are off - the global economy is heading for a huge meltdown. "That could push the world into depression. It's really a make-or-break occasion. That's why it's so important. The chances of a depression are quite high - even if that is averted, the recession will last a long time. Look, we are not going back to where we came from. In that sense it's going to last forever." While most investors are worried about the sorry state of the global markets, Soros finds the economic gloom-and-doom "exhilarating," and reckons a full-blown depression is inevitable. "I have to admit that actually I flourish, I'm more stimulated by the bust," Soros said in an interview with the Times of London. "On the one hand, there's the tremendous human suffering, which is very distressing. On the other hand, to be able to handle the situation is exhilarating." This recession, Soros said, is a "once-in-a-lifetime event," particularly in Britain and the United States.

Dominant Social Theme: A money master is gloomy.

Free-Market Analysis: George Soros sees the G20 meeting as a last gasp. Why are we not surprised? Soros never met a government conclave that he did not want to support, or not in the latter stages of his career anyway. And Soros, who is worth billions, has plenty of credibility. He is accurate about the markets, so shouldn't he know whereof he speaks?

If George says that the G20 is the last best hope of the global economy, then it must be, right? Let us peer a little deeper and examine what Hollywood calls "the back story." Maybe we will find some information not immediately obvious on first glance. Let us, like the Ghost of Christmas Past, travel back in time to gaze with wonder at a young George Soros being tutored at the London School of Economics by no less a free-market genius than FA Hayek himself. Yes, correct, Soros' mentor Karl Popper was best friends with Hayek, the great apprentice of the greatest of all free-market economists, Ludwig von Mises. Soros was thus well aware of Hayek from an early age, and aware of the Austrian School itself (and Mises, etc.), the great free-market, gold-based school of economics. And what did George Soros do when he graduated? Well, he didn't apply Popper's somewhat incomprehensible theories. Heck, no. The secret to Soros' great success, as he progressed throughout his career was very obviously the application of free-market business cycle economics to currency trading. It is quite clear as you look at Soros' trading career that he makes most of his money when the business cycle is heading down -- and that he understands paper-money business cycles -- and their propensity to crash and burn -- as well as anyone. He has literally made billions from his insights -- both now and in the 1990s, when he made his controversial and tremendously profitable bets against the British pound.

In fact he made so much money -- and hurt the pound so badly -- that he was apparently called in for a special audience with the Queen of England. (This is more than a decade ago now.) We would have liked to be a fly on the wall for that one! It must have been a royal version of "scared straight." For immediately, upon removal from the Queen's gaze, Soros began a career of intense governmental activism, suggesting over and over (and funding his newfound beliefs) that the only way to create a stable society was through intense, governmental regulatory activism. Riddles within riddles. At this time, and even earlier, Soros was the author of several absolutely incomprehensible books that attempted to explain his trading strategy in the most arcane and incomprehensible way possible. He made his former mentor Popper look positively simplistic, a very hard thing. But Soros himself is not so hard to figure out - if you examine his background, his free-market knowledge base and examine his trading strategies.

He is one of the best free-market traders of all time. And again, with this downturn, he has made literally billions, betting against various currencies. Sooner or later we think he will bet against the US dollar and go out in a blaze of glory having made billions more in a fortnight. Yes, George is surely energized and "exhilarated" as he says. It is his time once again, free-market trader that he is. He is in his glory because he is trading against a business cycle that is at its most accommodating for his style of money-making. But you will not learn that from George Soros! Read his books and you will come away shaking your head and wondering how the guy ever made a dime. Read his political manifestos about the necessity for an activist global government and you will, if you are a free-market thinker, wonder if he understands anything about economies at all. He is all "paper money" all of the time in his public belief structure. But his trading strategies betray an acute understanding of fiat money, of precious metals and the weaknesses of the current Western monetary system.

So the key to Soros is to understand that more than almost anyone, he successfully applies free-market business-cycle analysis (top down, obviously) to currency trading and makes and wins his biggest bets when inflation and fiat-money destructiveness are at their peak. He is a fascinating man, this George Soros. He dissembles insofar as his trading techniques are concerned (they are straight out of Hayek and Mises, though he pretends otherwise) and the powers-that-be apparently scared him so much after his victories over the pound that he set up a series of non-profits to support global government. You know, she scares us, too. We wonder what she told him.

Conclusion: Now you know a little more about free-market thinker George Soros, who made his many billions by applying Austrian business-cycle analysis to the marketplace. (Maybe you don't believe us -- OK, go investigate his background yourself; we think if you have an open mind you will come to conclusions similar to ours.) Like many powerful men, he hides behind obfuscation and his profit-making methods are other than he represents them to be. What are we to do with such clever men who understand the truth but are so circumspect and fearful that they will not speak it?


Hmmm, kinda strange: I was not aware that Soros - founder of Open Society and the like - was such a negative, hypocritical figure!


Oh, I Create, you've got to be kidding me!

jer

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #556 on: April 22, 2009, 11:02:48 PM »
with the economy in the crapper in some areas of the country, i'm glad i'm in law school since i left lockheed martin for law school and they have been laying people off since i left.
as far as attending smu for law school, i'm sure everyone has positive and negative things to say about their law school. there are a lot of negative things i could say about smu, but they have a good reputation, especially in TX (where i'll probably stay) and people from smu love to hire other people from smu, so they have excellent networking.

part v. whole

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Re: 1 year later....still glad u went to law school?
« Reply #557 on: April 23, 2009, 11:23:43 AM »

Wow - great post AmyL! Good for ya!

Love, and only love, will save the world!


so, Luzhi, still thinking Love, and only love, will save the world?


I am not Luzhi, cossetta, but I answer "Yes" to your inquiry: I thought that Love, and only love, will save the world on December 17 and I still do. I refuse to believe that hate and destruction will change the world for better, even when it appears that they sometimes do.


Sagapo, could you give us an example when "it appears that hate and destruction change the world for better"?


graft, don't you think you're putting "Sagapo" on the spot with your question?


Why cpl?
Borrow money from pessimists - they don't expect it back.

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Re: Genetic Engineering - Can You Patent Life???
« Reply #558 on: May 05, 2009, 03:19:16 PM »

[...] At the time, 4 known species of oil-metabolizing bacteria were known to exist, but when introduced into an oil spill, competed with each other, limiting the amount of crude oil that they degraded. The genes necessary to degrade oil were carried on plasmids, which could be transferred among species. By irradiating the transformed organism with UV light after plasmid transfer, Chakrabarty discovered a method for genetic cross-linking that fixed all four plasmid genes in place and produced a new, stable, bacteria species (now called Burkholderia) capable of consuming oil 1-2 orders of magnitude faster than the previous four strains of oil-eating microbes. The new microbe, which Chakrabarty called "multi-plasmid hydrocarbon-degrading Pseudomonas," could digest about two-thirds of the hydrocarbons that would be found in a typical oil spill.

[...]


Here it is a primer on plasmids:

http://www.mcgill.ca/files/microimm/466_gatignol_06.pdf
If you tell a joke in the forest, but nobody laughs, was it a joke?

Walter Ego

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Plasmids
« Reply #559 on: May 05, 2009, 07:22:45 PM »

Here it is a primer on plasmids:

http://www.mcgill.ca/files/microimm/466_gatignol_06.pdf


Viral vectors, you meant, didn't you? 'Cause a vector is a DNA molecule used as a vehicle to transfer foreign genetic material into another cell. The 4 major types of vectors are plasmids, bacteriophages and other viruses, cosmids, and artificial chromosomes. Common to all engineered vectors are an origin of replication, a multicloning site, and a selectable marker.



Plasmids are double-stranded generally circular DNA sequences that are capable of automatically replicating in a host cell. Plasmid vectors at a minimum consist of an origin of replication that allows for semi-independent replication of the plasmid in the host and also the transgene insert. Modern plasmids generally have many more features, notably including a "multiple cloning site" which includes nucleotide overhangs for insertion of an insert, and multiple restriction enzyme consensus sites to either side of the insert. In the case of plasmids utilized as transcription vectors, incubating bacteria with plasmids generates hundreds or thousands of copies of the vector within the bacteria in hours, and the vectors can be extracted from the bacteria, and the multiple cloning site can be restricted by restriction enzymes to excise the hundredfold or thousandfold amplified insert. These plasmid transcription vectors characteristically lack crucial sequences that code for polyadenylation sequences and translation termination sequences in translated mRNAs, making expression of transcription vectors impossible.
There is no Santa Claus. I'm Santa Claus.