Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea  (Read 59675 times)

AnneBoleyn

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 32
    • View Profile
Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #170 on: March 06, 2008, 12:08:39 AM »
tag

jensa

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 6
    • View Profile
Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #171 on: March 06, 2008, 02:16:37 PM »

Babies don't need a vacation, but I still see them at the beach... it pisses me off! I'll go over to a little baby and say 'What are you doing here? You haven't worked a day in your life!'


lol GSSG i know what ya mean! ;)

Dundee

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #172 on: March 18, 2008, 12:30:26 PM »
There's a worm addicted to eating grape leaves. Suddenly, he wakes up, call it grace, whatever, something wakes him, and he's no longer a worm. He is the entire vineyard, and the orchard too, the fruit, the trunks, a growing wisdom and joy that dosen't need to devour.

cen

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 6
    • View Profile
Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #173 on: March 18, 2008, 02:55:54 PM »
In other words, Dundee, the key to success just isn't self-improvement ;)

J 12

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #174 on: March 18, 2008, 03:34:02 PM »
LOL Cen, I know what ya mean! ;)

becky

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 49
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #175 on: April 03, 2008, 02:09:46 PM »

There's a worm addicted to eating grape leaves. Suddenly, he wakes up, call it grace, whatever, something wakes him, and he's no longer a worm. He is the entire vineyard, and the orchard too, the fruit, the trunks, a growing wisdom and joy that dosen't need to devour.


I would be interested in Dundee's own interpretation, though...

ismile

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #176 on: April 05, 2008, 05:04:17 PM »

Way back in 1827, the mathematician Möbius, of "Möbius strip" fame, realized that a trip through the fourth dimension could turn an object into its own mirror image. To understand, we return to the two-dimensional analogy. Take a symbol which looks wrong in a mirror, such as an N, and cut it out of a piece of paper. If you set it down on a table, you'll find there's no way to turn the N into the backwards N just by sliding the paper around the tabletop. But if you allow yourself a third dimension, you can simply lift up the N, flip it over, and place it back on the table. [...]


I remember this name from the Theory of the Mobius -- a twist in the fabric of space, where time becomes a loop, where time becomes a loop, where time becomes a loop, where time becomes a loop, where time becomes a loop, where time becomes a loop, where time becomes a loop... When we reach that point, whatever happened will happen again.

superpartner

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 9
    • View Profile
Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #177 on: April 16, 2008, 01:48:45 PM »

Looks like someone can't make up his mind .. bad ass, good ass, bad ass, good ass... ;)


'He loves me, he loves me not...'


:)

slightlybehind

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 11
    • View Profile
Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #178 on: April 17, 2008, 11:03:12 AM »

[...] String theory basically pretends it isn't there. [...]
 

String theory is quite interesting; it makes the string one of the main objects of study. A string is an object with a one-dimensional spatial extent, unlike an elementary particle which is zero-dimensional, or point-like. By postulating this one-dimensional structure, many desirable features of a more fundamental theory of physics automatically emerge. Most notably, almost any theory of strings consistent with quantum mechanics must also contain quantum gravity, which had not been described consistently prior to string theory.

Strings can be either open or closed. A closed string is a string that has no end-points, and therefore is topologically equivalent to a circle. An open string, on the other hand, has two end-points and is topologically equivalent to a line interval. Not all string theories contain open strings, but every theory must contain closed strings, as interactions between open strings can always result in closed strings. The oldest superstring theory containing open strings was type I string theory.

Since its birth as the dual resonance model which described the strongly interacting hadrons as strings, the term string theory has changed to include any of a group of related superstring theories and larger frameworks such as M-theory, which unite them. A shared property of all these theories is the holographic principle. String theorists have not yet completely described these theories, nor have they determined if or how these theories relate to the physical universe. The elegance and flexibility of the approach, however, and a number of qualitative similarities with more traditional physical models, have led many physicists to suspect that such a connection is possible. In particular, string theory may be a way to "unify" the known natural forces (gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear and strong nuclear) by describing them with the same set of equations, as described in the theory of everything. (BTW, Theory of everything (TOE) is a hypothetical theory of theoretical physics that fully explains and links together all known physical phenomena. Initially, the term was used with an ironic connotation to refer to various overgeneralized theories. For example, a great-grandfather of Ijon Tichy — a character from a cycle of Stanisław Lem's science fiction stories of 1960s — was known to work on the "General Theory of Everything". Over time, the term stuck in popularizations of quantum physics to describe a theory that would unify or explain through a single model the theories of all fundamental interactions of nature. There have been many theories of everything proposed by theoretical physicists over the last century, but none have been confirmed experimentally. The primary problem in producing a TOE is that the accepted theories of quantum mechanics and general relativity are hard to combine.)

ex nihilo

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 11
    • View Profile
Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #179 on: April 21, 2008, 02:20:32 PM »


'He loves me, he loves me not...'


LOL super! ;)
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.