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Author Topic: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea  (Read 58792 times)

sifr

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The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« on: May 29, 2006, 07:40:02 PM »
It may well be the most potent force in the universe. The Greeks were scared to death of it. Aristotle wouldn't permit it (and the Catholic Church's vice-grip on Aristotelianism held Western science and mathematics back for centuries). But this force does not discriminate; it delights in tripping up secular science as well. Certain forms of mathematics must ignore it in order to work. String theory basically pretends it isn't there. It is, as stated on the book jacket, a timebomb ticking in the heart of astrophysics.

Zero.

helenof

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Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2006, 07:50:01 PM »
Indeed, zero is a very curious number. How can nothing be something?

Everything can be divided into an infinite amount of pieces, but although the size of the pieces decreases as the amount of pieces increases, the sizes will always approach zero, but never hit it. How can zero exist as a number then? Zero began as a place holder in Babylonian and Mayan societies. It was accepted as a place holder in some societies, while rejected in others. Zero does not conform to the laws of mathematics, and therefore became a difficult concept to accept. Since it did not fit in with laws, it could destroy all logic.

watchtell

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Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2006, 09:10:45 PM »
Wow, cool thread, tagging it.

Budlaw

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Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2006, 11:01:53 PM »
It may well be the most potent force in the universe. The Greeks were scared to death of it. Aristotle wouldn't permit it (and the Catholic Church's vice-grip on Aristotelianism held Western science and mathematics back for centuries). But this force does not discriminate; it delights in tripping up secular science as well. Certain forms of mathematics must ignore it in order to work. String theory basically pretends it isn't there. It is, as stated on the book jacket, a timebomb ticking in the heart of astrophysics.

Zero.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/067088457X/104-8001793-8914300?v=glance&n=283155

Geez you're very original as well....f-ing idiots.

list

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Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2006, 08:33:53 AM »
Awesome thread!

channel

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Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2006, 06:55:44 PM »
When the hell did this thread and the other go existential? Comparing law school to institutionalized violence and drawing a conclusion that they both

antoin

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Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2006, 07:31:54 AM »
It is said that Sisyphus, being near to death, rashly wanted to test his wife's love. He ordered her to cast his unburied body into the middle of the public square. Sisyphus woke up in the underworld. And there, annoyed by an obedience so contrary to human love, he obtained from Pluto permission to return to earth in order to chastise his wife. But when he had seen again the face of this world, enjoyed water and sun, warm stones and the sea, he no longer wanted to go back to the infernal darkness. Recall, signs of anger, warnings were to no avail. Many years he lived facing the curve of the gulf, the sparkling see, and the smiles of the earth. A decree of the gods was necessary. Mercury came and seized the impudent man by the collar and, snatching him from his joys, led him forcibly back to the underworld, where his rock was ready for him.

You have already grasped that Sisyphus is the absurd hero. He is, as much through his passion as through his torture. His scorn of the gods, his hatred of death, and his passion for life won him that unspeakable penalty in which the whole being is exerted towards accomplishing nothing. That is the price that must be paid for the passions of this earth.. Nothing is told us about Sisyphus in the underworld. Myths are made for the imagination to breathe life into them. As for this myth, one sees merely the whole effort of a body straining to raise a large stone, to roll it and push it up a slope a hundred times over; one sees the face screwed up, the cheek tight against the stone, the shoulder bracing the clay-covered mass, the foot wedging it, the fresh start with arms outstretched, the wholly human security of two earth-clotted hands. At the very end of his long effort measured by skyless space and time without depth, the purpose is achieved. Then Sisyphus watches the stone rush down in a few moments toward that lower world whence he will have to push it up again toward the summit. He goes back down to the plain. It is during that return, that pause, that Sisyphus interests me. A face that toils so close to stones is already stone itself! I see that man going back down with a heavy yet measured step towards the torment to which he will never know the end. That hour like a breathing-space which returns as surely as his suffering, that is the hour of consciousness. At each of those moments when he leaves the heights and gradually sinks towards the lairs of the gods, he is superior to his fate. He is stronger than his rock.

If this myth is tragic, that is because its hero is conscious. Where would his torture be, indeed, if at every step the hope of succeeding upheld him? The workman of today works every day of his life at the same tasks, and his fate is no less absurd. But is tragic only at the rare moments when it becomes conscious. Sisyphus, proletarian of the gods, powerless and rebellious, knows the whole extent of his wretched condition: it is of what he thinks of during his descent. The lucidity that was to constitute his torture at the same time crowns his victory. There is no fate that cannot be surmounted by scorn.

cerealkiller

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Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2006, 08:26:15 PM »
 You're a true philosopher. Shall I call you Albert--Albert Camus?

buttlaw

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Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2006, 09:42:34 PM »
Indeed - plagerism is a crime!

Budlaw

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Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2006, 09:53:54 PM »
It is. Nice name by the way.

Jackass