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Author Topic: law review v. subject journal  (Read 1082 times)

orky13

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law review v. subject journal
« on: May 15, 2006, 09:51:40 AM »
So I've noticed many of the schools offer not only a law review but also one or several specialized journals "Journal of Dispute Resolution" or "Environmental Law Journal" etc. I wonder if there is a difference in prestige upon graduating. Does being on a specialized journal carry the same weight as law review, or should one stick to the traditional review for the association: GREAT STUDENT to carry through? If so, is it feasible to be on both a specialized journal and the Law Review? I find myself interested in some of these journals, more so than the general journals themselves, but I want to make the best career move possible.  :-[
Thanks in advance for your responses!
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Lenny

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Re: law review v. subject journal
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2006, 10:03:04 AM »
Unfortunately, law review is seen as more prestigious than secondary or subject matter journals.  At some schools, this is because the selection criteria is different - law review factors in grades and the other journals don't.  But, in general, the profession does have a hierarchy of journal memberships.  That said, there are plenty of members of those secondary journals that will get the same clerkships and jobs as the law review people.  As for what interests you, remember that if you make law review, you can write on whatever interests you.

bobbykurva

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Re: law review v. subject journal
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2006, 10:54:48 AM »
At some schools, this is because the selection criteria is different - law review factors in grades and the other journals don't.  But, in general, the profession does have a hierarchy of journal memberships. 

I agree with the above posters claim that Law Review is more prestigious than other journals, but what about schools that offer write-ons a spot on Law Review? Law Review can't be solely about grades unless the school requires a certain class rank to be eligible for a write-on spot?

dmitrik4

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Re: law review v. subject journal
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2006, 12:05:56 PM »
every journal/review promulgates its own criteria.  some allow students to grade on and avoid the writing competition entirely (something i disagree with); others consider both.  there are probably some that only consider the writing; none that i know of, however.

some journals/reviews (i'm using the terms interchangeably) use an exisitng writing sample (such as a 1L memo or brief); others create a hypothetical fact scenario from scratch.

typically, the general review/journal at a school is considered the most prestigious, and in many ways it's a self-fulfilling thing in the same way a school's prestige begets more prestige.  and similarly, that doesn't mean that there aren't comparable opportunities springing from, or comparable students working on, subject-specific journals.  i'd say the biggest divide would be between "print" and "online-only" journals; print journals are typically cited more often and thus carry more weight.  some journals offer both online and print content.

shaz

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Re: law review v. subject journal
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2006, 02:22:13 AM »
i believe lewis and clark's environmental journal is ranked higher than the traditional law review.
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orky13

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Re: law review v. subject journal
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2006, 10:48:21 AM »
Good to know! I know their enviro. program is #1 in the nation.  That would make sense
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