Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: how long take your guys to prepare LSAT  (Read 4578 times)

Italian2L

  • Guest
Re: how long take your guys to prepare LSAT
« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2006, 04:31:52 PM »
I didn't prep at all...  Not one book, I only took the practice LSAT at my UG, and then one practice test.  My justification for this is that everyone can prep, and you can drastically improve your score between 5 and 13 points for your natural ability.  The next step is to apply to your target schools, and get into the best one you can, meaning you will probably be sub 25% LSAT if you have a high GPA or vice versa in some manner, but take the best school.  However, I feel that this will place you in a very competetive environment, as you will have students that scored much better, and it may put you at a disadvantage.  My plan is to probably attend a school where I feel I will be in a solid position to fight for the top spots in my class if I apply myself.  But thats just my take on it. 

Okay, this is just beyond stupid. As other posters have pointed out this statement is based on more than one flawed assumption to begin with. However, even if we were to assume the accuracy of those assumptions your choice still does not make any sense in light of the fact that a little bit of prep time could easily turn into scholarship $$$ at the lower ranked school at which you think you will have a competitive advantage.

From personal experience, I prepped for the LSAT and ended up with a 166, a 6 point improvement from my pre-prep scores, attended a school that gave me a 100% tuition scholarship, lost that scholarship after 1L because of the fierce TTT competition, and am finally going to get it back for 3L only after busting my ass much harder than any of my 2L peers this year. Take it from me, when it comes to anything having to do with law school, not working hard is never a good option because the consequences can be a lot more severe than you might expect. My arrogance cost me $24,000 in the long run. If you are the type of person who chooses not to work hard for the LSAT just because you want to have a lower level of competition, you will likely be the kind of person who just does what is necessary to get by when you are in law school, and that will land you somewhere around 50% class ranking at best.

You went to a TTT with a 166?! I can't believe it!!!

Yeah, I know. I totally underachieved in sending out apps. The highest ranked school I applied to was Tulane and they gave me a 50% scholarship. In the end I just couldn't resist the idea of finishing law school with 0 debt. The whole prestige thing didn't really hit me hard since I have never planned on doing big law and I grew up in Alexandria around plenty of successful lawyers that went to TTTs. In any case, I feel like I've recieved a damn good education here and have met a lot of great people. 

Leaf2001br

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 526
  • My two cents.
    • AOL Instant Messenger - Leaf2001br
    • View Profile
    • Isaac Online
    • Email
Re: how long take your guys to prepare LSAT
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2006, 08:38:54 PM »
Good for you man.  I understand people have different goals and many want to be sure they get the best education possible, but all the droning on about rankings and prestige is shallow at best.  It's like talking about how much your salary is compared to so-and-so's salary.  There is a reason people don't generally spout that kind of B.S.  Namely, having a little class and respect for others who may not share your values.  Not to mention that it sometimes reaks of a little latent insecurity and a need to be appreciated by others.  A 166 is a 166 and chances are you'll be fine whatever path you take. 
"What is Legal?  What is Illegal?  What is 'Barely Legal'?"  - Ali G

Happy_Weasel

  • LSD Obsessed
  • *****
  • Posts: 5547
  • Me and Gir, the happy weasel.
    • MSN Messenger - ominusdemon2@msn.com
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: how long take your guys to prepare LSAT
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2006, 01:42:35 AM »
What's interesting about me is that the only school I really saw myself at was Wyoming. Sure I had dreams of SU,UM,Case and Northeastern, but Wyoming was the only practical choice. Knowing this, I only prepared for Wyoming and got a 156, which was better than the 153 I was aiming for. I think if I was serious about CUB or UD, I could have pulled off a 162 or 163. I only knew about The LSAT since about the May before I took it and didn't figure out how it worked until August or September and then I stopped studying in January.  :-\ However, I guess if I can get into the 70s%tile @ Wyoming, it won't matter because I am only really interested in Denver and I can always get an LLM.

nate

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 34
    • View Profile
Re: how long take your guys to prepare LSAT
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2006, 02:23:04 AM »
i honestly believe that not aiming for the highest score that i could get was one of the biggest mistakes that i have ever made and (because the academic world is so important to me) probably one of the biggest i will ever make.

instead of picking "target" scores based on certain schools, i should have just aimed for a 180 and done my very best to get there. i do love my current school where i am now a 1L, yet i often have to wonder what would have happened had i tried to do the best that i possibly could have, as opposed to just doing what i thought i needed to do.
GW

Kazzzzzzzzaaam

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: how long take your guys to prepare LSAT
« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2006, 11:57:49 AM »
I didn't prep at all...  Not one book, I only took the practice LSAT at my UG, and then one practice test.  My justification for this is that everyone can prep, and you can drastically improve your score between 5 and 13 points for your natural ability.  The next step is to apply to your target schools, and get into the best one you can, meaning you will probably be sub 25% LSAT if you have a high GPA or vice versa in some manner, but take the best school.  However, I feel that this will place you in a very competetive environment, as you will have students that scored much better, and it may put you at a disadvantage.  My plan is to probably attend a school where I feel I will be in a solid position to fight for the top spots in my class if I apply myself.  But thats just my take on it. 

So... if most people can (and do) prep and improve their score (most schools, like U Chicago, even tell students to prep) - than you are saying that if you ALSO prepped and scored the same, you would be at a disadvantage? It seems to me that your arguement only makes sense if you make the assumption that all, or at lease the majority, of students at all schools do not prep for the LSAT. If this were true, then you could likely assume prepping to up your score would have you at a disadvantage.

However, since most people prep for the LSAT, to NOT prep, does not keep you on even footing with students at your future school - if anything, it places you at a personal disadvantage at a school you could have done much better than.


As to the OP, people prep different times. I spent about one and a half months, some people spend a full year, and some people do not prep at all. It's whatever amount you feel is worth the payoff in terms of schools/scholarships you might recieve.

You misinterpreted the reasoning I had for not prepping, so I will spell it out again:  Lets say there are two students, with identical GPA's, who both score 165, and are eligible for the same T30-70 schools.  The first prepped constantly for the LSAT, raising his initial score of 156 to the 163-166 practice range with consistency, and took the LSAT for those results.  The second student did not prep at all, and got a 165 based only upon his natural ability.  Had he prepped he could have gotten into a top school, but instead he took the LSAT based solely on his ability.  There are two possibilities that each student could then pursue: get into the T30ish school where they each would be around 25th percentile, and they would find many students with similar numbers, but the one with the 165 natural easily could have been above that 25th percentile with prepping.  Had he chosen to prep, he would have gotten some $$$ too probably.  The other step would be to go to a school where the score was representative of a higher proportion of those admitted, maybe even 75th percentile, and they each could probably receive $$$.  But since almost everyone DOES prep, then those people at the same lower ranked school, with similar index scores at the top of those admitted, not only would be getting the $$$, but would represent the top LSAT scores.  But the person who didn't prep, and did so off natural ability alone, would have an advantage over all those who got the same top scores with prepping. 
I guess it depends on where you want to go to school in the long run, but based on my friend who did this and took a full ride to a local school, and was 1st in his class 1L, took a great summer associateship, and is now EIC of LR is comfortable with his decision.  In comparison, another friend of mine squeaked into Emory, because he had an excellent GPA from a TTT undergrad, but prepped all summer of Junior year for the October test, improved drastically, and got was admitted.  He was in the bottom LSAT numbers of those admitted, and although worked his arse off, he was bottom 1/3 of his class 1L, took a crappy associateship paying $14/hr because he needed a paying internship to start knocking his principal off all his loans, and is stuck at a smaller firm in Atlanta this summer, which although is paying much nicer, means he is still in Atlanta, and his whole plan was to attend the best school he could and return to practice in Philly. 
Everyone is different, and everyone will approach the LSAT and the application process in different ways.  I may even prep for a month and take the June test, but I'm not trying to just squeak into the best school I can, because I know where I want to live and practice, and will try to gain a competitve edge.  This was just my $.02, but don't fail to recognize that one of the most essential abilities a lawyer needs to hone is a strategic approach to a situation that has multiple outcomes.  Look at LS as a 3 year Bar Review course, with the application process as your first implementation of your natural strategic focus, and accept the fact that the results will be drastic either way, and that it is a huge decision.

Italian2L

  • Guest
Re: how long take your guys to prepare LSAT
« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2006, 01:08:25 PM »
"but don't fail to recognize that one of the most essential abilities a lawyer needs to hone is a strategic approach to a situation that has multiple outcomes."


Okay, I find this all very frustrating. Deciding not to prep is NOT a strategic choice. The only reason that I can see for not prepping would be to slack off. You gain absolutely nothing from not prepping, except for extra time to get drunk/whack off/watch tv, or whatever it is that you do for fun. Unless of course there is something important that you think you could be doing with this extra time, but I will assume there isn't since you have given no indication otherwise.

Look at it this way, you say that there are 'multiple outcomes' depending on whether or not you prep. This is misleading, because these 'outcomes' are in no way mutually exclusive. One choice, not prepping, will get you a limited amount of options. The second choice, prepping, will get you ALL OF THOSE SAME OPTIONS plus MORE. Therefore, the only possible 'strategic choice' that you can make is to potentially shoot yourself in the foot by limiting your possible options.

If you prep and improve your score, you can still go to a school at which your natural ability would have put you at 25% or 75% or whatever you want, but since you prepped you will likely get more $$$ at that same school. Are you getting this yet?

Now, if you are absolutely positive about where you want to go to school already and are also positive that you will be able to get a full ride at that school based on your natural ability alone, then I can understand why you wouldn't want to waste your time prepping. That is not really a 'strategic choice' though, since the foregone option would have in no way hindered your ability to obtain the desired outcome.

Leaf2001br

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 526
  • My two cents.
    • AOL Instant Messenger - Leaf2001br
    • View Profile
    • Isaac Online
    • Email
Re: how long take your guys to prepare LSAT
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2006, 12:26:28 AM »
I think the scholarship possibility is a good point.

Other than that however, if you already KNOW where you are planning to attend (family obligations, desire to stay at home, etc.) I disagree that time spent prepping cannot be time wasted.  Italian2L's theory assumes the necessary premise that one's life exclusively consists of drinking and masturbating.  This may be the last freedom to travel, see, do, or relax for quite some time.  Maybe even work to save up some money.  While I certainly think this only applies to a very few limited cases, there are situations where prepping might conceivably not be the only acceptable option.  I guess I just like to pick on absolute arguments.  But like you said, the possibility of scholarship money is definitely worth thinking about.

Out of curiosity though, do you apply the same logic to law school itself?  Personally, I wouldn't trade the precious few drinks or jerk offs I've had for almost anything.
"What is Legal?  What is Illegal?  What is 'Barely Legal'?"  - Ali G

Italian2L

  • Guest
Re: how long take your guys to prepare LSAT
« Reply #17 on: April 21, 2006, 02:55:36 AM »
I think the scholarship possibility is a good point.

Other than that however, if you already KNOW where you are planning to attend (family obligations, desire to stay at home, etc.) I disagree that time spent prepping cannot be time wasted.  Italian2L's theory assumes the necessary premise that one's life exclusively consists of drinking and masturbating.  This may be the last freedom to travel, see, do, or relax for quite some time.  Maybe even work to save up some money.  While I certainly think this only applies to a very few limited cases, there are situations where prepping might conceivably not be the only acceptable option.  I guess I just like to pick on absolute arguments.  But like you said, the possibility of scholarship money is definitely worth thinking about.

Out of curiosity though, do you apply the same logic to law school itself?  Personally, I wouldn't trade the precious few drinks or jerk offs I've had for almost anything.

I totally agree with this. The only reason that I was dealing in absolutes is because I felt as though it was the only way that I could get the OP to understand what I was trying to say. Obviously priorities must be weighed at some point, and the truth is that I personally find drinking and masturbation to be very important for my mental health. Hence me being awake at 3am.

That being said, I was really just trying to point out that being unprepared for the LSAT is not a strategic choice when the only relevant factor is which law school one plans to attend, which is the context given by the OP. If there are other important factors going into OP's decision, I don't see how anybody could be expected to give helpful input without that context.

Kazzzzzzzzaaam

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: how long take your guys to prepare LSAT
« Reply #18 on: April 21, 2006, 09:43:53 AM »
I think the scholarship possibility is a good point.

Other than that however, if you already KNOW where you are planning to attend (family obligations, desire to stay at home, etc.) I disagree that time spent prepping cannot be time wasted.  Italian2L's theory assumes the necessary premise that one's life exclusively consists of drinking and masturbating.  This may be the last freedom to travel, see, do, or relax for quite some time.  Maybe even work to save up some money.  While I certainly think this only applies to a very few limited cases, there are situations where prepping might conceivably not be the only acceptable option.  I guess I just like to pick on absolute arguments.  But like you said, the possibility of scholarship money is definitely worth thinking about.

Out of curiosity though, do you apply the same logic to law school itself?  Personally, I wouldn't trade the precious few drinks or jerk offs I've had for almost anything.

I totally agree with this. The only reason that I was dealing in absolutes is because I felt as though it was the only way that I could get the OP to understand what I was trying to say. Obviously priorities must be weighed at some point, and the truth is that I personally find drinking and masturbation to be very important for my mental health. Hence me being awake at 3am.

That being said, I was really just trying to point out that being unprepared for the LSAT is not a strategic choice when the only relevant factor is which law school one plans to attend, which is the context given by the OP. If there are other important factors going into OP's decision, I don't see how anybody could be expected to give helpful input without that context.

I guess it is a choice of what you would be doing instead of prepping.  For myself, I have been practicing for the GMAT, since although that score doesn't matter as much as the LSAT for a dual program, if I chose to transfer to say, Penn, which is out of my reach incoming, but not as a transfer (thanks F#%kers at USNWR), I would be able to get an MBA from Warton as well if I get my score within range.  My other friend who is incoming, 'em decided to go backpacking throughout Europe after graduating in January.  He took the Dec. LSAT, didn't prep since he was finishing up his Sr. Thesis, and not only turned down prepping altogether, is taking a year off to go through Europe, and then a 6 month fellowship in Firenze.  To me, that is going to be more rewarding then LSAT prepping.  As for myself, I've been doing paralegal work to the tune of 60-70 hrs. a week, and have made enough to nearly cover my first year in its entirety, plus gotten hands on W.E.  Some of the other kids that started with me last June, and prepped hard for the LSAT are going to some of the same schools next fall, a couple got some $$$, but I have saved up enough, and gotten enough hands on experience to justify not studying.  I agree with what you mean as if you had prepped, you'd have the same options and then some, but I really don't see why people get so bent out of shape for the test.  After 1L, your LSAT will never again be of any consequence, yet what you did in that time before you took it as a young 20something will never be recaptured again. 

Italian2L

  • Guest
Re: how long take your guys to prepare LSAT
« Reply #19 on: April 21, 2006, 10:48:28 AM »
I think the scholarship possibility is a good point.

Other than that however, if you already KNOW where you are planning to attend (family obligations, desire to stay at home, etc.) I disagree that time spent prepping cannot be time wasted.  Italian2L's theory assumes the necessary premise that one's life exclusively consists of drinking and masturbating.  This may be the last freedom to travel, see, do, or relax for quite some time.  Maybe even work to save up some money.  While I certainly think this only applies to a very few limited cases, there are situations where prepping might conceivably not be the only acceptable option.  I guess I just like to pick on absolute arguments.  But like you said, the possibility of scholarship money is definitely worth thinking about.

Out of curiosity though, do you apply the same logic to law school itself?  Personally, I wouldn't trade the precious few drinks or jerk offs I've had for almost anything.

I totally agree with this. The only reason that I was dealing in absolutes is because I felt as though it was the only way that I could get the OP to understand what I was trying to say. Obviously priorities must be weighed at some point, and the truth is that I personally find drinking and masturbation to be very important for my mental health. Hence me being awake at 3am.

That being said, I was really just trying to point out that being unprepared for the LSAT is not a strategic choice when the only relevant factor is which law school one plans to attend, which is the context given by the OP. If there are other important factors going into OP's decision, I don't see how anybody could be expected to give helpful input without that context.

I guess it is a choice of what you would be doing instead of prepping.  For myself, I have been practicing for the GMAT, since although that score doesn't matter as much as the LSAT for a dual program, if I chose to transfer to say, Penn, which is out of my reach incoming, but not as a transfer (thanks F#%kers at USNWR), I would be able to get an MBA from Warton as well if I get my score within range.  My other friend who is incoming, 'em decided to go backpacking throughout Europe after graduating in January.  He took the Dec. LSAT, didn't prep since he was finishing up his Sr. Thesis, and not only turned down prepping altogether, is taking a year off to go through Europe, and then a 6 month fellowship in Firenze.  To me, that is going to be more rewarding then LSAT prepping.  As for myself, I've been doing paralegal work to the tune of 60-70 hrs. a week, and have made enough to nearly cover my first yeut of shape for the test.  After 1L, your LSAT will never again be of any consequence, yet what you did in that time before you took it as a young 20something will never ar in its entirety, plus gotten hands on W.E.  Some of the other kids that started with me last June, and prepped hard for the LSAT are going to some of the same schools next fall, a couple got some $$$, but I have saved up enough, and gotten enough hands on experience to justify not studying.  I agree with what you mean as if you had prepped, you'd have the same options and then some, but I really don't see why people get so bent obe recaptured again. 

Yes. Now you are making sense. I can see how not prepping is a strategic choice in light of these other options. Before you just tried to justify it based on your desire to go to a school at which you would have a competitive advantage.

Now, I must retire from this thread and do some outlining. My favorite time of the year has arrived as of this morning.