Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: .....  (Read 12024 times)

............

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 26
    • View Profile
.....
« on: April 11, 2006, 10:03:39 AM »
 .....

littlemonkey

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 10
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: practicing law as a non-U.S. citizen
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2006, 11:15:40 PM »
Hey,
  this is a bit of a general enquiry, but hopefully someone can help:
  as an international student (from England), it is possible for me to go to law school in America on a J1 (student) Visa. However, for this visa you are supposed to to say that you intend to return to your home country after completing your studies.
  for any non-U.S.citizen hoping to work (in any job) in America, it is very difficult to gain a visa that will let you work. Essentially, your employer is supposed to be able to prove that they are employing you because they cannot find a suitable American to do the job.
   ... my goal is to go to law school in America, and then live in America the rest of my life, working as a lawyer.
   I have yet to research it properly, but it would seem to me that even if I went to a good law school in America, and then passed the bar, it would be very hard to find employment because of the visa issue.
   ... does anyone have any thoughts, or know of any international students who have gone on to practice law in America?
   thanks in advance.

what make you decide to work in USA? Is it not good enough living in England?
I 'm also a intenational student who want to study law  in America,but i think i will return to my country after my graduation. Because there are my family,friends and my lover.I cann't imagine the lonely life in a foreign country.That's my own opinions.

SymphonyOfDreams

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 20
    • View Profile
Re: practicing law as a non-U.S. citizen
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2006, 05:02:46 PM »
Hehehe actually... I'm considering this same issue too but it would be more difficult for me since I would apply for the student visa to do a masters wich lasts less...

Hey you can do what I'm planning to do... get married to an american... that seems to work, hehehe  ;D

giraffe205

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 278
    • View Profile
Re: practicing law as a non-U.S. citizen
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2006, 01:22:39 AM »
I think marriage is probably your best bet. I have heard of law firms hiring foreign attys how received an LLM from top schools. I don't know what those persons' legal status was, however.

nestle

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: practicing law as a non-U.S. citizen
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2006, 04:06:58 AM »
Marriage is not the best, it's the only bet. Work visa? Forget about it, you'll get dicked around for years on end and there's no guarantee you'll get the residency! Oh BTW, you've to marry a woman, a man won't do in the US!

erox

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 115
  • no more burning man for erox....
    • View Profile
Re: practicing law as a non-U.S. citizen
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2006, 04:35:55 AM »
don't come on a J. you can't waive the foreign residency requirement through marriage. can you get an F visa for law school? you usually get a year-long work visa after that (practical training).

also keep in mind that if you commit marriage fraud for immigration purposes and get caught, you will be PERMANENTLY ineligible for immigration benefits in the future. A lot of people do it, but it's risky.

go talk to an immigration attorney. That is my advice. US immigration law is complicated, and it's a lot harder to get out of a messy situation then to avoid one at the outset.

either that, or just come over and charm some unsuspecting american with your accent. That should be easy enough.....there are certainly plenty of anglophile hipsters to go around.
GULC 1L
JD/MPP (Int'l Policy and Development)

mailorder

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: practicing law as a non-U.S. citizen
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2006, 04:38:52 AM »
don't come on a J. you can't waive the foreign residency requirement through marriage. can you get an F visa for law school? you usually get a year-long work visa after that (practical training).

also keep in mind that if you commit marriage fraud for immigration purposes and get caught, you will be PERMANENTLY ineligible for immigration benefits in the future. A lot of people do it, but it's risky.

go talk to an immigration attorney. That is my advice. US immigration law is complicated, and it's a lot harder to get out of a messy situation then to avoid one at the outset.

either that, or just come over and charm some unsuspecting american with your accent. That should be easy enough.....there are certainly plenty of anglophile hipsters to go around.

I guess it was the other way around .. wasn't it?! :)

SymphonyOfDreams

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 20
    • View Profile
Re: practicing law as a non-U.S. citizen
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2006, 11:32:28 AM »
There's plenty of hot american chicks for you to marry once you get there, so it shouldn't be hard to NOT fake the marriage... just be sure to get divorce after you become a citizen... again... there's plenty of hot american chicks, why settle with one?   ;)

tamron

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: practicing law as a non-U.S. citizen
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2006, 06:14:04 AM »
don't come on a J. you can't waive the foreign residency requirement through marriage. can you get an F visa for law school? you usually get a year-long work visa after that (practical training).

also keep in mind that if you commit marriage fraud for immigration purposes and get caught, you will be PERMANENTLY ineligible for immigration benefits in the future. A lot of people do it, but it's risky.

go talk to an immigration attorney. That is my advice. US immigration law is complicated, and it's a lot harder to get out of a messy situation then to avoid one at the outset.

either that, or just come over and charm some unsuspecting american with your accent. That should be easy enough.....there are certainly plenty of anglophile hipsters to go around.

I guess it was the other way around .. wasn't it?! :)

;)

liebe

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: practicing law as a non-U.S. citizen
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2006, 08:41:00 PM »
I am an Indian male, will finish 6 years on H1 next year and I'll start law school, if accepted, after having already finished 6 years on H1.

Does anyone know if I can convert from H1 [7th year extension] to F1? If yes, then after the F1, can I get a new H1 with new 6 year timeframe? Thanks in advance.