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Author Topic: poor lawyers  (Read 46751 times)

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #210 on: October 17, 2008, 06:28:36 PM »

A common saying is that "money is the root of evil." My people-experience has proven otherwise. Money can't cripple confidence, can't snuff creativity, and can't kill love near as efficiently or quickly as reticence can. If such a money v. reticence race were run, I would place every spare nickel on that "dark horse" and be confident of winning. What's not said destroys more people than money does, I've found.


Hahaha - you're so funny, Savvy! I know what ya mean ;)


many, I guess the question appears to be: what do you do when what's "not said" when being said turns out to destroy way, way more people than money does? ;)


Would would you get if you combined an emotional vagabond, a dyed-in-the-wool non-conformist and a genius? An outspoken employee garbed in the latest fringe fashion... hoot couture they'd call it, who insults the company president on principle and cares not one whit; who keeps the office in stitches with his barbed wit and comedic brilliance; and who could, given the right inspiration and the VP's corner office (and a midi studio), come up with an idea that could place your company on the stock exchange by noon tomorrow. That's the kind of person they're talking about, I guess. He will do things, say things, and wear things others wouldn't, for fear of ridicule or reprisal. His outrageous actions and sensuous being affords others an opportunity to experience uninhibited and unabashed freedom, vicariously.

straub

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #211 on: October 20, 2008, 10:48:03 PM »
I know some of you won't believe me, but I know a lawyer (he went to a 4th tier law school) who donates sperm to keep up with the loans and the like. He is in his early thirties and has finished law school some 5 years ago, yet he is in financial difficulty. For those of you who are curious, here it is a web page with the biggest sperm banks in the country:

http://www.pinelandpress.com/faq/donor.html#sperm

Make sure the sperm bank is licensed by the state it is in! If it is, you know the state is keeping really close tabs on what the bank is doing with all its sperm. If the bank if not licensed by the state, they could be doing very unpleasant (and possibly illegal) things with the sperm deposits.
I was sad because I had no shoes, until I met a man who had no feet. So I said, "Got any shoes you're not using?"

inunction

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #212 on: October 24, 2008, 04:30:50 PM »

If the bank if not licensed by the state, they could be doing very unpleasant (and possibly illegal) things with the sperm deposits.


When I was working as a paralegal for a law firm we'd deal with a lot of RESEARCH CONSENT FORMS
in relation to Sperm Donation for Stem Cell Research. They're presented to the men donating sperm in order to create embryos for human embryonic stem cell research projects. Embryonic stem cells can be found in embryos around the 5th day of development. These stem cells have the unique ability to turn into any kind of specialized human cell, such as liver cells, heart cells, pancreatic cells, or nerve cells. For this reason, embryonic stem cells can be used to study, and possibly one day help treat, diseases or injuries that have caused patients' specialized cells to die or become damaged – diseases and injuries such as Parkinson’s disease, heart disease, diabetes, and spinal cord injury.

The new human embryonic stem cells from embryos are created with the sperm through androgenesis. (Androgenesis is the process by which a sperm cell is stimulated to begin going through the very early stages of human development. Stem cells that arise from andogenesis would be genetically matched to the person who provided the sperm). In such cases, none of the sperm you donate is used to produce a baby or a pregnancy. And no embryos created from your sperm will be allowed to develop for more than a total of 14 days after they have been created through the union of sperm and egg; created through androgenesis. If any of the resulting embryos are frozen, then the time that they are frozen is not counted as part of the 14 day limit. Researchers only use your sperm to create embryos from which they attempt to get stem cells before the 14 day limit. The resulting research embryos are destroyed during the stem cell collection process. Usually, there is no guarantee that embryos will be successfully created from your sperm; and there is no guarantee that researchers will be able to get stem cells from any resulting embryos. Researchers routinely discard as medical waste any sperm or embryos they do not use for this research project. 

It is likely that the collected embryonic stem cells will be stored for many years. Embryonic stem cells have the ability to self-renew indefinitely, and they are likely to be used by researchers at other institutions and for many other research purposes. One possible research use of these stored stem cells might involve changing some of their genes. Another possible research use might be to study some of the stem cells by placing them into laboratory animals. In addition, the stored stem cells might be used in the future for new research related to human stem cell transplantation. These are just 3 common examples of what might happen to the stored stem cells. But there are many other future possible research uses that are simply unknown at this time. You will have no say as to which institutions or researchers may share the stem cells made from the embryos that were created using your sperm. If stem cell transplantation studies are developed in the future, you will have no say as to who may be a transplant recipient of the collected stem cells, except in the case of autologous transplantation after androgenesis.

r o b o

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The sperm that got away
« Reply #213 on: October 24, 2008, 04:40:09 PM »
"Stolen sperm" is the alleged offence in more and more cases: woman gets pregnant without man's knowledge or consent -- they will usually get the sperm off condoms in trash cans, conserve the sperm in the refrigerator, and later take it to a clinic. The man is required to accept the emotional and financial consequences. Man feels tricked, woman feels abandoned. Sperm warfare ensues.

r o b o

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The Sperm That Got Away
« Reply #214 on: October 24, 2008, 04:49:12 PM »
"Stolen sperm" is the alleged offence in more and more cases: woman gets pregnant without man's knowledge or consent -- usually the woman will get the sperm off condoms thrown in trash cans, conserve the sperm in the refrigerator, then take it to a clinic. The man is -- if not bonded to the woman via the child -- at least required to accept the emotional and financial consequences, once the baby is born. Man feels tricked, woman feels abandoned. Sperm warfare ensues.

A more benign example is that of McKiernan who agreed to provide sperm to an unmarried woman (Ferguson) who wished to become a single parent but wanted to use the sperm of someone she knew rather than an anonymous donor. The man agreed not to seek custody or visitation of the child, and the woman agreed not to seek child support. The woman's eggs were then fertilized in vitro with the man's sperm, and resulting embryos are implanted in the woman's womb for gestation. 5 years after giving birth to twins, the woman demands child support payments from the man. The trial court ruled that the contract is unenforceable because parents normally are not permitted to waive child support requirements. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court, fearing that no man in his right mind would ever be sperm donor if that ruling is upheld, reversed and freed the man of monthly support obligations.

r o b o t

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #215 on: October 24, 2008, 04:52:52 PM »
A more benign example is that of McKiernan who agreed to provide sperm to an unmarried woman (Ferguson) who wished to become a single parent but wanted to use the sperm of someone she knew rather than an anonymous donor. The man agreed not to seek custody or visitation of the child, and the woman agreed not to seek child support. The woman's eggs were then fertilized in vitro with the man's sperm, and resulting embryos are implanted in the woman's womb for gestation. 5 years after giving birth to twins, the woman demands child support payments from the man. The trial court ruled that the contract is unenforceable because parents normally are not permitted to waive child support requirements. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court, fearing that no man in his right mind would ever be sperm donor if that ruling is upheld, reversed and freed the man of monthly support obligations.

r o b o t

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #216 on: October 24, 2008, 04:53:43 PM »
A more benign example is that of McKiernan who agreed to provide sperm to an unmarried woman (Ferguson) who wished to become a single parent but wanted to use the sperm of someone she knew rather than an anonymous donor. The man agreed not to seek custody or visitation of the child, and the woman agreed not to seek child support. The woman's eggs were then fertilized in vitro with the man's sperm, and resulting embryos are implanted in the woman's womb for gestation. 5 years after giving birth to twins, the woman demands child support payments from the man. The trial court ruled that the contract is unenforceable because parents normally are not permitted to waive child support requirements. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court, fearing that no man in his right mind would ever be sperm donor if that ruling is upheld, reversed and freed the man of monthly support obligations.

r o b o t

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #217 on: October 24, 2008, 04:56:15 PM »
A more benign example is that of McKiernan who agreed to provide sperm to an unmarried woman (Ferguson) who wished to become a single parent but wanted to use the sperm of someone she knew rather than an anonymous donor. The man agreed not to seek custody or visitation of the child, and the woman agreed not to seek child support. The woman's eggs were then fertilized in vitro with the man's sperm, and resulting embryos are implanted in the woman's womb for gestation. 5 years after giving birth to twins, the woman demands child support payments from the man. The trial court ruled that the contract is unenforceable because parents normally are not permitted to waive child support requirements. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court, fearing that no man in his right mind would ever be sperm donor if that ruling is upheld, reversed and freed the man of monthly support obligations.

r o b o t

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #218 on: October 24, 2008, 04:58:01 PM »
A more benign example is that of McKiernan who agreed to provide sperm to an unmarried woman (Ferguson) who wished to become a single parent but wanted to use the sperm of someone she knew rather than an anonymous donor. The man agreed not to seek custody or visitation of the child, and the woman agreed not to seek child support. The woman's eggs were then fertilized in vitro with the man's sperm, and resulting embryos are implanted in the woman's womb for gestation. 5 years after giving birth to twins, the woman demands child support payments from the man. The trial court ruled that the contract is unenforceable because parents normally are not permitted to waive child support requirements. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court, fearing that no man in his right mind would ever be sperm donor if that ruling is upheld, reversed and freed the man of monthly support obligations.

fill the void

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #219 on: October 24, 2008, 05:03:00 PM »
A more benign example is that of McKiernan who agreed to provide sperm to an unmarried woman (Ferguson) who wished to become a single parent but wanted to use the sperm of someone she knew rather than an anonymous donor. The man agreed not to seek custody or visitation of the child, and the woman agreed not to seek child support. The woman's eggs were then fertilized in vitro with the man's sperm, and resulting embryos are implanted in the woman's womb for gestation. 5 years after giving birth to twins, the woman demands child support payments from the man. The trial court ruled that the contract is unenforceable because parents normally are not permitted to waive child support requirements. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court, fearing that no man in his right mind would ever be sperm donor if that ruling is upheld, reversed and freed the man of monthly support obligations.