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Author Topic: poor lawyers  (Read 46749 times)

coquita

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #180 on: June 20, 2007, 04:23:41 PM »
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Sparkz1920

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #181 on: June 20, 2007, 08:38:21 PM »
my brother in law is a lawyer at a big tax firm that is held to those 2,000 billable hours. I don't know how it works at his firm. All I know is that he gets to the office at 7-8am leaves around 6-7 and works on Saturdays. I know I will only be making 65,000-75,000 starting out as a prosecutor, but at least I won't have to worry constantly about being fired for not getting enough hours.

That salary is fine for me getting out. I dont wanna sell my soul to make over 100K. I dont anticipate having near 100K in debt, so i know my payments wont be over 1,000 a month. I have no kids and dont mind having something meager to drive yet nice, and a nice furnished apartment. Im not tyhe flashy type, so i dont need all that extra stuff if i cnt afford or dont need it

Sparkz1920

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #182 on: June 20, 2007, 08:42:03 PM »
I just thought I'd mention that I know a guy that went to a 4th tier in Boston, is $100,000 in debt from law school, has his own practice, but has to wait tables FT at night just to make ends meat. He has 2 kids he never sees.


Why choose to go to a high price T4 school? If im gonna pay the same price for law school as i would at a T1, either im going to try to go to the T1, or im going to go to a much cheaper T4

coquita

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #183 on: June 21, 2007, 02:43:53 AM »
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Sparkz1920

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #184 on: June 21, 2007, 06:15:35 AM »
my brother in law is a lawyer at a big tax firm that is held to those 2,000 billable hours. I don't know how it works at his firm. All I know is that he gets to the office at 7-8am leaves around 6-7 and works on Saturdays. I know I will only be making 65,000-75,000 starting out as a prosecutor, but at least I won't have to worry constantly about being fired for not getting enough hours.

That salary is fine for me getting out. I dont wanna sell my soul to make over 100K. I dont anticipate having near 100K in debt, so i know my payments wont be over 1,000 a month. I have no kids and dont mind having something meager to drive yet nice, and a nice furnished apartment. Im not tyhe flashy type, so i dont need all that extra stuff if i cnt afford or dont need it

That's exactly how I feel...but I am feeling pressure by my family and my fiance to think about "selling out" for a couple years if I maintain a high GPA. But the only reason I want to be a lawyer is to practice in criminal law or something similar such as nonprofit work.... so they will have to accept that I will be working for the government and not a firm.


Thats what i want to go into also. Criminal Law. So i may not be making so much getting out of law school, although there are ways to make money working in criminal law because of course, there are always going to be criminals

kind law

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #185 on: June 23, 2007, 09:01:59 AM »

[...] I know I will only be making 65,000-75,000 starting out as a prosecutor, [...]


actually it's 40,000-45,000

kaligula

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #186 on: July 13, 2007, 06:11:21 AM »
"I'm kind of stuck," said a 27-year-old lawyer from Ohio State University Michael E. Moritz College of Law who moved to Chicago after she graduated last year. She did not want to reveal her identity out of a concern that doing so would hinder her job search. Currently working for an in-house department at a large insurance company in Chicago, she graduated in the top third of her class, was a member of law review and participated in the school's moot court competition. She has $70,000 in student loan debt and makes about $50,000 annually. She sent out more than 100 résumés and letters before and after she graduated, she said. "I could get in the door; I just couldn't land the job." She said that many of her friends from law school are working on a contract basis for law firms. A lot of people are making $30,000. She is looking for another job and is considering non-lawyer positions. "I'm not going anywhere," she said.

While the challenges of landing that first job as a lawyer may not be any more difficult for law graduates than for graduates in other fields, the attention paid to the top lawyer jobs by the media, the law firms and the schools themselves can build false hopes about job prospects. I absolutely think their expectations are inflated," said James Leipold, executive director of NALP. Part of the problem lies in the interpretation of the numbers, Leipold explained. As of August 2006, the most recent data available from NALP, the median salary for first-year associates at law firms with 501 attorneys or more was $135,000. Since then, many big law firms have raised their starting pay to $160,000. For firms with two to 25 attorneys, the median salary was $67,000, according to NALP's latest information. But job hunters should view those figures with caution, Leipold said. First, the majority of law school graduates obtain jobs at firms with 10 attorneys or fewer. In addition, location makes a big difference in salaries. Most law school graduates across the country who take jobs in private practice can expect to make between $40,000 and $45,000 their first year, Leipold said.

mle

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #187 on: July 13, 2007, 06:46:06 AM »
Wow, scary, kaligula!

fire

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #188 on: July 20, 2007, 03:02:58 AM »

[...] I was a psychology major in college for a time ... this was until I wrote a paper with the hypothesis that Freud was gay ... The paper was not an attack on Freud or gays, it was just making some salient points about motivations ... The instructor in the class made a point of not agreeing with me, but liked the paper and gave me an A ... Well, the paper was passed around the faculty in the Psych dept and I was eventually called into the Dean's office ... he told me that if I "...continued upon this course, I will refuse to allow you to graduate with a degree in this field." At that point I went back to majoring in history...

Freud is such a polarizing subject in the field, but I never thought that a simple paper would lead to a threat to end my academic path ...


LOL ;)

in house

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Re: poor lawyers
« Reply #189 on: July 30, 2007, 04:05:43 PM »

Bye-Bye, Mein Lieber Herr.
Farewell, mein Lieber Herr.
It was a fine affair,
But now it's over.
And though I used to care,
I need the open air.


I guess this is the whorified version of Whitney Houston's I Will Always Love You:

If I should stay,
I would only be in your way.
So I'll go, but I know
I'll think of you ev'ry step of the way.

And I will always love you.
I will always love you.
You, my darling you. Hmm.

Bittersweet memories
that is all I'm taking with me.
So, goodbye. Please, don't cry.
We both know I'm not what you, you need.

And I will always love you.
I will always love you.

(Instrumental solo)

I hope life treats you kind
And I hope you have all you've dreamed of.
And I wish to you, joy and happiness.
But above all this, I wish you love.

And I will always love you.
I will always love you.
I will always love you.
I will always love you.
I will always love you.
I, I will always love you.

You, darling, I love you.
Ooh, I'll always, I'll always love you.