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Author Topic: Law School Prep Books  (Read 5156 times)

IluvNY37

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Re: Law School Prep Books
« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2006, 10:22:59 PM »
Do a search for Google syllabi for, say, Contracts. They will be from various schools. Download a number of them. Then, compare the cases listed in each and you'll get an idea of what the seminal cases are. Go read those cases. Don't worry if things don't make sense. You might stumble through it the first few times but be patient and perhaps look up some key terms and phrases that help you understand what the case is about. It's painstaking but you'll have to do it eventually so you might as well do it now. Preferably, go check out some books from a local law school and read the cases in the casebook, as there are some notes after the cases that can help.

Thanks! This sounds like a good idea.

Leaf2001br

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Re: Law School Prep Books
« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2006, 02:25:57 AM »
I will say this:

I'll agree with the above poster in the sense that it probably would be very useful to learn some basic vocabulary, especially procedural, for when you start reading cases.  Things like summary judgment, writ of certiorari, assignments of error, petitioner, respondent, default judgment, etc.  It will be a lot less confusing when you start reading cases the first week.  If I remember, even keeping appellees and appellants straight took a little while at first.  A little research on the appellate structure of the state and federal court systems would probably be helpful too.
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favor24

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Re: Law School Prep Books
« Reply #12 on: May 22, 2006, 05:14:29 PM »
Do a search for Google syllabi for, say, Contracts. They will be from various schools. Download a number of them. Then, compare the cases listed in each and you'll get an idea of what the seminal cases are. Go read those cases. Don't worry if things don't make sense. You might stumble through it the first few times but be patient and perhaps look up some key terms and phrases that help you understand what the case is about. It's painstaking but you'll have to do it eventually so you might as well do it now. Preferably, go check out some books from a local law school and read the cases in the casebook, as there are some notes after the cases that can help.


I happened to come across this post and thought it was a great idea.  I went on my school's website and found the syllabi for all of the classes.  Thanks
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LostMyMonkeys

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Re: Law School Prep Books
« Reply #13 on: May 22, 2006, 11:53:11 PM »
It really isn't going to help you at all.  Any edge that you think you'll get going in will evaporate very quickly.  Most law students come in knowing nothing at all about anything.  By the time exams roll around, the best students will be the ones that did the most of what their professors asked them to do.  The volume of assigned work and writing class obligations make this all but impossible.  You separate yourself at law school, you absolutely cannot do it beforehand.  I know this is hard to believe for many incoming 1Ls (I was no different) who are naturally driven and ambitious students, but it just doesn't work.    You may give yourself a little confidence, but that's about it.  You'll soon find out that it was a false sense of confidence.  There are no shortcuts and there are no headstarts.  Relax and enjoy this last summer.  You will have time to put your money where your mouth is soon enough and have an opportunity to prove what you are made of.  Your enthusiasm will be an asset, but revving your engine in the garage will get you no closer to the winner's circle.

My advice: Read something that isn't school-related.  You will soon long for the days you were able to do that.  Or maybe better yet, do as many things outside as possible!

I agree. Read The DaVinci Code. Read Angels and Demons. Read ANYTHING ELSE EXCEPT law related stuff. You will do plently of reading E and E's through the semester. Have a last few months reading something else. Trust me. You don't have any idea how valuable that is.
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sdnomal

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Re: Law School Prep Books
« Reply #14 on: May 23, 2006, 09:30:13 AM »
okay so im going to be registering with pmbr...

you have to select which study guides you want and they have a load of options of books and cd's.

what does eveeryone recommend???

sdnomal

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Re: Law School Prep Books
« Reply #15 on: May 23, 2006, 09:48:19 AM »
do you get free study aides when you register with barbri?

lawgirl

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Re: Law School Prep Books
« Reply #16 on: May 23, 2006, 11:14:50 AM »
Yes

dft

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Re: Law School Prep Books
« Reply #17 on: May 23, 2006, 11:29:02 AM »
Some people actually ENJOY reading the E&E's and learning the law though. That's why many of us go to law school.

I agree. Read The DaVinci Code. Read Angels and Demons. Read ANYTHING ELSE EXCEPT law related stuff. You will do plently of reading E and E's through the semester. Have a last few months reading something else. Trust me. You don't have any idea how valuable that is.

4DClaw

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Re: Law School Prep Books
« Reply #18 on: May 23, 2006, 03:21:34 PM »
Also, are there any PT students out there who also work full-time? If I wasn't working full-time this fall, I wouldn't even consider prepping over the summer. But since we have much less free time than full-time students, I'm wondering if there is some value in reading the E&E's in advance.
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Budlaw

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Re: Law School Prep Books
« Reply #19 on: May 23, 2006, 04:38:58 PM »
Also, are there any PT students out there who also work full-time? If I wasn't working full-time this fall, I wouldn't even consider prepping over the summer. But since we have much less free time than full-time students, I'm wondering if there is some value in reading the E&E's in advance.

Read in advance all you want, but be warned that a lot of times what E&E says and what your professor says might be different. Also know that without some class time, you might just confuse yourself more than anything else.

Personally I say you should just relax as much as possible this summer. Next year won't be that fun. (but it won't be as bad as everyone says it is either...but then again I said that when I got out of Marine Corps Boot Camp too...)