Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: New York Law  (Read 5044 times)

T. Durden

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 472
    • View Profile
Re: New York Law
« Reply #50 on: April 03, 2006, 01:23:03 PM »
i didn't include this information as a means to establish the entirety of lover's argument. certainly numerous members of T3s and t4s go on to be successful, productive, and well-respected members of their respective legal communities. to suggest otherwise would be to turn a blind eye to teh realities of the current legal market. however, at least within certain circles (i.e. DC, which is, admittedly, a non-representative sample of of the overall whole) criterion such as school reputation, ranking, and prestige, are seemingly paramount to any other consideration. 

i did not think this was so until i placed my apartment advertisement. this advertisement is made available through a service to all incoming 2L summer associates who will be working in DC over teh summer. i think that it is relatively safe to say that it establishes a somewhat accurate cross section of who can find employment (for a summer associate position) during the summer months in DC - virtually all have been t14, most have been t10, none outside t1.

who knows. maybe my sample is horribly skewed. could be possible - just not probable.

Leaf2001br

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 526
  • My two cents.
    • AOL Instant Messenger - Leaf2001br
    • View Profile
    • Isaac Online
    • Email
Re: New York Law
« Reply #51 on: April 03, 2006, 05:54:04 PM »
If your definition of success is tied to dollar signs, you will never be happy, and thus never successful.  What exactly are you looking to purchase that justifies you as a success?    Success is measured by your own happiness and how well you cultivate relationships with people.  Therefore, I think everyone would agree LoverOfWomen has demonstrated a personality that prescribes failure.

If I had to bet my last dollar, I would say ray7 is destined to be happy and balanced, and LoverOfWomen is on the path to envy and emptiness, relying on outward impressions of wealth to compensate where his personality has created a deficit.  This never has worked and it never will.
"What is Legal?  What is Illegal?  What is 'Barely Legal'?"  - Ali G

lipper

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 352
    • View Profile
Re: New York Law
« Reply #52 on: April 03, 2006, 11:09:35 PM »
just a note about where tier 3 students find summer jobs. As a tier 3 student, I, too, did not find a job in Washington DC. Personally, if I did, i think i would shoot myself. Instead, I "settled" on working in Manhattan.
check the footnotes ya'll

T. Durden

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 472
    • View Profile
Re: New York Law
« Reply #53 on: April 03, 2006, 11:36:00 PM »
i can't get over this - today: 3 NYUS and 2 Stanfords.


LoverOfWomen

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 166
    • View Profile
Re: New York Law
« Reply #54 on: April 04, 2006, 03:21:35 AM »
If your definition of success is tied to dollar signs, you will never be happy, and thus never successful.  What exactly are you looking to purchase that justifies you as a success?    Success is measured by your own happiness and how well you cultivate relationships with people.  Therefore, I think everyone would agree LoverOfWomen has demonstrated a personality that prescribes failure.

If I had to bet my last dollar, I would say ray7 is destined to be happy and balanced, and LoverOfWomen is on the path to envy and emptiness, relying on outward impressions of wealth to compensate where his personality has created a deficit.  This never has worked and it never will.

I don't think deluding yourself about the consequences of mediocrity is the foundation for a "happy and balanced" life.  Nor is pretending you have  a "last dollar" to bet.

Wealth has a direct relation to happiness, because wealth allows you options and opportunities.  Face it--a lot of doors close when you're poor.  A lot of doors close when you're unprestigious.  Now maybe you can play the sour grapes game and pretend that you never wanted those choices in the first place.  But I would much rather have the choice to go lounging at my favorite club or summering in the Hamptons than worrying about consolidating debts or budgeting my finances. 

michelle my belle

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: New York Law
« Reply #55 on: April 04, 2006, 09:32:53 AM »
I have applied to NYLS and I'll go there if they admit me.

JDG

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: New York Law
« Reply #56 on: April 04, 2006, 10:05:55 AM »
Already admitted by NYLS, but I'm leaning towards St. John's, although I've heard not-so-good things about the latter ..

ray7

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 48
    • View Profile
Re: New York Law
« Reply #57 on: April 04, 2006, 10:20:07 AM »
Loverofwomen, get out of this bubble you live in and face reality. I don't know where you grew up or if you had any friends as a child, but most people I know would hardly consider a 24 year old attorney, making 65,000-70,000, poor and unprestigous. You have the nerve to call someone who is attending a tier 3/4 school a failure? The problem here is you are a social misfit who has probably never really even seen someone who has truly "failed" (dropped out of high school, substance abuse). Unambitious losers? I am 21 years old and will be attending law school next year, something I, as well as most people I know, consider to be extremely ambitious. The truth is loverofwomen, you represent a small, small, portion of the population that holds such feelings. Truth be told, people like you need to re-evaluate what is good in life, and consider how lucky we ALL are to be, where we are now.  

LoverOfWomen

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 166
    • View Profile
Re: New York Law
« Reply #58 on: April 04, 2006, 10:42:24 AM »
Loverofwomen, get out of this bubble you live in and face reality. I don't know where you grew up or if you had any friends as a child, but most people I know would hardly consider a 24 year old attorney, making 65,000-70,000, poor and unprestigous. You have the nerve to call someone who is attending a tier 3/4 school a failure? The problem here is you are a social misfit who has probably never really even seen someone who has truly "failed" (dropped out of high school, substance abuse). Unambitious losers? I am 21 years old and will be attending law school next year, something I, as well as most people I know, consider to be extremely ambitious. The truth is loverofwomen, you represent a small, small, portion of the population that holds such feelings. Truth be told, people like you need to re-evaluate what is good in life, and consider how lucky we ALL are to be, where we are now.  

$65K should be spending cash, not your starting salary.  I frankly don't care what the people in your social circle consider prestige; if they are awed by the tallest of the pygmies, that's really not my concern.  Furthermore, whether or not a "small, small, portion of the population" agrees with me or not is irrelevant; perhaps you've heard of the bandwagon fallacy?  Citing more people who share your precious opinion doesn't suddenly transform it into fact.

I'm perfectly content to see things as they are, rather than relying on false comfort to avoid the specter of failure.  It keeps me motivated and probably will make more successful than any of your associates.  Sorry, but life is about the survival of the fittest; the self-deluded (like you) voluntarily excise themselves from the competition and ultimately, that just makes it easier for people like me.  So keep patting yourself on the back, slugger. 

But while you do, try learning to use the comma correctly.  Just a little helpful note from yours truly.

ray7

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 48
    • View Profile
Re: New York Law
« Reply #59 on: April 04, 2006, 10:50:20 AM »
Happiness, prestige, and even amount of spending money I have, is not fact moron. It is in the eye of the beholder. That is what everyone is trying to say. That is ok though, keep on thinking that the status of your school, job, and money you have is all that matters in life. Man, I feel bad for you at this point.