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Author Topic: New York Law  (Read 5182 times)

ray7

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Re: New York Law
« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2006, 05:05:59 PM »
Is the curve cause for concern? Is it responsible for a percentage of the students being academically dismissed?

abclaw

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Re: New York Law
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2006, 06:39:38 PM »
I personally don't know anyone who was academically dismissed.  Yes, the curve is tough. The way it was explained to us is that if you fall below the B to B- range in a class, the curve free falls rapidly, so you could end up with a D even if you perform just a little worse than someone with a B-.  Last year, I think there were only 7 F's given for the whole school all semester.  The school definitely weeds out the lower end of the class, but what school doesn't?  Supportive environment?  Yes and no.  Yes, there are lots of support programs available, but there's no hand-holding going on here.  Your GPA is a hard number that will determine whether you go forward with the rest of your classmates or are relegated to the PLA group -- a stigmatizing distinction that is cause for great 1L anxiety. 

abclaw

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Re: New York Law
« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2006, 06:45:50 PM »
Oh, and I agree about the library, but nobody uses those dusty old books anyway.  They are practically obsolete. 

ray7

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Re: New York Law
« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2006, 09:00:01 AM »
There are plenty of schools that do not attempt to weed out ANY part of the class. NY Law happens to have a pretty high attrition rate.

gettinwarmer

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Re: New York Law
« Reply #14 on: March 27, 2006, 11:14:10 PM »
Sorry bud, but NYLS sucks absof**ckinglutely ass! Only a crazy would go to NYLS that charges $40K a year and has a bar passage rate of 61% ... you might just as well go to CUNY!

ray7

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Re: New York Law
« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2006, 06:49:24 PM »
Why are you hating on NYLS so much. They have a pretty good employment rate at 9 months after graduation and an average starting salary of about $80,000. Are these numbers fabricated? To be quite honest, I am considering NYLS but am somewhat skeptical due to the high lelvels of criticism towards NYLS on this board.

gcoswaltiii

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Re: New York Law
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2006, 07:07:34 PM »
I am looking at NY for an LLM in tax... Do any NYL students have any information about that or any interaction with LLM students???  I am unable to give any advice on the JD program but if you are having doubts and you are spending all this money to go then you need to be sure about it.  The truth is that LS is no fun anywhere but you need to be in the environment that you think will provide you with the most success for all of your hard work.  Good Luck...

LoverOfWomen

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Re: New York Law
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2006, 07:55:36 PM »
My law school is fun.

[image removed]

ray7

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Re: New York Law
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2006, 07:28:22 PM »
Nice picture but time to be serious again lol. Take a look at Martindale.com. NYLS grads seem to be well represented.

LoverOfWomen

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Re: New York Law
« Reply #19 on: March 30, 2006, 07:41:00 PM »
Nice picture but time to be serious again lol. Take a look at Martindale.com. NYLS grads seem to be well represented.

Yes, back to serious. ;)

Sure you can find NYLS grads on Martindale, but take a look at their bar passage numbers--64.3%, which is below the average for New York.  That means you have a good third of the class that's not even eligible to practice law (at least not in New York).  Then consider that average salary is mostly self-reported.  With these two factors in mind, you get a much less rosy picture.  Of course, like any third tier student, if you claw your way into the top 10% of the class, you definitely will have prospects.  But that's a big if.