Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: UDC  (Read 6260 times)

mecarr

  • Guest
Re: UDC
« Reply #30 on: March 10, 2006, 12:09:37 AM »

You won't ever run into us in practice bro.... Many of us will be in Government, Biglaw, or major Public Interest Groups.  You will be lucky to pass the bar and even if you do, you likely won't ever practice as a lawyer if you go to UDC. 

Dude, things like that make you sound more snobby and elitist than you probably are. To make such a statement like someone who graduates from UDC will never practice as a lawyer is ridiculous. Just because you graduate from a top-25 law school does not mean that you will be a super successful lawyer for the rest of your life. And just because you graduate from a tier 4 school does not mean that you won't ever be a practicing lawyer.

As for being lucky to pass the bar...You guys are acting like 15% of people at UDC pass the bar and passing it is just "luck". I checked and the latest figure shows 65% of UDC graduates passing the bar on the first try and it has only been going up every year. So you guys need to step off your pedestal or you eventually be taken down in the courtroom by someone else..

CDunker

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: UDC
« Reply #31 on: March 10, 2006, 12:23:53 AM »
The OP came here looking to hear good things about the school.  Unfortunately, there isn't very much good to say about it.  LSAC puts the bar passage rate at 35%.  http://officialguide.lsac.org/OFFGUIDE/pdf/aba5245.pdf  I don't see any stats quoting a higher rate.  I never said that it would be impossible for the OP to pass the bar, just that the odds are stacked against him. 

The OP expected us to pat him on the back and say that it's a great school.  It's not.  I'm sure, though, that he'll hear a lot of great things about it when he visits.

Erapitt

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1298
    • View Profile
Re: UDC
« Reply #32 on: March 10, 2006, 09:27:41 AM »
Exactly....  I am not snobby or elitist in the least bit.  However, after kindly stating the facts about the school and pretty much being snipped at and attacked I get a little fed up.  Don't post looking for information if you are not willing to listen to the facts.

Also, I love when people say how they are going to tear me up in the courtroom lol.  Its so easy to say you are going to do something that will never be proven to happen.  First, I likely won't ever see you in a courtroom, and second, who is to say you won't be horrible and I could be some mastermind in the courts?  Fact is, none of us know at this point.  One thing we DO know is that I will have countless more opportunities to get me in the courtroom, while you will be lucky to get your foot in the door.

Go to a site like myspace.com.  Do a search for cooley law alum.  Many of them are now working as legal ASSISTANTS because they can't get a job practicing law as lawyers.  All that debt for nothing.  Many don't even have jobs.
Attending GW in Fall '06

Googlebox

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: UDC
« Reply #33 on: January 19, 2011, 10:10:49 AM »
UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA DAVID A. CLARKE SCHOOL OF LAW FEATURED IN THE PRINCETON REVIEW'S "THE BEST 172 LAW SCHOOLS: 2011 EDITION"

Washington, D.C., October 12, 2010 – The University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law (UDC-DCSL) is one of the nation's most outstanding law schools, according to The Princeton Review. The education services company features the school in the new 2011 edition of its book, "The Best 172 Law Schools” (Random House / Princeton Review, on sale date Oct. 12, 2010, $22.99).

UDC-DCSL is one of 67 schools in the book (39% of the 172) that appear on one or more of the book's top-ten ranking lists. It is 2nd on the list for Most Liberal Students, 4th for Most Diverse Faculty, and 10th for Best Environment for Minority Students. Only six law schools had more top ten rankings than UDC-DCSL, whose three listings tied six other law schools. [Note: not all schools profiled in the book appear on its ranking lists – 67 appear on one or more lists, 105 don't appear on any of its lists.]

Princeton Review does not, however, rank excellence in clinic programs, a major focus of UDC-DCSL’s legal education, and for which it was ranked in the top ten in America by US News and World Report earlier in 2010.

In addition to its top-ten rankings, "The Best 172 Law Schools: 2011 Edition" has two-page profiles of the schools with write-ups on their academics, student life and admissions, plus ratings for their academics, selectivity and career placement services. In the profile on UDC-DCSL the Princeton Review editors describe the school as "a great bargain. The two pillars that set UDC apart are its all-consuming commitment to public interest law and its stellar clinical program." They quote from students attending UDC-DCSL who say "You learn skills that you just cannot learn from casebooks. You will have experiences that many first-level associates can only dream of having.” "The professors want to see you succeed and faculty accessibility couldn’t possibly be any better.” "Friendly and cooperative best describes our law school environment and the relationships among students."

In a "Survey Says . . . " sidebar in the profile, The Princeton Review lists topics that UDC-DCSL students it surveyed were in most agreement about. The list includes: "[Liberal students and students love Washington, D.C.]." The Princeton Review's 80-question survey for the book asked students about themselves, their career plans, and their schools’ academics, student body and campus life.

According to the Princeton Review:

The small David A. Clarke School of Law at the University of the District of Columbia is one of a handful of ABA-accredited law schools at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. By all accounts, UDC is "a great bargain.” It’s "dirt cheap” if you are a resident of Washington, D.C. Even if you aren’t, it’s still remarkably affordable since "the school now has a scholarship program that offers free tuition to 20 activists.” Otherwise, the two pillars that set UDC apart are its "all-consuming” "commitment to public interest law” and its stellar clinical program. This school was founded with the mission to train students from groups underrepresented at the bar and it remains "committed to social justice and advocacy through the law.” Students agree that UDC is "a law school with a conscience” and that they will graduate with "a strong sense of public service and how to serve their communities as lawyers.” The clinical program goes hand in hand with this ethos. Under the supervision of a practicing attorney, all students must complete 700 hours of "hands-on work” assisting low-income clients with substantive, real legal issues before they graduate. "Our clinical experience is like none other,” a 3L boasts. Students gush that they learn skills "that you just cannot learn from casebooks” and they tell us that the clinical requirement provides the expertise necessary "to start practicing law immediately.” "You will have experiences that many first-level associates can only dream of having,” a 2L promises.

Princeton Review continues:

The employment situation for UDC graduates is unique, primarily because it stresses public service so much. The administration and a tremendous number of the students who enroll here want to provide access to the legal system to people who don’t have much money. A very solid percentage of graduates obtain judicial clerkships. Graduates also find jobs at small law firms, with the federal government, and with nonprofit organizations of all sizes. Older UDC alumni have gone on to become judges in a host of states. Ultimately, if you want to start out as a public defender, or work for a federal agency or a public interest organization, UDC is an ideal law school.

Princeton Review does not rank the law schools in the book on a single hierarchical list from 1 to 172, or name one law school best overall. Instead, the book has 11 ranking lists of the top 10 law schools in various categories. Ten lists are based on The Princeton Review's surveys of 18,000 students attending the 172 law schools profiled in the book. (Only schools that permitted The Princeton Review to survey their students were eligible for consideration for these lists.) Conducted during the 2009-10, 2008-09, and 2007-08 academic years, the student surveys were primarily completed online. One list, "Toughest to Get Into,” is based solely on institutional data. (All schools in the book were eligible for consideration for this list.) The lists are posted at www.PrincetonReview.com.

According to Robert Franek, Princeton Review Senior VP-Publishing,

"We are pleased to recommend UDC-DCSL to readers of our book and users of our website as one of the best institutions they could attend to earn a law school degree. We chose the 172 schools for this book based on our high opinion of their academic programs and offerings, as well as our review of institutional data we collect from the schools. We also strongly consider the candid opinions of students attending the schools who rate and report on their campus experiences at their schools on our student survey for the book."


Googlebox

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: UDC
« Reply #34 on: January 19, 2011, 10:11:58 AM »
UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA DAVID A. CLARKE SCHOOL OF LAW FEATURED IN THE PRINCETON REVIEW'S "THE BEST 172 LAW SCHOOLS: 2011 EDITION"

Washington, D.C., October 12, 2010 – The University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law (UDC-DCSL) is one of the nation's most outstanding law schools, according to The Princeton Review. The education services company features the school in the new 2011 edition of its book, "The Best 172 Law Schools” (Random House / Princeton Review, on sale date Oct. 12, 2010, $22.99).

UDC-DCSL is one of 67 schools in the book (39% of the 172) that appear on one or more of the book's top-ten ranking lists. It is 2nd on the list for Most Liberal Students, 4th for Most Diverse Faculty, and 10th for Best Environment for Minority Students. Only six law schools had more top ten rankings than UDC-DCSL, whose three listings tied six other law schools. [Note: not all schools profiled in the book appear on its ranking lists – 67 appear on one or more lists, 105 don't appear on any of its lists.]

Princeton Review does not, however, rank excellence in clinic programs, a major focus of UDC-DCSL’s legal education, and for which it was ranked in the top ten in America by US News and World Report earlier in 2010.

In addition to its top-ten rankings, "The Best 172 Law Schools: 2011 Edition" has two-page profiles of the schools with write-ups on their academics, student life and admissions, plus ratings for their academics, selectivity and career placement services. In the profile on UDC-DCSL the Princeton Review editors describe the school as "a great bargain. The two pillars that set UDC apart are its all-consuming commitment to public interest law and its stellar clinical program." They quote from students attending UDC-DCSL who say "You learn skills that you just cannot learn from casebooks. You will have experiences that many first-level associates can only dream of having.” "The professors want to see you succeed and faculty accessibility couldn’t possibly be any better.” "Friendly and cooperative best describes our law school environment and the relationships among students."

In a "Survey Says . . . " sidebar in the profile, The Princeton Review lists topics that UDC-DCSL students it surveyed were in most agreement about. The list includes: "[Liberal students and students love Washington, D.C.]." The Princeton Review's 80-question survey for the book asked students about themselves, their career plans, and their schools’ academics, student body and campus life.

According to the Princeton Review:

The small David A. Clarke School of Law at the University of the District of Columbia is one of a handful of ABA-accredited law schools at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. By all accounts, UDC is "a great bargain.” It’s "dirt cheap” if you are a resident of Washington, D.C. Even if you aren’t, it’s still remarkably affordable since "the school now has a scholarship program that offers free tuition to 20 activists.” Otherwise, the two pillars that set UDC apart are its "all-consuming” "commitment to public interest law” and its stellar clinical program. This school was founded with the mission to train students from groups underrepresented at the bar and it remains "committed to social justice and advocacy through the law.” Students agree that UDC is "a law school with a conscience” and that they will graduate with "a strong sense of public service and how to serve their communities as lawyers.” The clinical program goes hand in hand with this ethos. Under the supervision of a practicing attorney, all students must complete 700 hours of "hands-on work” assisting low-income clients with substantive, real legal issues before they graduate. "Our clinical experience is like none other,” a 3L boasts. Students gush that they learn skills "that you just cannot learn from casebooks” and they tell us that the clinical requirement provides the expertise necessary "to start practicing law immediately.” "You will have experiences that many first-level associates can only dream of having,” a 2L promises.

Princeton Review continues:

The employment situation for UDC graduates is unique, primarily because it stresses public service so much. The administration and a tremendous number of the students who enroll here want to provide access to the legal system to people who don’t have much money. A very solid percentage of graduates obtain judicial clerkships. Graduates also find jobs at small law firms, with the federal government, and with nonprofit organizations of all sizes. Older UDC alumni have gone on to become judges in a host of states. Ultimately, if you want to start out as a public defender, or work for a federal agency or a public interest organization, UDC is an ideal law school.

Princeton Review does not rank the law schools in the book on a single hierarchical list from 1 to 172, or name one law school best overall. Instead, the book has 11 ranking lists of the top 10 law schools in various categories. Ten lists are based on The Princeton Review's surveys of 18,000 students attending the 172 law schools profiled in the book. (Only schools that permitted The Princeton Review to survey their students were eligible for consideration for these lists.) Conducted during the 2009-10, 2008-09, and 2007-08 academic years, the student surveys were primarily completed online. One list, "Toughest to Get Into,” is based solely on institutional data. (All schools in the book were eligible for consideration for this list.) The lists are posted at www.PrincetonReview.com.

According to Robert Franek, Princeton Review Senior VP-Publishing,

"We are pleased to recommend UDC-DCSL to readers of our book and users of our website as one of the best institutions they could attend to earn a law school degree. We chose the 172 schools for this book based on our high opinion of their academic programs and offerings, as well as our review of institutional data we collect from the schools. We also strongly consider the candid opinions of students attending the schools who rate and report on their campus experiences at their schools on our student survey for the book."


haus

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 173
    • View Profile
Re: UDC
« Reply #35 on: January 19, 2011, 11:10:21 AM »
Googlebox,

Did you copy everything related to UDC from the book into your posting?

I am glad to see that UDC seems to have improved the bar passage rate of its students, and has remained a very reasonable price (by law school standards, most of which cost mor money then they should).

The next few years will be interesting for UDC. I hope that budget concerns to not cause large jumps in tuition that have plagued many schools.

Kaiser7935

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 18
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: UDC
« Reply #36 on: March 02, 2011, 11:08:30 AM »
Recently, a solid 92 percent of UDC students passed the Maryland bar exam, about 7 percentage points higher than the state average. Students also bested the DC bar by 9.5 percentage points, though only 11 of them sat for it.  The facts are the facts! UDC is a rising school. You will be graduating with a cool 30k in loans while a GW grad has 120k. I know an Assistant State's Attorney who graduated from UDC Law and supervises a lot of GW grads. The only different is he is not sweating every night trying to figure out how to pay his bills. UDC is a school that teaches you how to be attorney in the courtroom. If you want corporate stuff go elsewhere. If you want to eventually start your own firm and learn real world legal skills go to UDC.

haus

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 173
    • View Profile
Re: UDC
« Reply #37 on: March 02, 2011, 04:39:08 PM »
Recently, a solid 92 percent of UDC students passed the Maryland bar exam, about 7 percentage points higher than the state average. Students also bested the DC bar by 9.5 percentage points, though only 11 of them sat for it.  The facts are the facts! UDC is a rising school. You will be graduating with a cool 30k in loans while a GW grad has 120k. I know an Assistant State's Attorney who graduated from UDC Law and supervises a lot of GW grads. The only different is he is not sweating every night trying to figure out how to pay his bills. UDC is a school that teaches you how to be attorney in the courtroom. If you want corporate stuff go elsewhere. If you want to eventually start your own firm and learn real world legal skills go to UDC.

Kaiser,

To be fair to get out under 30k one needs to be a DC resident, which not many people are. Although the "Out of City" tuition of just under $18k/year is less than the in-state tuition at George Mason (which is a little over $22k/year last I checked).

As I said before there are indeed things that are looking up for UDC, it is one of the lowest cost options that I am aware of (especially in the region). I do still have worries about what the city budget is going to do to UDC, it would be a shame if funds were slashed or tuition were to be jacked up considerably to offset other finical problems that the city has.