Law School Discussion

The Da Vinci crock

The Circle
« Reply #200 on: June 29, 2009, 10:48:57 AM »

The ultimate desire of mankind is to identify wholeness, to grasp the essence of being, to be integrated with the harmony, perfection, patterns, and cycles of the material, metaphorical and metaphysical worlds. This desire motivates us to explore the realms of fact and fancy, logic and metaphor, reason and emotion, to capture the whole of being in one part, to see it, hear it, feel it, and enjoy it in everyday life. The circle is an object of nature, an idealization of pure mathematics, and a symbol or framework we use to understand and describe our world. The circle exists independently of human thought, as ripples in a pond, or the appearance of the sun and moon, or the shape of the iris of an eye. In mathematics, we choose to define a circle as the places at a constant distance from a center, usually in two dimensions.

The Yin-Yang symbol of two parts spiraling within a circle is a traditional icon of Confucianism and Taoism. It suggests movement around the inside of the circle. It also provides a paradigm of polarity with which to view the dynamics of everyday life. As a symbol, it can be as personal and internal as a heart, which gives and receives blood through each complete cycle. It can also be as general and external as the cycles of day and night.


The yin-yang symbol of Confucianism and Taoism

The Buddhist circular mandala designs have been used continuously for millennia. "A mandala (Sanskrit for "circle") is a symbolic diagram of the universe, arranged in circles, used in tantric Buddhism. The Swiss psychologist Carl Jung considered the mandala to be a universally occurring pattern associated with the mythological representation of the self.


The Mahakala Gonpo-Magpo chakra mandala, by A. T. Mann

Zoroastrianism, the tradition of ancient Persia, is believed by scholars to have been influential in the later development of metaphysical concepts in Abrahamic and Eastern religious beliefs. Its influence survives to our own day, not only in central Asia, but in such products of the European post-Romantic movement as Richard Strauss's music and Friedrich Nietzsche's book, "Thus Spoke Zarathustra." Modern historians have dated the time of Zoroaster to approximately 1750 BC. Also known as Zarathustra, he was the founder of the Zoroastrian tradition. One symbol of Zoroastrianism is the Fra-vahar, a figure that stands for the ideal moral and spiritual focus in life. Fra is the direction, forward, and vahar describes a pulling force. Of the two circles in the figure, the ring in the hand is a reminder that we are bound to keep our promises or agreements with others. The other circle, at the waist, reminds us that our spirits live on, in essence immortal, and so also symbolizes infinity.


The Fra-vahar symbol of Zoroastrianism


The mystical theologian Cardinal Nicholas of Cusa regarded mathematics as the best symbol for things divine. He says in De Docta Ignorantia:

Quote
Since there is no other approach to a knowledge of things divine than that of symbols, we cannot do better than use mathematical signs on account of their indestructible certitude

For example, Cusa used geometry to illustrate the identity of the circle and the line. As a circle becomes very large, it appears less curved, much like how the surface of the Earth appears flat to us because it is so large. In the limit where the circle becomes infinite, then the curvature vanishes and the circle coincides with the straight line.



Cusa's correspondence between the circle and the line, however, has two disadvantages. First, it does not include the point at infinity. Second, it requires passing through an infinite process to form the correspondence. Our approach will therefore differ from Cusa's, even though it follows his basic insight that the apparent opposites of the line circle can be identified. As we will see below, there is another mathematical correspondence between the circle and the line which includes the point at infinity and requires no infinite process. The correspondence is essentially a transformation of our point of view so that the line is seen as a circle. This shift in perspective reveals that the line discontinuously separated from the point at infinity is equivalent to a single continuous circle.

We begin by drawing a vertical z-axis through the line to form a Cartesian coordinate system with the origin of the x-axis at (0,0) and the point at infinity at (0,−1). Now draw a circle of radius 1 with its center at the origin. Note that the point at infinity corresponds to the bottom point on the circle. In addition, the points (−1,0) and (1,0) on the line correspond to points on the circle. There is thus a self-evident correspondence between three points on the circle and three points of the linear mandala. Moreover, there is a one-to-one correspondence between all the other points on the line and all the other points on the circle.



To see this correspondence, imagine a line rotating around the pivot point (0,-1) or, if you prefer, an infinite number of lines radiating outward from (0,-1), the point at infinity. Each of these lines intersects the x-axis at a single point and also intersects the circle at a single point. In other words, each line creates a one-to-one correspondence between a point on the line and a point on the circle. This means that the circle is equivalent to the line.



Notice that there is one line that does not actually intersect the x-axis: the horizontal line parallel to the x-axis. This line does, however, intersect the point p at infinity, which is also a unique point on the circle. This line, therefore, matches these two points. Thus, the line plus the point at infinity is equivalent to the entire circle: every point on this circular mandala is matched with one unique point in the linear mandala. Moreover, this correspondence is continuous, meaning that it matches nearby points on the line with nearby points on the circle. In technical terms, this continuous equivalence of the line to the circle is expressed more precisely by saying that the extended real line is homeomorphic to the circle, i.e., they are topologically isomorphic. The essential fact to understand is that the line plus the point at infinity is completely equivalent to the circle, so we are perfectly justified in viewing it as really being a circle.

Re: Levels of anima development
« Reply #201 on: September 30, 2010, 12:15:41 PM »

Jung has been called weird by many because of his interest in the occult. Freud, for instance, would write to Jung in response to his letter:

Jung: "My evenings are taken up very largely with astrology. I make horoscopic calculations in order to find a clue to the core of psychological truth. Some remarkable things have turned up which will certainly appear incredible to you... I dare say that we shall one day discover in astrology a good deal of knowledge that has been intuitively projected into the heavens. For instance, it appears that the signs of the zodiac are character pictures, in other words libido symbols which depict the typical qualities of the libido at a given moment."

Freud: "In matters of occultism I have grown humble since the great lesson Ferenczi's experiences gave me. I promise to believe anything that can be made to look reasonable. I shall do so gladly, that you know. But my hubris has been shattered." 

Yet, early on Freud himself dabbled in the Kabbala, the esoteric branch of Jewish mysticism. He belonged to a Jewish society called B'nai B'rith and enjoyed weekly games of taroc, a complicated and popular card game which some people think is based on Kabbala. The taroc deck varies in size, but it includes 22 trump cards from the tarot, which are rich in symbolic imagery. The symbolism on these cards may well have set Freud on the path towards his first ideas about the unconscious: it was at this time that he presented his first ideas about dream interpretation. This information has been largely suppresed, probably because it wasn't approved of in Freud's contemporary society, with its rising tide of fierce anti-semitism. Later Freud strongly disapproved in public of what he called 'the occult.'

By the way, in academic circles Freud was often seen as opinionated and rather peculiar so that much of his work was done in what he called 'splendid isolation,' just as it had been from boyhood. He obviously had outstanding intellect, but by his own admission, he had a rather neurotic, obsessive personality and could not imagine a life without work  He wrote incessantly and much of his writing was done on his days off, or even after a busy day seeing his patients. Freud's obsessive personality meant that he was the kind of person who has to do everything meticulously and accurately and he liked to be in control. This can be seen in various ways outside of his work. He was very superstitious about certain numbers -- for instance, he became utterly convinced that he would die at 61 or 62, because of a series of rather tenous coincidencies to do with odd things like hotel room numbers. This kind of thinking is the down side of the type of self-controlled personality that is obsessional enough to produce the astonishing volume of work that Freud did. In extreme cases it can lead to what is known as an obsessional neurosis, where the sufferer is driven by endless compulsive rituals, and becomes unable to function normally.

Freud was a great collector of antiques, fired by his earlier classical studies and his interest in ancient history. He accumulated vast numbers of antique statuettes and other artefacts that are still in display in his study at 20 Maresfield Gardens, Hampstead, London, which is now part of a Freud museum. They are crammed in all over the place, showing that he was not particularly interested in their artistic value, but more in the feeling of connection with the past that they gave him and the sheer pleasure of collecting them. His compulsive streak shows up again in the fact that he smoked cigars heavily nearly all his life and found it impossible to stop, even when he was diagnosed with oral cancer in 1923 and realized that tabacco was doing him no good. It was not until he had a heart attack in 1930 that he finally gave up.


Interesting three lotteries, they say Freud and Jung never saw eye to eye about many issues

Re: Levels of anima development
« Reply #202 on: October 03, 2010, 12:22:35 PM »

Interesting three lotteries, they say Freud and Jung never saw eye to eye about many issues


Very Truly, Freud and Jung calling names to each other is a little bit like the pot calling the kettle black!

louiebstef

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Re: The Da Vinci crock
« Reply #203 on: October 11, 2010, 06:31:50 AM »
This thread is simply "out there."

Re: The Da Vinci crock
« Reply #204 on: October 31, 2010, 12:23:56 PM »

This thread is simply "out there."


I couldn't agree more, louiebstef! I am sick and tired of this "worm" that's been around for years by now - and I want to say this to him: take a piece of paper and write down what is it that you really think, what you really want to do (in spite of the fact that you are not in actuality capable of doing much of it). Apply to it all your ethics, every kind of ethics you can apply to it, and then come back here to tell us whether you still have something valuable and interesting to share. Or else shut the hell up!

With all this cutting and pasting you cannot but demonstrate one thing: that you hiding from yourself, refusing to see yourself in the eye for fear of either too much or too little being there!

As for us, you are history - but of the kind that's too vulgar to repeat itself! You came, you lost, you disappeared! We feared you, fought you and survived you! You are now more than welcome to transcend your ever-changing values when trying to parasitize another human realm, hoping, of course, that your infecting powers are up to par to your mission!

Good Luck and always remember us as your unwilling buddies in a journey that lasted all too long!

Very Truly Yours,
The Orderly Society
(Signed and Sealed)

Re: Moses and The Tablets
« Reply #205 on: April 19, 2011, 02:59:06 PM »
Dear Pericles,


Moses and the Tablets, Rembrandt

By all accounts, the revelation at Sinai was one of the great moments in religious history, sufficiently powerful to have transformed a complaining and bedraggled mixture of slaves and rabble into a God-enthused nation dedicated to the ideal of perfecting the world in the kingship of the Divine. The one tangible result of that one-time-epiphany came in the form of two tablets recording the Ten Commandments. After 40 days and 40 nights on the mountain with God, Moses descended from Sinai, carrying "tablets inscribed on both their surfaces ... The tablets were God's work, and the writing was God's writing." However, the Israelites sank to the depravity of worshipping a golden calf when Moses, their leader, did not return when expected. Moses became enraged by the Israelites' idolatry, and he smashed the tablets, written by the finger of God, to smithereens. At the same time, the great prophet-leader of his people beseeched God to forgive the errant tribes, and caused the Almighty to present a second set of tablets replacing the first.

Now Freud contended that while rising and letting the tablets slip, Michelangelo's Moses gained control of his rage; thus, the right hand was retracted in the beard, pulling it along in the wake of his gesture, and clamping down on the slipping tablets along with the tension of his inner right arm. Freud believed that Michelangelo's Moses was and always will be a figure in the act of restraining himself from rising in the anger of his own passion.


Sincerely, I just don't get why Freud is making such a big deal about it - did not God provide a second set after Moses smashed the original tablets?

It is in his/her interest, after all, for people to have a copy of them!


Hahaha, fromadistance, you're so fukking funny! ROFLMAO!

Re: The Da Vinci crock
« Reply #206 on: November 18, 2011, 08:30:22 PM »



turn on, Ronaldo is not the "saint" people think he is..


"I don't like to see so many gays," declared Scolari. "If I find out that one of my players is gay, then I quickly get rid of him."


Looks like Scolari is not the "saint" people think he is ..

Re: The Da Vinci crock
« Reply #207 on: December 11, 2011, 01:03:02 AM »



turn on, Ronaldo is not the "saint" people think he is..


"I don't like to see so many gays," declared Scolari. "If I find out that one of my players is gay, then I quickly get rid of him."


Looks like Scolari is not the "saint" people think he is ..


I guess it's okay, Poni - in sports being just a lil' bit gay is allowed and acceptable ...

Re: AIG Execs Should Follow Japanese Model -- Suicide or Apology
« Reply #208 on: December 12, 2011, 05:10:41 PM »

Don't get me started with AIG! So disgusting are the actions of AIG's execs that this GOP Senator called for them to do sumthin!

GOP Senator: AIG Execs Should Follow Japanese Model -- Suicide or Apology

March 16, 2009 7:55 PM

In an interview with Cedar Rapids, Iowa, radio station WMT-AM today, Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, said executives of AIG should consider following what he described of the Japanese model of shamed corporate executives: apology or suicide. "I don't know whether the ($165 million in bonuses) is an issue as much as just the chutzpah of the people running AIG," Grassley said. "That they could thumb their nose at the taxpayers, it's more that. The attitude of these corporate executives and bank executives, and most of them are in New York, that somehow they're not responsible for their company going into the tank," he said."I suggest, you know, obviously maybe they ought to be removed, but I would suggest that the first thing that would make me feel a little bit better towards them [is] if they would follow the Japanese example and come before the American people and take that deep bow and say I'm sorry and then either do one of two things: resign or go commit suicide." Grassley added, "In the case of the Japanese, they usually commit suicide before they make any apology."

In a Tuesday morning conference call, Grassley told reporters, according to the AP, that "what I'm expressing here obviously is not that I want people to commit suicide. That's not my notion. But I do feel very strongly that we have not had statements of apology, statements of remorse, statements of contrition on the part of CEOs of manufacturing companies or banks or financial services or insurance companies that are asking for bailouts." Last October, Grassley invoked the Japanese model a little less harshly. "I've suggested it wouldn't be a bad thing that the leadership of these institutions would take a Japanese-style approach to corporate governance," he said then. "And I'm not talking about going out and committing suicide as some Japanese do in these circumstances, but I am talking about scenes I've seen on television where in belly-up corporations the CEOs go before the board of directors, before the public, before the stockholders and bow deeply and apologize for their mismanagement. Something like that happening among Wall Street executives would go a long way toward satisfying my constituents and many Americans that help might be needed and would more gracefully be given by the taxpayers of this county." And responding to the news that Wall Street bankers gave themselves $18.4 billion worth of bonuses in 2008, Grassley told the New York Times' Maureen Dowd at the end of January that the executives "ought to give 'em back or we should go get 'em. If this were Japan and a corporate executive did what is being done on Wall Street, they'd either go out and commit suicide or go before the board of directors and the country and take a very deep bow and apologize."

- jpt


These people might have committed suicide had they lost all their money personally, but - unfortunately - for no other reason. I mean, that's the American way, isn't it?!

Re: The Circle
« Reply #209 on: December 14, 2011, 03:17:09 PM »

The mystical theologian Cardinal Nicholas of Cusa regarded mathematics as the best symbol for things divine. He says in De Docta Ignorantia:

Quote
Since there is no other approach to a knowledge of things divine than that of symbols, we cannot do better than use mathematical signs on account of their indestructible certitude

For example, Cusa used geometry to illustrate the identity of the circle and the line. As a circle becomes very large, it appears less curved, much like how the surface of the Earth appears flat to us because it is so large. In the limit where the circle becomes infinite, then the curvature vanishes and the circle coincides with the straight line.



Cusa's correspondence between the circle and the line, however, has two disadvantages. First, it does not include the point at infinity. Second, it requires passing through an infinite process to form the correspondence. Our approach will therefore differ from Cusa's, even though it follows his basic insight that the apparent opposites of the line circle can be identified. As we will see below, there is another mathematical correspondence between the circle and the line which includes the point at infinity and requires no infinite process. The correspondence is essentially a transformation of our point of view so that the line is seen as a circle. This shift in perspective reveals that the line discontinuously separated from the point at infinity is equivalent to a single continuous circle.

We begin by drawing a vertical z-axis through the line to form a Cartesian coordinate system with the origin of the x-axis at (0,0) and the point at infinity at (0,−1). Now draw a circle of radius 1 with its center at the origin. Note that the point at infinity corresponds to the bottom point on the circle. In addition, the points (−1,0) and (1,0) on the line correspond to points on the circle. There is thus a self-evident correspondence between three points on the circle and three points of the linear mandala. Moreover, there is a one-to-one correspondence between all the other points on the line and all the other points on the circle.



To see this correspondence, imagine a line rotating around the pivot point (0,-1) or, if you prefer, an infinite number of lines radiating outward from (0,-1), the point at infinity. Each of these lines intersects the x-axis at a single point and also intersects the circle at a single point. In other words, each line creates a one-to-one correspondence between a point on the line and a point on the circle. This means that the circle is equivalent to the line.



Notice that there is one line that does not actually intersect the x-axis: the horizontal line parallel to the x-axis. This line does, however, intersect the point p at infinity, which is also a unique point on the circle. This line, therefore, matches these two points. Thus, the line plus the point at infinity is equivalent to the entire circle: every point on this circular mandala is matched with one unique point in the linear mandala. Moreover, this correspondence is continuous, meaning that it matches nearby points on the line with nearby points on the circle. In technical terms, this continuous equivalence of the line to the circle is expressed more precisely by saying that the extended real line is homeomorphic to the circle, i.e., they are topologically isomorphic. The essential fact to understand is that the line plus the point at infinity is completely equivalent to the circle, so we are perfectly justified in viewing it as really being a circle.


WTF man, do you actually have the time to post all this * & ^ %?! Can't believe it!