Law School Discussion

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« on: February 12, 2006, 12:07:23 PM »
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duckasourus

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Re: non-A.B.A. law schools...
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2006, 12:42:03 PM »
A good job NO, you aren't likely to get any job much less a good job.  Competition in Cali is very tough and with soo many ABA schools in California there is no need for firms to hire people from non ABA firms.

jacy85

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Re: non-A.B.A. law schools...
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2006, 01:47:12 PM »
As far as I know, you're allowed to take the bar, but you have to pass the Baby Bar first I think.  Someone posted here a while back saying they passed, barely.  The CA bar exam is ridiculously difficult, or so everyone says, and the consensus seems to be that the Baby Bar is as hard, if not harder, than the regular bar exam.

Brisco

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Re: non-A.B.A. law schools...
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2006, 01:51:19 PM »
the calbar.org website lists passage rates for schools. non-aba students very rarely pass the bar exam

on the plus side, the mayor of LA attended a non-aba law school (though he was unable to pass the bar even after several tries)

eray01

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Re: non-A.B.A. law schools...
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2006, 04:19:09 PM »
This topic has been discussed all over this board, and the consensus is pretty much always the same. You'd be making a big mistake. If saving a little money is you're purpose in going to one of those schools, then I should give you some advice my grand father has given me. Don't be penny wise and pound foolish. Many of those schools aren't approved because they don't meet ABA standards. That should tell you something.
And a note on the baby bar. You'll have to take a mini bar exam to pass on to the subsequent year of school (at least first to second, and possibly second to third too). That sounds like a complete pain in the ass to me.

Can anyone offer good reasons why people would choose to go to one of these schools, other than they can't get in to an ABA approved school (which these days is the plight of one out of two applicants).

voice of reason

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Re: non-A.B.A. law schools...
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2006, 08:23:06 PM »
If a person is not capable of or for other reasons cannot attend an ABA approved law school, it's time to consider anther career.  The study of law is not for everyone.  The legal market is saturated as it is, and many students attending ABA approved law schools have difficulty landing any job, let alone one that they want.  Even if you "have a job lined up" before you even enter law school, attending a non-ABA school is a bad idea.  For one, your area of interest in law will likely change after you enter law school, and the lined up job may no longer be appealing.  Also, the name on your degree will follow you for the rest of your life and will hinder you later in your career.  The law profession can be very elitist, with great emphasis being placed on the school attended. 

The general rule is to get into the best law school you can get into, with a few exceptions .  The better ranked the school, the more opportunities await you fresh out of law school and down the road.  If the best law school you can attend happens to not be accredited, pursue other options.

rezipsa

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Re: non-A.B.A. law schools...
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2006, 03:32:05 PM »
Hey,
   if I'm planning on living / working in California after law school, should I consider a non-A.B.A. approved school? For example, Santa Barbara college of law students are cleared to take the California bar... but do you think it's possible to get a "good" job, coming out of a school like this? Anyone know what you could reasonably expect as a starting salary? Thanks.
SBCL is a good law school.  Several attorneys in the area have graduated from either SBCL or VCL and are doing very well.  There are a few judges in the area that have graduated from SBCL or VCL.

But it all depends on what you want to do after you graduate.  If you are looking to work for a big law firm, then I would suggest that you go to an ABA school.  Big law firms are like the "good ol' boys."  They tend to hire from the schools they went to.  But you never know...Law school is what you make it.