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Author Topic: My Savior Duckasouras  (Read 10862 times)

aloha737pilot

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My Savior Duckasouras
« on: February 05, 2006, 06:37:40 AM »
My guilt and shame have been exposed and now I feel better since "Duckasourus" has posted the truth about distance learning law schools. I have applied to a major online law school hoping that no one would find out because I would be exposed as the uneducated person that I am.  I have decided not to accept the enrollment at the online law school because Duckasourus said it is a worthless degree. I will respect his opinion and give up my job and move to a location where I can attend a full time, ABA approved law school just so my rather eloquent and supremely intelligent friend, Duckasouras, will approve. I suppose I should just give up on my desire to get a law degree. I am so glad you posted your intelligent input on this forum, Duckasouras, you have saved me from the stigma of being a lesser law student than you. I hope you do well in your law studies, and after you get finished with remedial English, remember, Torts is not a dessert.

jacy85

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Re: My Savior Duckasouras
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2006, 11:02:35 AM »
You little rant was actually rather entertaining...

But on a serious note, what exactly do you want to do with your law degree?  Are you getting it for personal or business reasons?  It just doesn't make any sense to spend the time and effort to get a degree from an online law school that you can never use to practice.  If you don't want to practice though, then I guess it could be different.

aloha737pilot

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Re: My Savior Duckasouras
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2006, 04:48:35 PM »
As you can see from my earlier post I am not a traditional law student. My reasons are varied and not at all driven by the desire to practice big money law. What makes you think someone getting their law degree online could not practice anyway? I already have offers of employment from people who know me and what I am capable of. Sure they don't know anyone who has done their law degree online, but neither do I. The key here is that they know me and would welcome me as an attorney when the time comes. I am not leaving my airline job until I reach 60, so if they don't mind hiring me then, maybe I'll think about it.

J D

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Re: My Savior Duckasouras
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2006, 04:56:35 PM »
What makes you think someone getting their law degree online could not practice anyway?

Because in most states, you will not be allowed to sit for the bar exam or be admitted to the bar without a degree from an ABA accredited law school.  California ia a notable exception; if that's where you intend to work as a lawyer, more power to you.  But if you want to work virtually anywhere else in the US, it will be a very tough row to hoe (some states have provisions for reciprocity once you've been admitted to the bar in one state, but it might take a couple years before they'll give that kind of recognition and allow you to practice in their state as well).
"I never think of the future.  It comes soon enough."--Albert Einstein

jacy85

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Re: My Savior Duckasouras
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2006, 06:42:26 PM »
J D answered the question you asked.  You can't practice law if you don't pass the bar.  It follows that if you're not even elegible to sit for the bar, you won't be able to practice law.  Which is why I wondered if you wanted to use it for business or something that isn't "practicing."

Bobo

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Re: My Savior Duckasouras
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2006, 07:43:32 PM »
As you can see from my earlier post I am not a traditional law student. My reasons are varied and not at all driven by the desire to practice big money law. What makes you think someone getting their law degree online could not practice anyway? I already have offers of employment from people who know me and what I am capable of. Sure they don't know anyone who has done their law degree online, but neither do I. The key here is that they know me and would welcome me as an attorney when the time comes. I am not leaving my airline job until I reach 60, so if they don't mind hiring me then, maybe I'll think about it.

Just curious (i.e. not trying to be confrontational), but why would you want to go through the trouble of going to law school (whethere it is ABA approved or not) just because you may or may not practice law when you turn 60?  I assume that the degree will add little value to your current job as a pilot, and there is a chance that you might not pass the bar (assuming you live in one of the handful of states that allow one to sit for the bar with a non-ABA degree).  Plus, you will have to be paying bar fees for all those years that you aren't practicing (the other option would be to take the bar when you are 60, but that could be decades after you graduate since I am assuming you won't be 60 for a while).  I just don't see the sense in it.

aloha737pilot

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Re: My Savior Duckasouras
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2006, 02:08:48 AM »
I think I have a different reason for wanting to study law than traditonal law students. It may also help that the veterans administration is going to pay for the JD I am undertaking. Now check to see what online JD's are approved for veterans benefits, and you have me nailed down. I would not be able to study law otherwise for a number of reasons. I work full time, and the only law school in our state does not have a part time program. I am with a company that has just gone through chapter 11 and is now emerging as a totally changed entity. I want to be in the process instead of on the outside looking in. I simply want to educate myself.

duckasourus

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Re: My Savior Duckasouras
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2006, 05:31:37 PM »
Being a pilot is a very important job. It is one that can not, and should not be preformed by everyone. You take offense to the statement that online law schools are substandard, but wouldn't you be equally alarmed if I purposed to get my commercial pilots license on the internet. Just as it is important that a pilot be properly trained, the same is true with an attorney.
 
When people step on to your plane they put their lives in your hands, and in a less dramatic sense when clients step into my office they do the same.  Being an attorney means standing in place of a person that is effectively helpless in the legal system and making sure their rights are fairly adjudicated. The ABA does the best it can to make sure that they produce attorneys that are capable of doing just that.
 
Don't be mistaken, there is an immense amount of stigma that is attached to getting your degree from a school that is not approved by the ABA. A score of 170 on the LSAT is impressive, but once you have your degree no one cares about your LSAT.

If my Dr went to Harvard medical school and online law school, I would go to him for surgery but not for legal help.

aloha737pilot

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Re: My Savior Duckasouras
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2006, 03:48:23 AM »
The ABA does not produce lawyers, law schools do. The ABA is an organization that has it's own members protection in mind, much like the Airline Pilots Association. There are many non ABA approved law schools in states other than California that are approved by the local state bar. Only half of the lawyers in the US are members of the ABA. Why is that? I can actually attend a non ABA approved law school in Massachusetts and practice law in Connecticut or New York. Online or non ABA approved, I don't need anyone’s else's certification other than the school I attend, the state bar, and myself.

To equate the learning of law with learning to be a pilot online, obviously you know very little of pilot training. Actually most of the book work and testing for pilot training can be accomplished online. The practical skills cannot. I wonder if it is possible to learn legal concepts online and then the practical skills after one graduates. Hmmmm, interesting concept. From what I've heard, most of what you learn in law school is getting you ready for the bar exam, not for the practice of law. Most of the practical skills are learned after law school.

One of the law firms in Los Angeles that I used to have a part time job with a number of years ago, big law firm, has on their staff a number of associates from non ABA law schools. A few of the associates who graduated from ABA approved law schools had a lot of trouble passing the bar. The partners invested in Bar prep tutors to get some of them through on their second try, and even had to do it again for one on his third try. Ever heard of this happening at other law firms? I'll bet it does.

 


brewha

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Re: My Savior Duckasouras
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2006, 06:56:25 PM »
my knocks on an online school: 1) Chances are any reputable firm would toss an application bearing the mark of an online school into the "Not Currently Needed" pile, 2) You don't network with your peers sitting behind a computer, 3) You would miss out on functions such as law review and moot court (and other journals), 4) I'm sure there are more, but BlueBooking has fried my brain...

On the bright side, if you are looking to go start your own practice the first "knock" on online schools is not applicable (However the networking would really help you out when you go on your own).
pudding is delightful