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Author Topic: how would you handle this situation?  (Read 816 times)

law1

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how would you handle this situation?
« on: January 26, 2006, 01:19:07 AM »
Professor does not grade by numbers...grades by names...
-told me to do something specific on a paper..i did it and my grade was dropped bc of it
-told someone i am friends with, after i walked away that "blondes take their clothes off easily"
-known among entire student body for grading based on favoritism


zemog

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Re: how would you handle this situation?
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2006, 03:28:53 AM »
Dye your hair????

But seriously, suck it up and after this semester, don't take any more classes with him.

Jumboshrimps

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Re: how would you handle this situation?
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2006, 08:44:55 AM »
The "blondes" comment must have made your blood boil. I'm no feminist, but I'd take action on that one. Drop a note on the dean.

As to the open grading, that's a litte weird, but I think you have to swallow it.

Telling you to do something and then lowering your grade for it is obviously bulllshit, but law professors are not 3rd grade teachers, and for some reason they're immune to accusations of arbitrary grading.

Bottom line... sounds like you got stuck with a real prick.

jd2b06

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Re: how would you handle this situation?
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2006, 12:59:33 PM »
Wow what a jackass  :o 

I don't know how well the Dean will respond to your complaints.  I doubt they will at all unless there has been more than one reported incident and they have no choice.  Especially if he is well respected by the faculty and in law school circles. 

I can't believe this actually happens ~ I don't know what you can do... I would suggest something but it's tough.  You can try complaning to someone but I really don't know what good it will do you.  Are you close to a female professor by any chance?  If you are they may be the key to helping you make your case.  If not I'd have to agree with the poster that said suck it up...

norm012001

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Re: how would you handle this situation?
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2006, 02:48:28 PM »
The biggest problem is that your friend heard it, not you.  If your friend is willing to come forward, then I think you should say something.  I disagree that the dean will ignore it, it's a big deal because it goes beyond just being a teacher/student relationship.  This is a business too, and there are laws against harassment.

As far as the grading thing, I think you're out of luck, he can always say he told you to do something in general, but then you did it badly and hurt yourself.

Arbitrary grading is a bad road to go down, especially if you did poorly.  Unless someone who did well is willing to say the same thing, you'll come out looking worse.
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lincolnsgrandson

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Re: how would you handle this situation?
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2006, 09:03:36 AM »
Agree with norm - complaints about grading are fruitless pursuits.  The schools is always going to have students complaining to the dean about grading, tests, etc.  Some of these complaints might be valid, but they're going to be lost in the mix.  And, it's generally only people who receive weak grades who complain - it's nearly impossible not to sound like sour grapes.  Your particular complain doesn't sound like the most compelling - I've heard and experienced worse.  I assume it's a legal writing class; there's inevitably a subjective element to the class.  And to tag a grading complaint along with a harrassment complaint taints the credibility of both.

As to the comment - genuine instances or suggestions of sexual harrassment should be pursued.  Undoubtedly, a school is going to bend to the direction of its professor.  Absent any context, could that comment really be determined to be sexual harrassment?