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Author Topic: T4 to T1??  (Read 3307 times)

QUAKER OATS

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T4 to T1??
« on: January 25, 2006, 06:48:40 PM »
I'm at a T4, just got my final grades and ended up w/ a 3.2 on a forced curve of 2.33-2.67.  Any chance of moving up as high as T1? T2?

Thanks in advance for your input.

QUAKER OATS

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Re: T4 to T1??
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2006, 06:52:12 PM »
also, according to last years rankings; a 2.95 was around top 20%.

BigPimpinBU

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Re: T4 to T1??
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2006, 02:14:12 AM »
T1 might be a stretch, but probably a solid T2. Congrats btw.

CoxlessPair

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Re: T4 to T1??
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2006, 10:37:01 AM »
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BigPimpinBU

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Re: T4 to T1??
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2006, 01:15:18 PM »
Come to think of it, we have a bunch of kids who transferred here from New England. Is that T4 or T3? They were top 10% though, from what I understand.

tjking82

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Re: T4 to T1??
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2006, 03:04:28 PM »
T1 might be a stretch, but probably a solid T2. Congrats btw.

This is also what I thought.

Top 1/3 from a T4 seems a little easy to transfer to a T1.  Don't you think this would create more demand for seats than there is supply?  (Especially given that many T1 schools don't take many transfers, and the other tiers are all trying to transfer up as well.)

dft

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Re: T4 to T1??
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2006, 04:32:32 PM »
Come to think of it, we have a bunch of kids who transferred here from New England. Is that T4 or T3? They were top 10% though, from what I understand.

New England is T4, as it Suffolk (which clearly has a better reputation than NE). I'm at Suffolk. I'm applying to transfer to BC and BU in June.

CoxlessPair

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Re: T4 to T1??
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2006, 05:11:49 PM »
I agree on the top 1/3rd being a bit too much for T1s to let in.
Regardless, that is what the admissions reps told me.

Maybe that is simply the auto-reject standard and everyone else who makes that cut fights it out.

The unofficial standard clearly seems top 15% or better, which unconsciously keep many from transferring. I'd imagine others have family, job, or other commitments that keep them from transferring up even if they cut it academically. That lag could allow people in the 16%-30% range to slip in.


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QUAKER OATS

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Re: T4 to T1??
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2006, 07:11:53 PM »
I think few people want to transfer.  Many people are older; have family; like the current school.  Also, T4s are famous for offering scholarships to discourage good students to transfer.

Thanks everyone for the input.  Good luck to all looking to transfer

obviousl

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Re: T4 to T1??
« Reply #9 on: January 30, 2006, 02:32:59 AM »
Succeeding at winning a law school transfer at the end of your first year of law school is frankly quite difficult. Many people, seeing the ease at which people currently transfer from one college to another at the undergraduate level, assume the same thing about the world of law schools. But the law school transfer market is much narrower. American law schools generally do not seek to have high attrition rates during the first year, as was once the case. Now, overwhelmingly, most first-year law students go on to their second and third years at the same law school. Thus, few additional seats open up in the second year.

Secondly, there has been some reluctance on the part of higher-ranked law schools to "cherry pick" the very best students at the end of the first year from lower-tier schools, especially neighboring law schools. Imagine a city with elite national law school "A", respected regional law school "B" and good local law school "C." At the end of each year, the very top students at B and C may well be tempted to seek a transfer upwards to A. Admissions decision makers at A recognize that such students, the victors in the battle of the first year at B and C, are frankly better students than a good number of their own at A. The institution of A would be benefited by the addition of such a handful of top B and C students, but a pattern of regular taking of these top students will strain A's relationships with B and C. Thus, this concern, and the lack of a large number of second-year seats, prevents too much movement upward.

For those second-year transfer seats that are available, competition is fierce, as by then, first-year law students understand much more about the hierarchical nature of the law schools and the legal profession. The good news for those considering a transfer is that undergraduate grades and LSAT scores fade considerably in importance to those schools receiving transfer applications. More good news is that some top law schools, like Georgetown, deliberately create a number of new 2L seats, and they have gotten over much of their historic concern about "cherry picking." The bad news is that top first-year law school grades--somewhere between the top 20% to literally being the top person in the 1L class--are necessary for serious consideration in the transfer application process. You may have to beat just about every other 1L student in your class in order to gain serious consideration in the transfer process.

Given this challenge, here's how I work with transfer applicants. If you are seriously thinking about this, contact me as soon as possible during your first year of law school. Time for the development of strategic elements is essential.