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Author Topic: Resume Questions...and drama...  (Read 2404 times)

MsCatch22

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Resume Questions...and drama...
« on: January 07, 2006, 03:48:22 PM »
So here is the summary of my life so far. 

Finished 1L, Did fairly well, got offers of journals (but not law review), had a summer placement at a non-profit, given a fellowship/scholarship to cover the summer......

Finances disappeared, expenses popped up, returning to law school looked bleak....

So I dropped out and returned to my previous job teaching....

Anyway, I've found the way to finance the return to law school.

Now here are the problems I have

1. I didn't finish my job over the summer so I have no experience.
2. The clinic I was registered for (for the fall semester) I missed out on
3. No longer able to join a journal
4.  Technically this summer will be my "2L" summer

So questions:

1. How do I deal with this on my resume? In the time since I left school, I did work on a specialization for my previous degree and as I mentioned was working as a teacher.

2. Should I try to do something part time legally related to gain some experience this semester??

3. Help!!!

Thanks

giraffe205

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Re: Resume Questions...and drama...
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2006, 10:10:08 PM »
I don't think you should deal w/ it on your resume but rather in the interview. However, if you at least started to work at the non-profit but did not finish, I would put down that you worked there. Perhaps you could also do a judicial externship through your school for credit or a clinic of some sort and put it down as well. These will give you something to talk about. In other words, at the interviews, you'll be able to talk about how you get clients to trust you or how exciting a particular hearing was.

ApproachTheBench

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Re: Resume Questions...and drama...
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2006, 08:56:37 PM »
I agree that this is really the kind of thing that is best to deal with in the interview.  It's a nasty problem and I still think it's worth talking to your career services advisor about.
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Krisace

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Re: Resume Questions...and drama...
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2006, 11:24:13 PM »
I would actually put something in your cover letter, albeit quite brief. Much of the cuts are made from that original pile, not at the interview stage so address the issue and shift the focus to your grades/rank.

rapunzel

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Re: Resume Questions...and drama...
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2006, 11:20:06 PM »
Yeah, I'd save this one for the interview.  Start with beefing up on the experience- the judicial internship was an excellent suggestion.  There are many people who didn't get much experience their 1L summer, so I'd say you don't have to offer excuses up front.  Focus on the positive in your introductory materials. 

I know everyone hates this advice, but outside of OCI, networking is going to yield more results than sending out letters anyway.  It's easier to deal with a percieved flaw in your background in a causal personal conversation.  And then if that person recommends you to someone for advice or an interview, they will have already laid the groundwork for you. 

I didn't get an offer from my summer employer, so I did feel like I had a weakness in my credentials.  But I focused my permanant job search strategies completely on networking.  I only sent resumes when someone recommended I sent them so they could start, "So and so recommended I contact you."  I ultimatley only sent 12-15 resumes.  And I ended up with an awesome job I love. 

The other big thing is you need a spiel. You need a neat and tidy explanation if you feel that this even needs to be discussed.  Plus you need to be able to know that you will talk about it concisely and without nerves when you are in an interview situation.  Get ye to your career counselor so you can get some practice.