Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: What's good about being an attorney?  (Read 46565 times)

lawstudent2011

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 116
    • View Profile
Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #190 on: February 13, 2011, 12:49:38 PM »
Well, the only other respected post graduate fields tend to be medical and CPA.

I hate taxes and if I have to get someone's blood on my hands, I'd prefer it be figureative vs actual.  :P

If someone would prefer to quit and become an MBA let'em. Someone has to make my damn coffee in the morning.

My Bonnie

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #191 on: February 16, 2011, 10:08:21 PM »

Just to be sure I'm getting this right - he used the syringe with no needle to inject Bobby's vagina with the cocaine dissolved in water in such a quantity that it would kill her? But then why did he have to smother her with the pillow, she would die by herself..


There'd be too much noise, she began to convulse pretty bad and it could take some time until she'd expire on her own.


So basically cocaine-induced convulsions are similar to epileptic seizures? Does foam come out of the mouth as the case is in grand mal?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j957yP2E5j8&mode=related&search=


I am not sure about foam out of the mouth, but cocaine seizures can be pretty scary, just like the epileptic ones.

L.B.

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #192 on: November 15, 2011, 08:34:17 PM »

One day a young lawyer and his wife were in their bedroom making love. All of a sudden a bumble bee entered the bedroom window. As the young lady parted her legs the bee entered her vagina. The woman started screaming "Oh my god, help me, there's a bee in my vagina!" The lawyer immediately took her to the local doctor and explained the situation.

The doctor thought for a moment and said "Hmm, tricky situation. But I have a solution to the problem if young sir would permit." The husband being very concerned agreed that the doctor could use whatever method to get the bee out of his wife's vagina. The doctor said "OK, what I'm gonna do is rub some honey over the top of my penis and insert it into your wife's vagina. When I feel the bee getting closer to the tip of my penis I shall withdraw it and the bee should hopefully follow my penis out of your wife's vagina. The husband nodded and gave his approval. The young lady said "Yes, Yes, whatever, just get on with it."

So the doctor, after covering the tip of his penis with honey, inserted it into the young lady's vagina. After a few gentle strokes, the doctor said, "I don't think the bee has noticed the honey yet. Perhaps I should go a bit deeper." So the doctor went deeper and deeper. After a while the doctor began shafting the young lady very hard indeed.

The young lady began to quiver with excitement. She began to moan and groan aloud. The doctor, concentrating very hard, looked like he was enjoying himself, he then put his hands on the young lady's breasts and started making loud noises. The lawyer at this point suddenly became very annoyed and shouted, "Now wait a minute! What the Hell do you think you're doing?" The doctor, still concentrating, replied, "Change of plan. I'm gonna drown the bastard!"


I remember having read this joke and the guy who brought his wife to the doctor was not a lawyer - it's a shame that people are trying to demean lawyers in such a way!
Why do psychics have to ask you for your name?

justanothersucker

  • Guest
Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #193 on: November 15, 2011, 08:43:59 PM »
Yeah, every time I see a construction worker or janitor or auto worker makes fun of lawyers......I just die a little in side........ :'(


One day a young lawyer and his wife were in their bedroom making love. All of a sudden a bumble bee entered the bedroom window. As the young lady parted her legs the bee entered her vagina. The woman started screaming "Oh my god, help me, there's a bee in my vagina!" The lawyer immediately took her to the local doctor and explained the situation.

The doctor thought for a moment and said "Hmm, tricky situation. But I have a solution to the problem if young sir would permit." The husband being very concerned agreed that the doctor could use whatever method to get the bee out of his wife's vagina. The doctor said "OK, what I'm gonna do is rub some honey over the top of my penis and insert it into your wife's vagina. When I feel the bee getting closer to the tip of my penis I shall withdraw it and the bee should hopefully follow my penis out of your wife's vagina. The husband nodded and gave his approval. The young lady said "Yes, Yes, whatever, just get on with it."

So the doctor, after covering the tip of his penis with honey, inserted it into the young lady's vagina. After a few gentle strokes, the doctor said, "I don't think the bee has noticed the honey yet. Perhaps I should go a bit deeper." So the doctor went deeper and deeper. After a while the doctor began shafting the young lady very hard indeed.

The young lady began to quiver with excitement. She began to moan and groan aloud. The doctor, concentrating very hard, looked like he was enjoying himself, he then put his hands on the young lady's breasts and started making loud noises. The lawyer at this point suddenly became very annoyed and shouted, "Now wait a minute! What the Hell do you think you're doing?" The doctor, still concentrating, replied, "Change of plan. I'm gonna drown the bastard!"


I remember having read this joke and the guy who brought his wife to the doctor was not a lawyer - it's a shame that people are trying to demean lawyers in such a way!

appropriate

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 6
    • View Profile
Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #194 on: December 03, 2011, 01:28:44 AM »

[...] Well-meaning efforts by liberal psychologists to reform the law in keeping with values such as dignity, privacy, justice, and equality are often misguided because law exists to serve the status quo. Law inhibits the systemic, radical social change necessary for psychological and societal well-being. It does so through coercive power, substantive assumptions about human nature, the ideology of law's legitimacy, a preoccupation with procedure rather than substance, a focus on rational technicality rather than equity, and encouragement for limited, self-defeating legal solutions. [...] Law, in short, is an an opponent rather than an ally of those seeking fundamental change.

1. Heavy Handed Use of Coercive Power

The first way that law presents social change is obvious: Coercion. As Lawrence Friedman put it, "Law has its hidden persuaders -- its moral basis, its legitimacy -- but in the last analysis it has force, too, to back it up. Law carries a powerful stick: the threat of force. This is the fist inside its velvet glove. Law is used directly and indirectly to hinder both legal and illegal social change efforts. Electoral challenges, for example, are deflected by state legislatures, which devise unreasonable deadlines, excessive petition requirements, and other hassles to keep third parties off the ballot. As an old anarchist slogan put it, "If voting could change the system, it would be illegal." [...] Harassment of activists doesn't come just from government. Corporations often file libel and other lawsuits against people who use letters to newspapers, public statements, and similar methods to criticize corporate projects such as toxic waste dumps. [...] Although most of these suits are legally "unsuccessful" in that free speech rights are upheld and the activist pays no damages, the suits serve their purposes of transforming political debates into private disputes and, more significantly, taking up activist's time and resources, bankrupting him, often causing the abandonment of public advocacy on his part [...]

2. Substantive Assumptions About Human Nature

The second way law opposes social change is through its assumptions about human behavior. [...] The myth of humankind's inherent lawlessness, for instance, ignores the fact that the search for rules and rule dependency appears early in human life and is visible across all activity from games to government and language to law. In essence, no community is truly lawless.

3. The Ideology of Law's Legitimacy

The third way law inhibits social change is through the central myth that the law is "legitimate," that obedience to law is appropriate because legal authorities have the right to make demands. This belief prevents anarchy and induces people to obey orders and commands without the use of force. Legitimacy is necessary for the political system to continue in its current form, since in a very real sense, the 'consent of the governed' depends upon such fictions, including the fiction that law is sacred. [...]
 
4. Preoccupation With Procedure Rather Than Substance

The fourth way law opposes social change is in blunting appeals for substantive justice by focusing instead on procedural justice. Seeing legal procedures are seen as satisfying or fair, with government leaders may find it easier to create conditions of 'perceived fairness' than to solve problems or provide needed benefits. The Supreme Court's "let them eat due process" approach.

5. Focus on Rational Technicality Rather Than Equity

The fifth way law stands against social change is the insistence that the "rule of law" is superior to non-law, that the United States is a "government of law, not of men." Related to the lawlessness and legality myths is the assumption that problems should be resolved through law - seen as objective, rational, and hard-nosed - rather than through non-legal means - seen as subjective, ruthless, and unpredictable. Law is better, it is said, even if the application of general principle to a particular case brings an unfair result, because the only alternative to law is chaos. The opposite of legal technicality, however, is not chaos, but equity. Under equity principles, legal technicalities can be set aside to prevent injustice. [...]

6. The Self-Defeating Character of Legal Solutions

The final way law opposes social change has to do with the self-defeating character of legal solutions, despite their seductive appeal. Reform is seductive because it assumes that law can be transformed so significantly that it will operate at a "higher principled level.' This is doubtful, though, because the reasons for which law exists conflict with principled levels of reasoning and ethics. Law exists to maintain rather than change the status quo, to protect some at the expense of others, to control rather than liberate. [...] The very success of legal solutions makes things worse, because legal solutions reduce people's ability and motivation to work together with others on community solutions to social problems. Legal reforms may work, but only by forcing complex human interactions into an artificial framework, creating dependency on legal authorities. [...] Right and wrong become a specialty of professionals such as lawyers, police, and judges. [...] Law teaches us that we are not capable of being good unless we are forced to be good.


Awesome summary!

entitatitivity

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #195 on: February 14, 2012, 07:33:56 PM »

[...]

Beyond a simple condemnation of authoritarian value systems, Fromm used the story of Adam and Eve as an allegorical explanation for human biological evolution and existential angst, asserting that when Adam and Eve ate from the Tree of Knowledge, they became aware of themselves as being separate from nature while still being part of it. This is why they felt "naked" and "ashamed": they had evolved into human beings, conscious of themselves, their own mortality, and their powerlessness before the forces of nature and society, and no longer united with the universe as they were in their instinctive, pre-human existence as animals. According to Fromm, the awareness of a disunited human existence is a source of guilt and shame, and the solution to this existential dichotomy is found in the development of one's uniquely human powers of love and reason.


They say LSD induces an experience that will make you appreciate exactly what Fromm talks about here - being one with the nature, the Whole.


LSD "opens people up" - Timothy Leary used to say that LSD was the most powerful aphrodisiac ever discovered - compared with sex under LSD, the way you have been making love -- no matter how ecstatic the pleasure you think you get from it is like making love to a department-store-window dummy.

The three inevitable goals of the LSD session are to discover and make love with God, to discover and make love with yourself, and to discover and make love with another person.