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Author Topic: What's good about being an attorney?  (Read 47202 times)

castrot

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #150 on: March 09, 2008, 05:49:16 PM »

jensa, when parents are faced with this disaster of seeing a baby born with clubfeet, they get to be very depressed.When they go to the doctor and are told that their baby must have surgery, they are sad. But when they can see that this deformity is nothing, that is a very easy thing to correct and the child is normal, they have hope. Extensive surgery does not "cure" clubfoot. It improves the appearance of the foot but diminishes the strength of the muscles in the foot and leg and causes stiffness in the second and third decade of life (if not earlier). This limits the motions of the foot joints, and the foot becomes often painful at midlife. Extensive surgery does not prevent the recurrence of the deformity in a number of cases. No followup studies of operated patients older than 16 years of age have been published to date; therefore, orthopaedic surgeons are ignorant of the results of their surgeries.


Amen zan! An acquaintance of mine was unfortunate enough to contact a complete moron surgeon who was not aware of the wiring techniques for the lower cervical spine (Roger's technique, the Bohlman triple wire technique, Dewar technique, Robinson and Southwick facet wiring, and the oblique facet wiring). She was simply told, "Wiring won't work!" The only thing he knew in relation to the subject was the atlantoaxial arthrodesis performed for translational instability due to traumatic ligamentous disruption or fracture, inflammatory arthropathy, congenital abnormalities, etc (dorsal fusion can be accomplished by means of C1-2 wiring, transarticular screw fixation or interlaminar Halifax clamp technique. The Gallie and Brooks techniques have also been used for C1-2 wiring and fusion).


Roger's technique

Well, another orthopaedic surgeon she contacted said dorsal cervical wiring is used in the subaxial cervical spine to stimulate the function of the dorsal ligaments by providing a tension band effect and by fixating bone graft or rods. The most common indication for these procedures is the treatment of distractive flexion injuries resulting in unilateral or bilateral facet disruption and dislocation. Biomechanical studies had suggested that dorsal fixation and fusion techniques were superior to ventral cervical plating. Most wiring techniques have evolved from the technique reported by Rogers. Roger's technique is a simple interspinous process wiring technique wherein the wire is passed around and through the bases of adjacent spinous processes with corticocancellous bone grafts laid under the wires bridging the interspace.


scander

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #151 on: March 11, 2008, 06:36:35 PM »
Don't get me started with surgeons! My brother-in-law visiting his parents here was trying to break a fall by putting his hand out in front of him -- the force of the fall traveled up his lower forearm bones and dislocated his elbow (it also broke his smaller bone in the forearm (radius) near the elbow at the radial "head"). Radial head fractures are common injuries, occurring in about 20% of all acute elbow injuries, with approximately 10% of all elbow dislocations involving a fracture of the radial head as well. As the humerus and ulna return to their normal alignment, a piece of the radial head bone could be chipped off (fractured). Now the problem with radius head fractures in case of improper treatment is, especially in children, that you have extreme difficulty in turning the forearm palm up to palm down or vice versa - pronation/supination. The stupid m u t h a @ # ! * i n g orthopedist removed his entire radial head, supposedly because it could not be fixed with pins/screws as it was broken in multiple pieces, when the radiologist had told him just minutes before that it was a Type II Fracture of the Radial Head (slightly displaced, involving a larger piece of bone).

When confronted by him this "doctor" said they do not remove the radial head no matter what only in children. Well, that was bull, since they are  in children -- fractures of radial head occur in adults, whereas in children it is the radial neck fractures that happen frequently. The radial neck is the area close to where one tendon of the biceps brachii muscle is inserted (on the posterior portion of the radial tuberosity).


satangrader

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Re: The Secret Cube
« Reply #152 on: March 13, 2008, 07:33:17 PM »

Dundee

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #153 on: March 18, 2008, 12:35:55 PM »
Awesome I'd say!

vignette

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #154 on: March 31, 2008, 06:21:49 PM »

- Visionary

Contrary to popular opinion, serial killers are rarely insane or motivated by hallucinations and/or voices in their heads. Many claim to be, usually as a way of trying to get acquitted by reason of insanity. There are, however, a few genuine cases of serial killers who were compelled by such delusions. Herbert Mullin slaughtered 13 people after voices told him that murder was necessary to prevent California from suffering an earthquake. (Mullin went to great pains to point out that California did indeed avoid an earthquake during his murder spree.) Ed Gein claimed that by eating the corpses of women who looked like his deceased mother, he could preserve his mother's soul inside his body. He killed two women who bore passing resemblances to his mother, eating one and being apprehended while in the process of preparing the second woman's body for consumption. He also used the flesh of exhumed corpses to fashion a "woman suit" for himself so that he could "become" his mother, and carried on conversations with himself in a falsetto voice. After his arrest he was placed in a mental facility for the remainder of his life.

- Missionary

So-called missionary killers believe that their acts are justified on the basis that they are getting rid of a certain type of person (often prostitutes or members of a certain ethnic group), and thus doing society a favor. Gary Ridgway and Aileen Wuornos are often described as missionary killers. In Wuornos' case, the victims were not prostitutes, but their patrons. Missionary killers differ from other types of serial killer in that their motive is generally non-sexual. Arguably, Jack the Ripper also fits this role.

- Hedonistic

This type kills for the sheer pleasure of it, although what aspect they enjoy varies. Yang Xinhai's post capture statement is typical of such killers' attitudes: "When I killed people I had a desire [to kill more]. This inspired me to kill more. I don't care whether they deserve to live or not. It is none of my concern." Some killers may enjoy the actual "chase" of hunting down a victim more than anything, while others may be primarily motivated by the act of torturing and abusing the victim while they are alive. Yet others, like Jeffrey Dahmer, may kill the victim quickly, almost as if it were a chore, and then indulge in necrophilia or cannibalism with the body. Usually there is a strong sexual aspect to the crimes, even if it may not be immediately obvious, but some killers obtain a surge of excitement that is not necessarily sexual, such as Berkowitz, who got a thrill out of shooting young couples in cars at random and then running away without ever physically touching the victims.

- Gain motivated

Most criminals who commit multiple murders for material ends (such as mob hit men) are not classed as serial killers, because they are motivated by economic gain rather than psychopathological compulsion. There is a fine line separating such killers, however. For example, Marcel Petiot, who operated in Nazi-occupied France, could be classified as a serial killer. He posed as a member of the French Resistance and lured wealthy Jewish people to his home, claiming he could smuggle them out of the country. Instead he murdered them and stole their belongings, killing 63 people before he was finally caught. Although Petiot's primary motivation was materialistic, few would deny that a man willing to slaughter so many people simply to acquire a few dozen suitcases of clothes and jewelry was a compulsive killer and psychopath. However, it is impossible to understand the true motivation in such cases.

- Power/control

This is the most common serial killer. Their main objective for killing is to gain and exert power over their victim. Such killers are sometimes abused as children, which means they feel incredibly powerless and inadequate, and often they indulge in rituals that are linked, often very specifically, to forms of abuse they suffered themselves. One killer, for example, forced young girls to perform oral sex on him, after which he would spank the girl before finally strangling her. After capture, the killer claimed that when he was a child his older sister would force him to perform oral sex on her, then she would spank him in order to terrify him into not telling their parents. The ritual he performed with his victims would negate the humiliation he felt from his abuse as a child, although such relief would only be temporary, and like other such killers, he would soon feel compelled to repeat his actions until eventual capture. (The vast majority of child abuse victims do not become serial killers, of course, meaning that such abuse is not regarded as the sole trigger of such crimes in these cases.) Many power/control-motivated killers sexually abuse their victims, but they differ from hedonistic killers in that rape is not motivated by lust but as simply another form of dominating the victim.

Some serial killers may seem to have characteristics of more than one type. For example, British killer Peter Sutcliffe appeared to be both a visionary and a mission-oriented killer in that he claimed voices told him to clean up the streets of prostitutes. Alternatively, another school of thought classifies motive as being one of three types: need, greed, or power.


Actually most serial killers are opportunists, they seek out conditions that will allow them to kill repeatedly without detection or apprehension.

CK

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #155 on: March 31, 2008, 06:45:44 PM »

Actually most serial killers are opportunists, they seek out conditions that will allow them to kill repeatedly without detection or apprehension.


I agree, vignette, they are, but that does not mean they are not motivated by what the other poster listed. Take, for instance, Donald Harvey -- after he was dismissed from the military and the mental ward he spent the next few months trying to get his life back in order and eventually found work as a part-time nurses' aide at Cardinal Hill Hospital in Lexington. In June 1973, he started a second nursing job at Lexington's Good Samaritan Hospital. Harvey kept both jobs until August 1974, when he took up a job as a telephone operator, and then secured a clerical job at St. Luke's Hospital in Fort Thomas, Kentucky. He may have been able to control his urge to kill during this time, but the more feasible explanation would be that he did not have the same access to the patients as he did at Marymount Hospital, which could also explain why he shifted from job to job during this time.

He had not yet evolved enough to take his urges outside of the place he felt safe in committing his crimes -- the dimly lit patient rooms -- his killing sanctuaries. Harvey was a different kind of hunter and in order for him to get hold of his prey, he had to first find the right environment. In September 1975, Harvey moved back to Cincinnati, Ohio. Within weeks he got a job working night shift at the Cincinnati V.A. Medical Hospital. His duties varied and he performed several different tasks, depending on where he was needed at the time. He worked as a nursing assistant, housekeeping aide, cardiac-catheterization technician and autopsy assistant. Harvey had found his niche and wasted little time in starting where he had left off. Since he worked at night, he had very little supervision and unlimited access to virtually all areas of the hospital. Over the next 10 years, Harvey murdered at least 15 patients while working at the hospital.

Now when it comes to his motive, "Why did he kill?" he responded, "Well, people controlled me for 18 years, and then I controlled my own destiny. I controlled other people's lives, whether they lived or died. I had that power to control." And in response to the qeustion, "What right did you have to decide that?" he said, "After I didn't get caught for the first 15, I thought it was my right. I appointed myself judge, prosecutor and jury. So I played God."

ismile

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #156 on: April 05, 2008, 04:43:22 PM »

Synchronicity is the experience of two or more events which occur in a meaningful manner, but which are causally inexplicable to the person or persons experiencing them. The events would also have to suggest some underlying pattern in order to satisfy the definition of synchronicity as originally developed by Jung who coined the word to describe what he called "temporally coincident occurrences of acausal events." Jung variously described synchronicity as an "acausal connecting principle" (i.e. a pattern of connection that cannot be explained by direct causality), "meaningful coincidence" and "acausal parallelism".

It differs from mere coincidence in that synchronicity implies not just a happenstance, but an underlying pattern or dynamic expressed through meaningful relationships or events. Jung believed that many experiences perceived as coincidence were due not merely to chance, but instead, suggested the manifestation of parallel events or circumstances reflecting this governing dynamic.


Synchronicity happens when events in your life are all linked together, and these linked events all have the same meaning and they are occurring simultaneously. I've been noticing these synchronicities a lot after reading about them, and I noticed that it normally takes about 3-4 things with the same meaning to tie them all together and pinpoint its actual meaning. I was thinking lately that if we could learn to recognize these events earlier this could be a way of seeing into the future, or at least a way of gaining the meaning behind what is going to happen. Jung maintained that it elucidates meaningful arrangements and coincidence which somehow go beyond the calculations of probability. Pre-cognition, clairvoyance, telepathy, etc. are phenomena which are inexplicable through chance, but become empirically intelligible through the employment of the principle of synchronicity, which suggests a kind of harmony at work in the interrelation of both psychic and physical events.

slightlybehind

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Re: The Secret Cube
« Reply #157 on: April 17, 2008, 11:21:14 AM »

ex nihilo

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #158 on: April 21, 2008, 03:04:01 PM »

Synchronicity is the experience of two or more events which occur in a meaningful manner, but which are causally inexplicable to the person or persons experiencing them. The events would also have to suggest some underlying pattern in order to satisfy the definition of synchronicity as originally developed by Jung who coined the word to describe what he called "temporally coincident occurrences of acausal events." Jung variously described synchronicity as an "acausal connecting principle" (i.e. a pattern of connection that cannot be explained by direct causality), "meaningful coincidence" and "acausal parallelism".

It differs from mere coincidence in that synchronicity implies not just a happenstance, but an underlying pattern or dynamic expressed through meaningful relationships or events. Jung believed that many experiences perceived as coincidence were due not merely to chance, but instead, suggested the manifestation of parallel events or circumstances reflecting this governing dynamic.


Synchronicity happens when events in your life are all linked together, and these linked events all have the same meaning and they are occurring simultaneously. I've been noticing these synchronicities a lot after reading about them, and I noticed that it normally takes about 3-4 things with the same meaning to tie them all together and pinpoint its actual meaning. I was thinking lately that if we could learn to recognize these events earlier this could be a way of seeing into the future, or at least a way of gaining the meaning behind what is going to happen. Jung maintained that it elucidates meaningful arrangements and coincidence which somehow go beyond the calculations of probability. Pre-cognition, clairvoyance, telepathy, etc. are phenomena which are inexplicable through chance, but become empirically intelligible through the employment of the principle of synchronicity, which suggests a kind of harmony at work in the interrelation of both psychic and physical events.


Could you expand a bit papa?
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

brace

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #159 on: April 29, 2008, 01:14:16 PM »




Interesting illustration -- did you find it on Wiki?