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Author Topic: What's good about being an attorney?  (Read 45292 times)

wont

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #140 on: September 03, 2007, 01:02:59 AM »
Well, George, life would be impossible without lies and myths and fairy tales! :)

germania

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #141 on: September 24, 2007, 03:26:03 AM »

[...] In the "Psychology of Transference" Jung stated that in love, as in psychological growth, the key to success is the ability to endure the tension of opposites without abandoning the process, even if its results appear to have been brought to naught. In essence, it is the stress that allows one to grow and transform.


By 1913 Jung had extended Freud's definition, saying transference was also the basis for normal human relatedness. After breaking with Freud, he analyzed his own projections, resolved them to achieve emotional, intellectual, and spiritual/moral autonomy, and concurrently set forth the elements of his opus. A survey of early work shows recognition of counter-transference, the reciprocal arousal of unconscious content in the analyst in response to patient projections. In 1929 he stated his view that the personality of the analyst contributes to analytic process, and that transformation is mutual. He also observed instances of unconscious identity between doctor and patient, giving it the anthropological term participation mystique; later it was recognized by psychoanalysts and called projective identification. So convinced was Jung that this unconscious reciprocal influence distorted all analytic discourse that he drew upon another projective system, alchemy, in "Psychology of the Transference" (1946) to demonstrate the ubiquity of transference and to identify stages in its evolution and resolution.

For some students this represents an incomprehensible departure from rational scientific method. To appreciate its logic one must first accept the role of metaphor in psychological theory building and, second, understand Jung's theory of archetypes and his model of the psyche, which includes a personal and a collective unconscious. Although the concept of archetype has not been accepted by psychoanalysts, the idea has arisen independently in the fields of anthropology, linguistics, behavioral biology, and evolutional psychiatry. Briefly, the capacity to perceive certain forms and processes is inherent, and these ancient, typical potentials are released, to acquire specific psychological content when, in the course of development, the individual encounters external reality. The collective unconscious contains all realizable human potential.

The analytic process itself is unconsciously directed by the archetype of individuation, the impulse to grow in psychological depth and complexity, and is an inherent property of the self, the archetype that embraces and comprises all other archetypes. Transference thereby acquires a teleological dimension, the symbolic intent and meaning of which is revealed and experienced as analysis unfolds; this is its prospective aspect, in contrast to the regressive projection of unconscious material from infantile or other past experience. Jung recognized two universal, diametric archetypal urges in the individual psyche: to be separate, complete, and autonomous; and to be intimately bonded to the other, both coupled and enfolded in a group. These longings are primary motivating forces at the root of transference and resistance, constituting a fundamental paradox to be apprehended and resolved in individuation and analysis. Having this profound insight, he sought a metaphor to convey its universal, timeless, and impersonal meaning, to point analysands away from the average dependent/omnipotent transference fantasy. The mythology of medieval alchemy provided an unconscious projective system congenial enough to Western mentality to be accessible, but distant enough to reflect projections made in an analytic process that structures imaginative associations for the purpose of self examination. He chose a sixteenth-century treatise, the Rosarium Philosophorum, to reflect evolving transference/counter-transference fantasies in the analytic process.

All analytical psychologists view transference as a multileveled web of transecting relationships, interpersonal and intrapsychic, conscious and unconscious, occurring simultaneously within and between analyst and patient. Since the spiritual urge was regarded by Jung as an archetypal force equal to sexuality, his concept of transference extends into transpersonal realms. For some analytical psychologists this is the major thrust of Jungian theory, whereas others seek to correct theoretical and methodological gaps, (for example, in the areas of child development and transference) through links to the work of psychoanalysts whose constructions are compatible with Jung's basic concepts. Modern psychoanalytic theories of self, projective identification, mutuality, and intersubjectivity all have antecedents in work Jung completed before 1946.

V e r a

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #142 on: December 05, 2007, 04:43:39 PM »

[...] Understandably Bobby had done such a things many times before for fun (a tingling sensation results).


It was a very funny scene when the prosecutor asked Amos to cover his finger in lubricant to demonstrate how little coke would Roberta be able to introduce into her female private part had she done what Amos said she did!

aparka

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Re: The more things change the more they are the same
« Reply #143 on: February 27, 2008, 02:14:09 PM »


-- Visionary

Contrary to popular opinion, serial killers are rarely insane or motivated by hallucinations and/or voices in their heads. Many claim to be, usually as a way of trying to get acquitted by reason of insanity [...]


Sorry, but visionary serial killers murder in response to voices, or visions urging them to kill. This type of killer is most usually classified as psychotic.


bon gre mal gre

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #144 on: March 05, 2008, 11:31:31 AM »
Awesome prime germania!

club foot

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #145 on: March 05, 2008, 02:20:47 PM »

Napoleon Bonoparte does not really qualify as a "genius" -- while known to have had an IQ of 145, his adjusted IQ with Flynn Effect is only 123.


aflciu, what exactly is this "Flynn Effect"?

club foot

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #146 on: March 05, 2008, 02:42:11 PM »
aflciu, what exactly is this Flynn Effect?

l o l a

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #147 on: March 06, 2008, 11:04:33 AM »

aflciu, what exactly is this Flynn Effect?


Interesting username, clubfoot - it reminded me of Josef Goebbels, the notorious Nazi propaganda minister - he had a right club foot (possibly incurred after birth as a complication of osteomyelitis), a fact hidden from the German public by censorship. Because of this malformation, Goebbels needed to wear a leg brace. That, plus his short stature, led to his rejection for military service in World War I.

jensa

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #148 on: March 06, 2008, 02:41:28 PM »

aflciu, what exactly is this Flynn Effect?


Interesting username, clubfoot - it reminded me of Josef Goebbels, the notorious Nazi propaganda minister - he had a right club foot (possibly incurred after birth as a complication of osteomyelitis), a fact hidden from the German public by censorship. Because of this malformation, Goebbels needed to wear a leg brace. That, plus his short stature, led to his rejection for military service in World War I.


A friend of mine gave birth to a clubfooted child -- they treated him immediately upon birth, within the first week of life (they manipulate to correct the condition and then cast to maintain the correction; casting begun at a later age may be more difficult due to the worsening ligamentous contracture and joint deformity). Long-leg plaster casts are used to maintain the corrections obtained through manipulations. Casts are changed at weekly intervals, and most deformities are corrected in 2-3 months. Before applying the last plaster cast, which is to be worn for 3 weeks, the Achilles tendon is often cut in an office procedure to complete the correction of the foot. By the time the cast is removed the tendon has regenerated to a proper length. After the last cast is removed, the foot should appear overcorrected.



Despite successful initial treatment, clubfeet have a natural tendency to recur. Bracing is necessary for several years to prevent relapses. There are several different braces that are commonly prescribed. All braces consist of a bar (the length of which is the distance between the child's shoulders) with either shoes, sandals, or custom-made orthoses attached at the ends of the bar in about 70 degrees of external rotation. The bar can be either solid (both legs move together) or dynamic (each leg can move independently). The brace is worn 23 hours a day for 3 months and then at nighttime for 3-4 years. 

zan

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #149 on: March 07, 2008, 03:21:49 PM »
jensa, when parents are faced with this disaster of seeing a baby born with clubfeet, they get to be very depressed.When they go to the doctor and are told that their baby must have surgery, they are sad. But when they can see that this deformity is nothing, that is a very easy thing to correct and the child is normal, they have hope. Extensive surgery does not "cure" clubfoot. It improves the appearance of the foot but diminishes the strength of the muscles in the foot and leg and causes stiffness in the second and third decade of life (if not earlier). This limits the motions of the foot joints, and the foot becomes often painful at midlife. Extensive surgery does not prevent the recurrence of the deformity in a number of cases. No followup studies of operated patients older than 16 years of age have been published to date; therefore, orthopaedic surgeons are ignorant of the results of their surgeries.