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Author Topic: What's good about being an attorney?  (Read 45765 times)

abstemious

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #130 on: August 17, 2007, 08:15:16 AM »
Apparently!

cynosure

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Re: Experts Split on Whether Chief Justice Roberts Has Epilepsy
« Reply #131 on: August 19, 2007, 02:21:59 AM »

"There are a lot of different causes that can be responsible for a seizure other than epilepsy, and some of those are very hard to detect with a regular MRI. They require more sophisticated tests," said Dr. Isabelle Germano, a professor of neurosurgery at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. Germano agreed that two seizures are, by definition, epilepsy. "But, usually in the adult population, we don't see a 14-year interval between seizures," she said. "The delayed interval might make it something else."


That's something to look into.

defile

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #132 on: August 19, 2007, 02:51:28 AM »

The modern lawyer is haunted not by guilt but by anxiety. He seeks not to inflict his own certainties on others but to find a meaning in life. Liberated from the superstitions of the past, he doubts even the reality of his own existence ... His sexual attitudes are permissive rather than puritanical, even though his emancipation from ancient taboos brings him no sexual peace.

Fiercely competitive in his demand for approval and acclaim, he distrusts competition because he associates it unconsciously with an unbridled urge to destroy ... He (harbours) deeply antisocial impulses. He praises respect for rules and regulations in the secret belief that they do not apply to himself. Acquisitive in the sense that his cravings have no limits, he ... demands immediate gratification and lives in a state of restless, perpetually unsatisfied desire.

The lawyers' pronounced lack of empathy, off-handed exploitativeness, grandiose fantasies and uncompromising sense of entitlement make him treat all people as though they were objects (he "objectifies" people). He regards others as either useful conduits for and sources of narcissistic supply (attention, adulation, etc.) -- or as extensions of himself. Similarly, serial killers often mutilate their victims and abscond with trophies -- usually, body parts. Some of them have been known to eat the organs they have ripped -- an act of merging with the dead and assimilating them through digestion. They treat their victims as some children do their rag dolls.

Killing the victim -- often capturing him or her on film before the murder -- is a form of exerting unmitigated, absolute, and irreversible control over it. The serial killer aspires to "freeze time" in the still perfection that he has choreographed. The victim is motionless and defenseless. The killer attains long sought "object permanence". The victim is unlikely to run on the serial assassin, or vanish as earlier objects in the killer's life (e.g., his parents) have done.


This sounds more appropriate for serial killers than lawyers.. Are you sure it's lawyers you're talking about?

asperity

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Re: Experts Split on Whether Chief Justice Roberts Has Epilepsy
« Reply #133 on: August 19, 2007, 08:27:34 PM »

"There are a lot of different causes that can be responsible for a seizure other than epilepsy, and some of those are very hard to detect with a regular MRI. They require more sophisticated tests," said Dr. Isabelle Germano, a professor of neurosurgery at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. Germano agreed that two seizures are, by definition, epilepsy. "But, usually in the adult population, we don't see a 14-year interval between seizures," she said. "The delayed interval might make it something else."


That's something to look into.


You mean the 14-yr interval ?

garnish

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #134 on: August 21, 2007, 07:02:23 AM »
Of course, asperity, what else?!

dissipate

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #135 on: August 21, 2007, 09:21:14 PM »

I hope elipepsy doesn't kill him, but lays him just low enough to linger until we have a Democratic president take office in '09, THEN he takes his well-deserved dirt nap. Roberts is an evil, corrupt, ruthless tool of corporate America and people like him will stop at nothing to grant their masters all kinds of legal goodies via the Supreme Court at the expense of average working Americans. This bastard is helping to build the new Fascist America that we all are currently living in. Wake up people! I hope they get everything coming to them, and moreso.

Roberts is a joke as a Supreme Court Justice, let alone Chief Justice. Frankly, I'd rather see that fat prick, Scalia, bite the big one, but we're not that lucky. Hey, maybe a bunch of those self-important cretins will die prematurely when the Democratic president takes office in 09. Just saying what everyone's thinking. Remember who the enemy is.


If only the solution could be a Democratic president!

moelaw

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #136 on: August 26, 2007, 10:17:48 PM »

Synchronicity is the experience of two or more events which occur in a meaningful manner, but which are causally inexplicable to the person or persons experiencing them. The events would also have to suggest some underlying pattern in order to satisfy the definition of synchronicity as originally developed by Jung who coined the word to describe what he called "temporally coincident occurrences of acausal events." Jung variously described synchronicity as an "acausal connecting principle" (i.e. a pattern of connection that cannot be explained by direct causality), "meaningful coincidence" and "acausal parallelism".

It differs from mere coincidence in that synchronicity implies not just a happenstance, but an underlying pattern or dynamic expressed through meaningful relationships or events. Jung believed that many experiences perceived as coincidence were due not merely to chance, but instead, suggested the manifestation of parallel events or circumstances reflecting this governing dynamic.



The Law of Attraction and Manifestation

Synchronicities are patterns that repeat in time. The word synchronicity references the gears or wheels of time, though the actual concept of synchronicity cannot be scientifically proven. One can only record synchronicities as they occur and watch the patterns of behavior that create them. The concept of synchronicity is currently linked more to metaphysics, yet physics (quantum physics) and metaphysics are merging, thus showing their interconnection and how we manifest synchronicities in our lives. We have all heard the expression, "There are no accidents." This is true. All that we experience is by design, and what we attract to our physical world. There are no accidents just synchronicity wheels, the wheels of time or karma, wheels within wheels, sacred geometry, the evolution of consciousness in the alchemy of time.

Jung maintained that synchronicities are meaningful coincidences. Temporally coincident occurrences of acausal events. It was a principle that he felt compassed his concept of the collective unconscious, in that it was descriptive of a governing dynamic that underlay the whole of human experience and history, social, emotional, psychological, and spiritual. Jung believed that many experiences perceived as coincidence were due not merely to chance, but instead potentially reflected the manifestation of coincident events or circumstances consequent to this governing dynamic. Jung spoke of synchronicity as being an "acausal connecting principle" (ie. a pattern of connection that is not explained by causality). Jung believed the traditional notions of causality were incapable of explaining some of the more improbable forms of coincidence. Where it is plain, felt Jung, that no causal connection can be demonstrated between two events, but where a meaningful relationship nevertheless exists between them, a wholly different type of principle is likely to be operating. Jung called this principle "synchronicity."

In The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche, Jung describes how, during his research into the phenomenon of the collective unconscious, he began to observe coincidences that were connected in such a meaningful way that their occurrence seemed to defy the calculations of probability. He provided numerous examples from his own psychiatric case-studies, many now legendary.

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"A young woman I was treating had, at a critical moment, a dream in which she was given a golden scarab. While she was telling me her dream, I sat with my back to the closed window. Suddenly I heard a noise behind me, like a gentle tapping. I turned round and saw a flying insect knocking against the window-pane from outside. I opened the window and caught the creature in the air as it flew in. It was the nearest analogy to the golden scarab that one finds in our latitudes, a scarabaeid beetle, the common rose-chafer (Cetoaia urata) which contrary to its usual habits had evidently felt an urge to get into a dark room at this particular moment. I must admit that nothing like it ever happened to me before or since, and that the dream of the patient has remained unique in my experience." The Scarab represented Self-Generation, Resurrection and Renewal.

Who then, might we say, was responsible for the synchronous arrival of the beetle, Jung or the patient? While on the surface reasonable, such a question presupposes a chain of causality Jung claimed was absent from such experience. As psychoanalyst Nandor Fodor has observed, the scarab, by Jung's view, had no determinable cause, but instead complemented the "impossibility" of the analysis. The disturbance also (as synchronicities often do) prefigured a profound transformation. For, as Fodor observes, Jung's patient had--until the appearance of the beetle -- shown excessive rationality, remaining psychologically inaccessible. Once presented with the scarab, however, she improved. Because Jung believed the phenomenon of synchronicity was primarily connected with psychic conditions, he felt that such couplings of inner (subjective) and outer (objective) reality evolved through the influence of the archetypes, patterns inherent in the human psyche and shared by all of mankind. These patterns, or "primordial images," as Jung sometimes refers to them, comprise man's collective unconscious, representing the dynamic source of all human confrontation with death, conflict, love, sex, rebirth and mystical experience. When an archetype is activated by an emotionally charged event (such as a tragedy), says Jung, other related events tend to draw near. In this way the archetypes become a doorway that provide us access to the experience of meaningful (and often insightful) coincidence.

Implicit in Jung's concept of synchronicity is the belief in the ultimate "oneness" of the universe. As Jung expressed it, such phenomenon betrays a "peculiar interdependence of objective elements among themselves as well as with the subjective (psychic) states of the observer or observers." Jung claimed to have found evidence of this interdependence, not only in his psychiatric studies, but in his research of esoteric practices as well. Of the I Ching, a Chinese method of divination which Jung regarded as the clearest expression of the synchronicity principle, he wrote:

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"The Chinese mind, as I see it at work in the I Ching, seems to be exclusively preoccupied with the chance aspect of events. What we call coincidence seems to be the chief concern of this peculiar mind, and what we worship as causality passes almost unnoticed...While the Western mind carefully sifts, weighs, selects, classifies, isolates, the Chinese picture of the moment encompasses everything down to the minutes nonsensical detail, because all of the ingredients make up the observed moment."

Jung discovered the synchronicity within the I Ching also extended to astrology. In a letter to Freud dated June 12, 1911, he wrote:

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"My evenings are taken up largely with astrology. I make horoscopic calculations in order to find a clue to the core of psychological truth. Some remarkable things have turned up which will certainly appear incredible to you...I dare say that we shall one day discover in astrology a good deal of knowledge that has been intuitively projected into the heavens."

In formulating his synchronicity principle, Jung was influenced to a profound degree by the "new" physics of the twentieth century, which had begun to explore the possible role of consciousness in the physical world. In 1945 Jung wrote

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Physics has demonstrated that in the realm of atomic magnitudes objective reality presupposes an observer, and that only on this condition is a satisfactory scheme of explanation possible. This means, that a subjective element attaches to the physicist's world picture, and secondly that a connection necessarily exists between the psyche to be explained and the objective space-time continuum. These discoveries not only help loosen physics from the iron grip of its materialistic world, but confirmed what I recognized intuitively that matter and consciousness, far from operating independently of each other are, in fact, interconnected in an essential way, functioning as complementary aspects of a unified reality.

The belief suggested by quantum theory and by reports of synchronous events that matter and consciousness interact, is far from new. Synchronicity reveals the meaningful connections between the subjective and objective world. Synchronistic events provide an immediate religious experience as a direct encounter with the compensatory patterning of events in nature as a whole, both inwardly and outwardly.
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moelaw

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #137 on: August 26, 2007, 10:18:57 PM »
Jung's Model

All synchronistic phenomena can be grouped under three categories:

1. The coincidence of a psychic state in the observer with a simultaneous objective, external event that corresponds to the psychic state or content, (e.g. the scarab), where there is no evidence of a causal connection between the psychic state and the external event, and where, considering the psychic relativity of space and time, such a connection is not even conceivable.

2. The coincidence of a psychic state with a corresponding (more or less simultaneous) external even taking place outside the observer's field of perception, i.e. at a distance, and only verifiable afterward.

3. The coincidence of a psychic state with a corresponding, not yet existent future event that is distant in time and can likewise only be verified afterward.

Two Fundamental Types of Synchronicity

1. One in which the compensatory activity of the archetype is experienced both inwardly and outwardly. [the event seems to emerge from the subconscious with access to absolute knowledge, which cannot be consciously known]

2. One in which the compensatory activity of the archetype is experienced outwardly only. [these convey to the ego a much-needed wholeness of the self's perspective, they show one a new perspective]


Essential Characteristics of the Synchronistic Event

1. The specific intrapsychic state of the subject defined as one of the following:

a) The unconscious content which, in accordance with the compensatory needs of the conscious orientation, enters consciousness [something is in our conscious]
b) The conscious orientation of the subject around which the compensatory synchronistic activity centers [something happens concerning what is in our mind]

2. An objective event corresponds with this intrapsychic state [may be literal or figurative correspondence]

a) The objective event as a compensatory equivalent to the unconscious compensatory content
b) The objective event as the sole compensatory of the ego-consciousness

3. Even though the intrapsychic state and the objective event may be synchronous according to clock time and spatially near to each other, the objective event may, contrary to this, be distant in time and/or space in relation to the intrapsychic state [as in telepathy, clairvoyance, etc.]

4. The intrapsychic state and the objective event are not causally related to each other [acausality]

5. The synchronistic event is meaningful [excludes some coincidence, but does not require the meaning to be understood]

a) The intrapsychic state and the objective event as meaningful parallels.

b) The numinous charge associated with the synchronistic experience [feeling of spiritual experience]

c) Import of the subjective-level interpretation [the content must reflect back on the issues of the individual]

d) The archetypal level of meaning [transcends the individual and implies absolute knowledge].
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one hot summer night

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #138 on: August 27, 2007, 03:11:57 AM »

[...] All that we experience is by design, and what we attract to our physical world. There are no accidents just synchronicity wheels, the wheels of time or karma, wheels within wheels, sacred geometry, the evolution of consciousness in the alchemy of time.


For Jung, alchemy was not the search for a way to transform lead into gold, but the transformation of the soul on its path to perfection. Jung's dreams in 1926 frequently found him in ancient places surrounded by alchemical codices of great beauty and mystery. Jung amassed a library on the great art which represents one of the finest private collections in this field. In 1944 Jung published "Psychology and Alchemy" in which he argues for a reevaluation of the symbolism of Alchemy as being intimately related to the psychoanalytical process. Using a cycle of dreams of one of his patients he shows how the symbols used by the alchemists occur in the psyche as part of the reservoir of mythological images drawn upon by the individual in their dream states. Jung draws an analogy between the Great Work of the Alchemists and the process of reintegration and individuation of the psyche in the modern psychiatric patient.

Jung believed that the cosmos contained the divine light or life, but this essence was enmeshed in a mathematical trap, presided over by a demiurge, Lucifer, the Bringer of Light. Lucifer contained the light inside this reality, until a time when it would be set free. The first operation of alchemy therefore addressed itself to the dismemberment of this confining structure, reducing it to the condition of creative chaos. From this, in the process of transformation, the true, creative binaries emerge and begin their interaction designed to bring the alchemical union. In this ultimate union, says Jung, the previously confined light is redeemed and brought to the point of its ultimate and redemptive fulfillment. Jung made it clear that his theory was not new. It is similar to the Catharism and he stated that he was restating the Hermetic Gnosis and explaining the misunderstood central quest of alchemy. Jung believed that alchemy stood in a compensatory relationship to mainstream Christianity, rather like a dream does to the conscious attitudes of the dreamer. It has been has been hidden underground, part of a secret tradition that ran throughout Christianity, but always subconsciousness -- visible by its shadows and the traces it leaves. He also felt that this process allowed for better understanding of male-female relationships, and the concept of love. In the Psychology of Transference Jung stated that in love, as in psychological growth, the key to success is the ability to endure the tension of opposites without abandoning the process, even if its results appear to have been brought to naught. In essence, it is the stress that allows one to grow and transform.

The union of opposites, the focus of the alchemist, was for Jung also the focus of Gnostics, whom he felt had been incorrectly labeled as radical dualists, i.e. believing in the battle between good and evil without any apparent union possible between the two. For Jung, dualism and monism were not mutually contradictory and exclusive, but complimentary aspects of reality. As such, there was no right and wrong, no order or chaos, just two opposites, duality, polarities, that created a means to reconciliation and balance into enlightenment. In a maner of speaking one could call Carl Jung the Father if the New Age of Consciousness, giving a theoretical framework for channeling and other New Age practices that allow consciousness to expand outside the box of antiquated thinking. In the end, Carl Jung stated that such opposites must be integrated. Zoroaster calls this Zero Point.

sislaw

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #139 on: August 27, 2007, 06:57:09 AM »

[...] Because Jung believed the phenomenon of synchronicity was primarily connected with psychic conditions, he felt that such couplings of inner (subjective) and outer (objective) reality evolved through the influence of the archetypes, patterns inherent in the human psyche and shared by all of mankind. These patterns, or "primordial images," as Jung sometimes refers to them, comprise man's collective unconscious, representing the dynamic source of all human confrontation with death, conflict, love, sex, rebirth and mystical experience. When an archetype is activated by an emotionally charged event (such as a tragedy), says Jung, other related events tend to draw near. In this way the archetypes become a doorway that provide us access to the experience of meaningful (and often insightful) coincidence. [...]

Archetypes are visual symbols or energetic imprints that exist in our psyches. Some are readily understood while others bring subliminal messages that are there to help you trigger your memory of why you are here and the truth behind the illusion of reality. Archetypes can often convey messages that verbal and written information cannot. Archetypes are found everywhere, as their symbols are a language of the mind, taken to different frequencies of thought and connected to each other by the collective unconsciousness. There are individual and universal archetypes. You become aware of them in meditation, dreamtime, remote viewing or other out-of-body experiences, when you doodle on a pad, crop circles or landscape art, other art forms, jewelry, hieroglyphs, a logo, on a billboard, anywhere at all. Archetypes can also be auditory, a tone, a series of notes, a harmonic. Reality is a series of metaphors set into motion by the synchronicity of archetypes we experience.

The term Archetype began with Jung. In Jung's terms, 'Archetype' is defined as the first original model of which all other similar persons, objects, or concepts are merely derivative, copied, patterned, or emulated. These patterns derive from a universal collective unconscious which in metaphysics is called the Grids, Akashic Records, Sea of Consciousness, that which creates our reality. In this context, archetypes are innate prototypes for ideas, which may subsequently become involved in the interpretation of observed phenomena. Master or Universal archetypes are created by the patterns of Sacred Geometry. The remainder are derivatives of these patterns.