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Author Topic: What's good about being an attorney?  (Read 46944 times)

aflciu

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #120 on: August 07, 2007, 06:06:28 PM »

[...]Napoleon Bonaparte was probably the most brilliant military figure in history. He too is known to have had epilepsy. [...]


Napoleon Bonoparte does not really qualify as a "genius" -- while known to have had an IQ of 145, his adjusted IQ with Flynn Effect is only 123.

Elaine Cho

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Re: Roberts v. Epilepsy
« Reply #121 on: August 07, 2007, 08:59:24 PM »

[...]

From his writings we know a lot about the epilepsy of the great Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoevsky, author of such classics as Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, who is considered by many to have brought the Western novel to the peak of its possibilities. Dostoevsky had his first seizure at age 9. After a remission which lasted up to age 25, he had seizures every few days or months, fluctuating between good and bad periods. His ecstatic auras occurring seconds before his bigger seizures were moments of transcendent happiness, which then changed to an anguished feeling of dread. He saw a blinding flash of light, then would cry out and lose consciousness for a second or two. Sometimes the epileptic discharge generalized across his brain, producing a secondary tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizure. [...]


So basically his remission lasted 16 years, just like Roberts' ?

Ibrow

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #122 on: August 09, 2007, 05:32:36 AM »
1. Despite being handsome, brilliant, rich, and nice -- in other words, prime marriage material -- Judge Roberts didn't get married until the relatively late age of 41.

2. With all due respect to the perfectly attractive Mrs. Jane Sullivan Roberts, some readers have commented that the #5 Superhottie of the Federal Judiciary could have "married someone hotter." According to a correspondent who used to work at Hogan & Hartson, Judge Roberts's former law firm, "many of the older [Hogan] attys are married to good-looking 20-somethings after having dumped their first wives."

3. Judge and Mrs. Roberts have adopted rather than biological children. (The "theory" behind this fact, it seems, is that we therefore have no "proof" of the consummation of the Roberts' marriage.)

4. Judge Roberts has associated with gay people in the past:

(a) As everyone knows by now, he did pro bono work on behalf of gay rights activists, helping out colleagues in their preparation of court filings and oral argument in Romer v. Evans, 517 U.S. 620 (1996).

(b) While Judge Roberts was at Harvard, his pre-law advisor was William LaPiana, a law professor at New York Law School and an openly gay man.

(c) One reader commented that "Roberts has had at least one gay (male) clerk while sitting on the D.C. Cir. I suspect at least one other clerk as well." It appears that Judge Roberts may have had one gay clerk.

5. Finally, in terms of evidence of gayness, let's not leave out the notorious plaid pants.

So there's certainly some grist for the "Judge Roberts is gay" rumor mill in his past. New York Times threw more fuel on the fire, in the form of a rather interesting article about Judge Roberts's time at Harvard and what it was like to be a campus conservative there during the 1970's. There are two noteworthy aspects of this article from the "John Roberts Is Gay" point of view. First, check out the provocative third paragraph -- surprisingly high placement, essentially part of the lede -- of Janny Scott's piece:

Quote

"Conservatives were like the queers on campus," said Eric Rofes, a classmate of Judge Roberts who later became an organizer on gay issues. "People made fun of them. They mocked them and saw them as jokers or losers. I don't think in the moment many people realized this was the start of an ascending movement. People felt it was like the last cry of the 1950's."


Second, directly to the left of the foregoing paragraph in the online version of the article is a photograph (courtesy Don Scherer) showing Judge Roberts hanging out on Martha's Vineyard with two handsome male friends, Don Scherer and Richard Lazarus. Call Article Three Groupie crazy -- you wouldn't be the first -- but the picture strikes her as pretty "gay-looking."


K a r i

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #123 on: August 10, 2007, 04:36:24 AM »

These seizures take many forms and particularly mimic epileptic seizures; they are distinguished from epilepsy only in that they are not associated with abnormal, rhythmic discharges of cortical neurons. The condition is not benign; people have broken bones, crashed automobiles, bitten off parts of their tongue, and even died from injuries sustained during non-epileptic seizures. An older term for these, pseudoseizures, should not be used. While it is correct that a non-epileptic seizure may resemble an epileptic seizure, pseudo can also connote "false, fraudulent, or pretending to be something that it is not." Non-epileptic seizures are not false, fraudulent, or produced under any sort of pretense.


So basically his seizures would have no organic cause, occuring only in the presence of others (never at sleep) with him never really hurting himself or having any attacks of urinary incontinence, faking it all the way?


That's not the poster you quoted suggested. You have genuine epileptics, hystero-epileptics, and epileptic fakers.

aver

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #124 on: August 11, 2007, 12:15:37 AM »

1. Despite being handsome, brilliant, rich, and nice -- in other words, prime marriage material -- Judge Roberts didn't get married until the relatively late age of 41.

2. With all due respect to the perfectly attractive Mrs. Jane Sullivan Roberts, some readers have commented that the #5 Superhottie of the Federal Judiciary could have "married someone hotter." According to a correspondent who used to work at Hogan & Hartson, Judge Roberts's former law firm, "many of the older [Hogan] attys are married to good-looking 20-somethings after having dumped their first wives."

3. Judge and Mrs. Roberts have adopted rather than biological children. (The "theory" behind this fact, it seems, is that we therefore have no "proof" of the consummation of the Roberts' marriage.)

4. Judge Roberts has associated with gay people in the past:

(a) As everyone knows by now, he did pro bono work on behalf of gay rights activists, helping out colleagues in their preparation of court filings and oral argument in Romer v. Evans, 517 U.S. 620 (1996).

(b) While Judge Roberts was at Harvard, his pre-law advisor was William LaPiana, a law professor at New York Law School and an openly gay man.

(c) One reader commented that "Roberts has had at least one gay (male) clerk while sitting on the D.C. Cir. I suspect at least one other clerk as well." It appears that Judge Roberts may have had one gay clerk.

5. Finally, in terms of evidence of gayness, let's not leave out the notorious plaid pants.

So there's certainly some grist for the "Judge Roberts is gay" rumor mill in his past. New York Times threw more fuel on the fire, in the form of a rather interesting article about Judge Roberts's time at Harvard and what it was like to be a campus conservative there during the 1970's. There are two noteworthy aspects of this article from the "John Roberts Is Gay" point of view. First, check out the provocative third paragraph -- surprisingly high placement, essentially part of the lede -- of Janny Scott's piece:

Quote

"Conservatives were like the queers on campus," said Eric Rofes, a classmate of Judge Roberts who later became an organizer on gay issues. "People made fun of them. They mocked them and saw them as jokers or losers. I don't think in the moment many people realized this was the start of an ascending movement. People felt it was like the last cry of the 1950's."


Second, directly to the left of the foregoing paragraph in the online version of the article is a photograph (courtesy Don Scherer) showing Judge Roberts hanging out on Martha's Vineyard with two handsome male friends, Don Scherer and Richard Lazarus. Call Article Three Groupie crazy -- you wouldn't be the first -- but the picture strikes her as pretty "gay-looking."




Intriguing argument!
Workers of the world unite; you have nothing to lose but your chains.

imbroglio

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #125 on: August 13, 2007, 08:13:47 AM »

3. Judge and Mrs. Roberts have adopted rather than biological children.


Maybe he's just sterile! Or she's infertile!

tytyty

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #126 on: August 14, 2007, 08:42:15 AM »

A woman told her physician that her husband had developed a penchant for anal sex, and she wasn't sure that it was a good idea.
The doctor asked: "Do you enjoy it?"
She said that she loves it.
He asked: "Does it hurt?"
She said that it feels wonderful.
The doctor then told her: "Well, then there's no reason that you shouldn't have anal sex, just take care not to get pregnant."
The surprised woman asked: "You can get pregnant from anal sex?"
The doctor replied: "Sure. Where do you think lawyers come from."


One day a young lawyer and his wife were in their bedroom making love. All of a sudden a bumble bee entered the bedroom window. As the young lady parted her legs the bee entered her vagina. The woman started screaming "Oh my god, help me, there's a bee in my vagina!" The lawyer immediately took her to the local doctor and explained the situation.

The doctor thought for a moment and said "Hmm, tricky situation. But I have a solution to the problem if young sir would permit." The husband being very concerned agreed that the doctor could use whatever method to get the bee out of his wife's vagina. The doctor said "OK, what I'm gonna do is rub some honey over the top of my penis and insert it into your wife's vagina. When I feel the bee getting closer to the tip of my penis I shall withdraw it and the bee should hopefully follow my penis out of your wife's vagina. The husband nodded and gave his approval. The young lady said "Yes, Yes, whatever, just get on with it."

So the doctor, after covering the tip of his penis with honey, inserted it into the young lady's vagina. After a few gentle strokes, the doctor said, "I don't think the bee has noticed the honey yet. Perhaps I should go a bit deeper." So the doctor went deeper and deeper. After a while the doctor began shafting the young lady very hard indeed.

The young lady began to quiver with excitement. She began to moan and groan aloud. The doctor, concentrating very hard, looked like he was enjoying himself, he then put his hands on the young lady's breasts and started making loud noises. The lawyer at this point suddenly became very annoyed and shouted, "Now wait a minute! What the Hell do you think you're doing?" The doctor, still concentrating, replied, "Change of plan. I'm gonna drown the bastard!"

deja vu

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #127 on: August 15, 2007, 08:04:18 PM »




I can not believe that a rather good-looking guy like Roberts is a conservative!

affable

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #128 on: August 16, 2007, 08:06:50 AM »
Uh, there's nothing strange about it, deja vu, you've so many good-looking lawyers out there whom you'd want to send them to Cuba for being incorrigible racist, sexist pricks!

brindled

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #129 on: August 16, 2007, 10:23:58 AM »

The modern lawyer is haunted not by guilt but by anxiety. He seeks not to inflict his own certainties on others but to find a meaning in life. Liberated from the superstitions of the past, he doubts even the reality of his own existence ... His sexual attitudes are permissive rather than puritanical, even though his emancipation from ancient taboos brings him no sexual peace.

Fiercely competitive in his demand for approval and acclaim, he distrusts competition because he associates it unconsciously with an unbridled urge to destroy ... He (harbours) deeply antisocial impulses. He praises respect for rules and regulations in the secret belief that they do not apply to himself. Acquisitive in the sense that his cravings have no limits, he ... demands immediate gratification and lives in a state of restless, perpetually unsatisfied desire.

The lawyers' pronounced lack of empathy, off-handed exploitativeness, grandiose fantasies and uncompromising sense of entitlement make him treat all people as though they were objects (he "objectifies" people). He regards others as either useful conduits for and sources of narcissistic supply (attention, adulation, etc.) -- or as extensions of himself. Similarly, serial killers often mutilate their victims and abscond with trophies -- usually, body parts. Some of them have been known to eat the organs they have ripped -- an act of merging with the dead and assimilating them through digestion. They treat their victims as some children do their rag dolls.

Killing the victim -- often capturing him or her on film before the murder -- is a form of exerting unmitigated, absolute, and irreversible control over it. The serial killer aspires to "freeze time" in the still perfection that he has choreographed. The victim is motionless and defenseless. The killer attains long sought "object permanence". The victim is unlikely to run on the serial assassin, or vanish as earlier objects in the killer's life (e.g., his parents) have done.


So basically need to control is the keyword here ??