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Author Topic: What's good about being an attorney?  (Read 47136 times)

sinus

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #110 on: August 01, 2007, 08:53:56 PM »

[...] Understandably Bobby had done such a things many times before for fun (a tingling sensation results).


Roberta had not done herself that sort of thing before -- she had put powder cocaine in her female private part (with lubricant so that it'd stick); she never injected herself with coke dissolved in water.


Roberta is partly to blame -- she should have not left Lowell "Edwin" Amos to come back in her life! The movie makes it clear that she gave him another chance when she shouldn't have.
Hypocrite reader -- my likeness -- my brother!

harbinger

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Roberts v. Epilepsy
« Reply #111 on: August 01, 2007, 09:57:27 PM »

[...] Another expert believes it's too soon to say that Roberts has epilepsy. "There are a lot of different causes that can be responsible for a seizure other than epilepsy, and some of those are very hard to detect with a regular MRI. They require more sophisticated tests," said Dr. Isabelle Germano, a professor of neurosurgery at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. Germano agreed that two seizures are, by definition, epilepsy. "But, usually in the adult population, we don't see a 14-year interval between seizures," she said. "The delayed interval might make it something else."

[...]


He suffers a generalized tonic-clonic drop seizure and they're saying he may not have epilepsy?! St. George Ambulance responded because he had fallen 5-10 ft. and landed on a dock, hitting the back of his head. He was ashen and was foaming at the mouth. The Supreme Court spokeswoman says Roberts was conscious the entire time, but she did not returned a telephone call to the MaineCostNow.



refurbished sun

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Re: Roberts v. Epilepsy
« Reply #114 on: August 03, 2007, 10:01:50 PM »

[...] Another expert believes it's too soon to say that Roberts has epilepsy. "There are a lot of different causes that can be responsible for a seizure other than epilepsy, and some of those are very hard to detect with a regular MRI. They require more sophisticated tests," said Dr. Isabelle Germano, a professor of neurosurgery at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. Germano agreed that two seizures are, by definition, epilepsy. "But, usually in the adult population, we don't see a 14-year interval between seizures," she said. "The delayed interval might make it something else."

[...]


He suffers a generalized tonic-clonic drop seizure and they're saying he may not have epilepsy?! St. George Ambulance responded because he had fallen 5-10 ft. and landed on a dock, hitting the back of his head. He was ashen and was foaming at the mouth. The Supreme Court spokeswoman says Roberts was conscious the entire time, but she did not returned a telephone call to the MaineCostNow.


He may also be a case of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, or in other words, hystero-epilepsy. Dostoevsky, for example, called himself an epileptic, and was regarded as such by other people, but this so-called epilepsy was only a symptom of his neurosis, better classified as hystero-epilepsy. Dostoevsky's attacks did not assume epileptic form until after his eighteenth year, when his father was murdered.

These seizures take many forms and particularly mimic epileptic seizures; they are distinguished from epilepsy only in that they are not associated with abnormal, rhythmic discharges of cortical neurons. The condition is not benign; people have broken bones, crashed automobiles, bitten off parts of their tongue, and even died from injuries sustained during non-epileptic seizures. An older term for these, pseudoseizures, should not be used. While it is correct that a non-epileptic seizure may resemble an epileptic seizure, pseudo can also connote "false, fraudulent, or pretending to be something that it is not." Non-epileptic seizures are not false, fraudulent, or produced under any sort of pretense.

etc

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Re: Roberts v. Epilepsy
« Reply #115 on: August 03, 2007, 10:19:32 PM »

TUESDAY, July 31 -- U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts walked out of a Maine hospital Tuesday morning with a clean bill of health, one day after suffering a seizure and falling on a dock near his summer home. But doctors interviewed were divided on whether the seizure -- the second one the 52-year-old jurist has suffered in 14 years -- is a sign that Roberts has epilepsy, a neurological condition that could require him to take anti-seizure medication to control the disorder. Roberts left Penobscot Bay Medical Center in Rockport shortly before noon after suffering what doctors described as an unexplained seizure near his vacation home in Port Clyde on Hupper Island. The doctors who examined him found no sign of a tumor, stroke or any other explanation for the episode. He plans to continue his summer vacation, Supreme Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg told the Associated Press. Roberts' first reported seizure occurred while playing golf in 1993.

Dr. Steven Pacia, chief of neurology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said that, given this was Roberts' second seizure, it's "likely" that he has epilepsy. "It's the most likely thing based on what we know from what's been released," he said. Pacia noted that seizures can result from an inherited susceptibility that is trigged by such factors as a lack of sleep or stress. "It sounds to me he does have idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndrome, which means that he has susceptibility to seizures under certain circumstances," he said. Dr. Laura Kalayjian, an assistant professor of neurology and co-director of the Epilepsy Center at the University of Southern California, agreed that Roberts probably has epilepsy. "The definition of epilepsy is two unprovoked seizures," Kalayjian said. The likelihood of someone having a second seizure after a first one is about 30 percent, Kalayjian said. "Now Roberts' risk of having another seizure is greater than 50 percent," she said.

Even if Roberts has epilepsy, it shouldn't affect his work, Kalayjian said. "The majority of people with epilepsy you wouldn't know they had epilepsy," she said. "About 70% of people with epilepsy do fine; they hold high level jobs, they drive. It's only 30% of people that have uncontrolled seizures that need specialized epilepsy centers to get their seizures under control." Another expert believes it's too soon to say that Roberts has epilepsy. "There are a lot of different causes that can be responsible for a seizure other than epilepsy, and some of those are very hard to detect with a regular MRI. They require more sophisticated tests," said Dr. Isabelle Germano, a professor of neurosurgery at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. Germano agreed that two seizures are, by definition, epilepsy. "But, usually in the adult population, we don't see a 14-year interval between seizures," she said. "The delayed interval might make it something else."

Whether or not he should be taking anti-seizure medication is something Roberts' doctors will have to evaluate, Kalayjian said. "His doctors should be trying to figure out if there were any triggers that caused the seizure," she said. Kalayjian noted that medications do provide some protection by raising the seizure threshold. "It would give him [Roberts] an extra level of protection, especially if he is going to be driving or doing other activities," she said. But, anti-seizure medications aren't without side effects, Kalayjian said, including dizziness and sleepiness. Seizures can last a few seconds to a few minutes. The symptoms can vary -- from convulsions and loss of consciousness to some that are not always recognized as seizures by the person experiencing them or by health care professionals: blank staring, lip smacking, or jerking movements of arms and legs.


It's all evident by now that we're gonna have an ersatz Chief of Justice ... it's crucial that Bush gets rid of him ASAP.


Exactly! If two seizures have occurred close together, there is an up to 80% likelihood that there will be a third, and an almost 100% likelihood that medication will be started. In Roberts' case, a careful look at the EEG, a read-out of his brain wave activity, could help; any abnormalities in the EEG increase the likelihood of another seizure and would argue for starting drug treatment. There are more than 20 anti-seizure medications from which Roberts and his physicians can now chose; some work to corral the hyperactivity in one area of the brain, while others prevent the electrical anomalies from occurring to begin with. All have to be taken daily, but have side effects. Drowsy, dizzy, heavily sedated as he'll be from now on, he just can't continue to be CJ.

fervid

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #116 on: August 03, 2007, 10:33:09 PM »
I hope elipepsy doesn't kill him, but lays him just low enough to linger until we have a Democratic president take office in '09, THEN he takes his well-deserved dirt nap. Roberts is an evil, corrupt, ruthless tool of corporate America and people like him will stop at nothing to grant their masters all kinds of legal goodies via the Supreme Court at the expense of average working Americans. This bastard is helping to build the new Fascist America that we all are currently living in. Wake up people! I hope they get everything coming to them, and moreso.

Roberts is a joke as a Supreme Court Justice, let alone Chief Justice. Frankly, I'd rather see that fat prick, Scalia, bite the big one, but we're not that lucky. Hey, maybe a bunch of those self-important cretins will die prematurely when the Democratic president takes office in 09. Just saying what everyone's thinking. Remember who the enemy is.

usr

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Re: Roberts v. Epilepsy
« Reply #117 on: August 04, 2007, 05:30:25 PM »

These seizures take many forms and particularly mimic epileptic seizures; they are distinguished from epilepsy only in that they are not associated with abnormal, rhythmic discharges of cortical neurons. The condition is not benign; people have broken bones, crashed automobiles, bitten off parts of their tongue, and even died from injuries sustained during non-epileptic seizures. An older term for these, pseudoseizures, should not be used. While it is correct that a non-epileptic seizure may resemble an epileptic seizure, pseudo can also connote "false, fraudulent, or pretending to be something that it is not." Non-epileptic seizures are not false, fraudulent, or produced under any sort of pretense.


So basically his seizures would have no organic cause, occuring only in the presence of others (never at sleep) with him never really hurting himself or having any attacks of urinary incontinence, faking it all the way?

g o r g e

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Re: Roberts v. Epilepsy
« Reply #118 on: August 06, 2007, 02:19:39 AM »

It's all evident by now that we're gonna have an ersatz Chief of Justice ... it's crucial that Bush gets rid of him ASAP.


Not really! There have always been people with epilepsy. Ancient people thought epileptic seizures were caused by evil spirits or demons that had invaded a person's body. Priests attempted to cure people with epilepsy by driving the demons out of them with magic and prayers. This superstition was challenged by ancient physicians like Atreya of India and later Hippocrates of Greece, both of whom recognized a seizure as a dysfunction of the brain and not a supernatural event. Nevertheless, the superstitious interpretation of epilepsy persisted for centuries. Attitudes of past societies toward epilepsy have left a legacy of stigma and damaging misconceptions which still persist today, as people with epilepsy continue to face fear, prejudice and discrimination in their everyday lives.

On the other hand, epileptic seizures have a power and symbolism which, historically, have suggested a relationship with creativity or unusual leadership abilities. Scholars have long been fascinated by evidence that prominent prophets and other holy men, political leaders, philosophers, and many who achieved greatness in the arts and sciences, suffered from epilepsy. Aristotle was apparently the first to connect epilepsy and genius. His catalogue of "great epileptics" (which included Socrates) was added to during the Renaissance. Only people from Western culture were included, however. So strong was this tradition that even in the nineteenth century, when new names of "great epileptics" were added, they were rarely chosen from among people in other parts of the world. Working from this biased historical legacy, the famous people with epilepsy that we know about are primarily white males.

Some of the most famous people in history had seizures. People with epilepsy have excelled in every area. What follows is a list of people who are responsible for changing civilization as we know it, all of whom are strongly suspected or known to have had epilepsy. It's an impressive group.

The list of famous authors and playwrights whom historians believe had epilepsy is overwhelming. It includes: Dante, the author of The Divine Comedy, who is not only Italy's pre-eminent poet but one of the towering figures of Western literature; Moliere, the master comic dramatist of the eighteenth century whose plays Tartuffe, The Imaginary Invalid and The Misanthrope are still being regularly performed today; Sir Walter Scott, one of the foremost literary figures of the romantic period whose books like Ivanhoe and Waverley remain widely read classics; the 18th century English satirist Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver's Travels; the nineteenth century American author Edgar Allan Poe; as well as three of the greatest English Romantic poets, Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Alfred Lord Tennyson.

Tennyson's "waking trances" began in adolescence, and as a young man he was diagnosed with epilepsy, which ran in the Tennyson family. British doctors of that era were reluctant to report epilepsy in respected families because they thought seizures arose from the genitals and masturbation was the cause of epilepsy! In fact, up until the nineteenth century, one of the extreme approaches to epilepsy was castration for men or clitoridectomy for women, which were thought to work by ending masturbation. Tennyson's doctor recommended European spas where the poet's epilepsy 'treatment' consisted of drinking large amounts of water, walking long distances in bad weather, and being submersed, wrapped in sheets, into cold baths.

Charles Dickens, the Victorian author of such classic books as A Christmas Carol and Oliver Twist had epilepsy, as did several of the characters in his books. The medical accuracy of Dickens's descriptions of epilepsy has amazed the doctors who read him today. Lewis Carroll, in his famous stories Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, was probably writing about his own temporal lobe seizures. The very sensation initiating Alice' adventures -- that of falling down a hole -- is a familiar one to many people with seizures. Alice often feels that her own body (or the objects around her) is shrinking or growing before her eyes, another seizure symptom. Carroll recorded his seizures, which were followed by prolonged headaches and feeling not his usual self, in his journal.

From his writings we know a lot about the epilepsy of the great Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoevsky, author of such classics as Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, who is considered by many to have brought the Western novel to the peak of its possibilities. Dostoevsky had his first seizure at age nine. After a remission which lasted up to age 25, he had seizures every few days or months, fluctuating between good and bad periods. His ecstatic auras occurring seconds before his bigger seizures were moments of transcendent happiness, which then changed to an anguished feeling of dread. He saw a blinding flash of light, then would cry out and lose consciousness for a second or two. Sometimes the epileptic discharge generalized across his brain, producing a secondary tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizure. Afterward he could not recall events and conversations that had occurred during the seizure, and he often felt depressed, guilty and irritable for days. Epilepsy is a central source of themes, personalities, and events in his books; he gave epilepsy to about 30 of his characters.

The other great nineteenth century Russian author, Count Leo Tolstoy, author of Anna Karenina and War and Peace, also had epilepsy. Modern doctors have diagnosed Gustave Flaubert, the nineteenth century French literary genius who wrote such masterpieces as Madame Bovary and A Sentimental Education, with "complex partial epilepsy of occipital-temporal origin, secondary to lesion of the left posterior hemisphere with occasional secondary generalization of seizures." Flaubert's typical seizure began with a feeling of impending doom, after which he felt his sense of self grow insecure, as if he had been transported into another dimension. He wrote that his seizures arrived as "a whirlpool of ideas and images in my poor brain, during which it seemed that my consciousness, that my me sank like a vessel in a storm." He moaned, had a rush of memories, saw fiery hallucinations, foamed at the mouth, moved his right arm automatically, fell into a trance of about ten minutes, and vomited. His father, a doctor, ordered him to take regular bleedings with leeches. Flaubert abandoned these useless treatments and resigned himself to live with his epilepsy. Flaubert gave features of these seizures (none described as epilepsy) to various characters, including the heroine of Madame Bovary, who falls into a stupor while crossing a field, and the title character in his book The Temptation of St. Anthony.

g o r g e

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #119 on: August 06, 2007, 02:21:02 AM »
Alexander the Great, King of Macedonia about 2,300 years ago and one of the greatest generals in history, had epilepsy. At the time epilepsy was known as "the sacred disease" because of the belief that those who had seizures were possessed by evil spirits or touched by the gods and should be treated by invoking mystical powers. Julius Caesar, another brilliant general and formidable politician, had seizures in the last two years of his life, possibly caused by a brain tumour. Caesar was known to have fallen convulsing into the River Tiber. By this time, epilepsy had become known as "the falling sickness" because the kind of seizures that made a person lose consciousness and fall down were the only kind then recognized as epilepsy. (Complex partial seizures were not recognized until the middle of the nineteenth century.) Human blood was widely regarded by the Romans as having curative powers, and people with epilepsy in Caesar's time were commonly seen sucking blood from fallen gladiators. Napoleon Bonaparte was probably the most brilliant military figure in history. He too is known to have had epilepsy. Another extraordinary leader of a very different time and place was Harriet Tubman, the black woman with epilepsy who led hundreds of her fellow slaves from the American South to freedom in Canada on the Underground Railroad. Tubman developed her seizure disorder through sustaining a head injury: her slave master hit her in the head with a rock.

Joan of Arc was an uneducated farmer's daughter in a remote village of medieval France who altered the course of history through her amazing military victories. From age thirteen Joan reported ecstatic moments in which she saw flashes of light coming from the side, heard voices of saints and saw visions of angels. In the opinion of the neurologist Dr. Lydia Bayne, Joan's blissful experiences "in which she felt that the secrets of the universe were about to be revealed to her" -- were seizures, and they were triggered by the ringing of church bells. Joan displayed symptoms of a temporal lobe focus epilepsy: specifically, a musicogenic form of reflex epilepsy with an ecstatic aura. Musicogenic epilepsy is generally triggered by particular music which has an emotional significance to the individual. Joan's voices and visions propelled her to become an heroic soldier in the effort to save France from English domination and led to her martyrdom in 1431, burned at the stake as a heretic when she was 19 years old. Soren Kierkegaard, the brilliant Danish philosopher and religious thinker considered to be the father of existentialism, worked hard at keeping his epilepsy secret.

In the fine arts, Vincent van Gogh is today probably the most widely known and appreciated artist with epilepsy. "The storm within" was how van Gogh described his typical seizure, which consisted of hallucinations, unprovoked feelings of anger, confusion and fear, and floods of early memories that disturbed him because they were outside his control. Van Gogh also had convulsive seizures; a hospital worker witnessed Vincent having one while painting outside. He was prescribed potassium bromide as an anticonvulsant and ordered to spend countless hours bathing in tubs at the asylum in Saint-Remy. His most troubling seizures peaked with his greatest art in the south of France, where he painted A Starry Night, the extraordinary Self-Portrait, and the famous Crows in the Wheatfields. There have been a number of prominent composers and musicians with epilepsy. George Frederick Handel, the famous baroque composer of the Messiah, is one. Niccolo Paganini is another. Paganini was an Italian violinist and composer considered by many to be the greatest violinist of all time. The eminent Russian composer of the ballets Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, Peter Tchaikovsky, is believed to have had epilepsy. Ludwig van Beethoven, one of the greatest masters of music, may have had epilepsy as well.