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Author Topic: What's good about being an attorney?  (Read 46951 times)

so basically

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Re: The more things change the more they are the same
« Reply #100 on: July 15, 2007, 07:17:13 AM »

Just to be sure I'm getting this right - he used the syringe with no needle to inject Bobby's vagina with the cocaine dissolved in water in such a quantity that it would kill her? But then why did he have to smother her with the pillow, she would die by herself..


Indeed a stupid one! I mean, why did he inject her vagina with so much cocaine when he could have easily injected the "right amount" of it into her veins?


I think the sex thing was an integral part of his killing scheme. 


If that'd be the case, what about his mother?

genesis

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Re: The more things change the more they are the same
« Reply #101 on: July 15, 2007, 05:48:02 PM »

Indeed a stupid one! I mean, why did he inject her vagina with so much cocaine when he could have easily injected the "right amount" of it into her veins?


It's not clear what he did; all we read about him, as to how he killed his victims -- if he did kill them -- are speculations by the prosecution.


Exactly! Initially the prosecution held that his motive for killing all the women was money, then when it came down to Bobby they said that although he lacked a financial motive his marriage was about to end. Roberta had already bought a house of her own, and had told friends and family that she wanted Lowell out of her life. They surmised that Lowell killed her because he couldn't stand rejection!

Edgar J.

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #102 on: July 15, 2007, 06:27:00 PM »

What's good about being an attorney?

What about the respect of the community? Attorneys are held in high regard and often chosen as leaders in society. A good attorney is a valuable friend and associate. When you pass the bar, you demonstrate an ability people look up to, and you establish yourself as part of the society's foundation. I think you'll find that your opinion as an attorney carries more weight than it does as a paralegal.

Katie T.   


A woman told her physician that her husband had developed a penchant for anal sex, and she wasn't sure that it was a good idea.
The doctor asked: "Do you enjoy it?"
She said that she loves it.
He asked: "Does it hurt?"
She said that it feels wonderful.
The doctor then told her: "Well, then there's no reason that you shouldn't have anal sex, just take care not to get pregnant."
The surprised woman asked: "You can get pregnant from anal sex?"
The doctor replied: "Sure. Where do you think lawyers come from."

xferlawstudent

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #103 on: July 16, 2007, 09:58:32 PM »
Circumstantial evidence is admissible.  Motive is not an element of crime.

Only TV law would have you believe otherwise

horus

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #104 on: July 17, 2007, 08:33:24 PM »

Another stupid murderer was Lowell "Ed" Amos, a former Detroit business man whose mother and 3 wives died under suspicious circumstances. He was convicted in 1996 of murdering his third wife, Roberta "Bobbie" Mowery Amos (there's a 2006 Lifetime Network made-for-TV movie called "Black Widower.") Lowell was a former General Motors plant manager, and came from Anderson, Indiana. In December of 1994, Lowell and wife Roberta attended a company executive party at the Atheneum Hotel in Detroit. The Amos's went to their suite at 4:30am. At 8:30am, Lowell called Norbert Crabtree, another executive from the party, and seemed to be in a panic. Crabtree and another hotel guest named Daniel Porcasi went to the room, and Lowell told them that Roberta had died in an accident. Lowell said he needed to cleanup before calling police, and he asked Crabtree to take a leather case for him, which he did. Crabtree looked inside, and found a sports coat, a syringe without a needle, and a foul-smelling washcloth inside. Amos later reclaimed the bag, and its contents disappeared.

Amos told police that he and Roberta had engaged in sexual acts involving cocaine, and claimed she was still taking the cocaine when he fell asleep. He told police that she could not snort the drug due to a sinus problem, and that instead she took it "inside" her body (in her female private part) He said that when he woke up she was dead. Bobby's body contained over 15 times the lethal dose of the drug. Autopsy revealed that there was cocaine inside Roberta's vagina, but none externally. Prosecution said that he first gave her a glass of wine with two crushed Xanax in it, then when she was passed-out, he injected her vagina with the cocaine (dissolved in water), and then smothered her with the pillow when she began to convulse. On October 24th, 1996, Lowell was convicted of premeditated murder and murder using a toxic substance, both considered separate charges of first-degree murder.


Just to be sure I'm getting this right - he used the syringe with no needle to inject Bobby's vagina with the cocaine dissolved in water in such a quantity that it would kill her? But then why did he have to smother her with the pillow, she would die by herself..


There'd be too much noise, she began to convulse pretty bad and it could take some time until she'd expire on her own.


So basically cocaine-induced convulsions are similar to epileptic seizures? Does foam come out of the mouth as the case is in grand mal?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j957yP2E5j8&mode=related&search=

fire

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #105 on: July 20, 2007, 03:30:48 AM »
horus, you are making us freak out! What the @ # ! * is that "foam out of the mouth" thing?!

blepharitis

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Re: The more things change the more they are the same
« Reply #106 on: July 28, 2007, 04:50:03 PM »

[...] Understandably Bobby had done such a things many times before for fun (a tingling sensation results).


Roberta had not done herself that sort of thing before -- she had put powder cocaine in her female private part (with lubricant so that it'd stick); she never injected herself with coke dissolved in water.

bermuda

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Re: What's good about being an attorney?
« Reply #107 on: July 30, 2007, 09:33:49 PM »
But of course, blepharitis, why would she do that?

carom

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Experts Split on Whether Chief Justice Roberts Has Epilepsy
« Reply #108 on: August 01, 2007, 05:15:48 AM »

[...] similar to epileptic seizures? Does foam come out of the mouth as the case is in grand mal?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j957yP2E5j8&mode=related&search=


TUESDAY, July 31 -- U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts walked out of a Maine hospital Tuesday morning with a clean bill of health, one day after suffering a seizure and falling on a dock near his summer home. But doctors interviewed were divided on whether the seizure -- the second one the 52-year-old jurist has suffered in 14 years -- is a sign that Roberts has epilepsy, a neurological condition that could require him to take anti-seizure medication to control the disorder. Roberts left Penobscot Bay Medical Center in Rockport shortly before noon after suffering what doctors described as an unexplained seizure near his vacation home in Port Clyde on Hupper Island. The doctors who examined him found no sign of a tumor, stroke or any other explanation for the episode. He plans to continue his summer vacation, Supreme Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg told the Associated Press. Roberts' first reported seizure occurred while playing golf in 1993.

Dr. Steven Pacia, chief of neurology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said that, given this was Roberts' second seizure, it's "likely" that he has epilepsy. "It's the most likely thing based on what we know from what's been released," he said. Pacia noted that seizures can result from an inherited susceptibility that is trigged by such factors as a lack of sleep or stress. "It sounds to me he does have idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndrome, which means that he has susceptibility to seizures under certain circumstances," he said. Dr. Laura Kalayjian, an assistant professor of neurology and co-director of the Epilepsy Center at the University of Southern California, agreed that Roberts probably has epilepsy. "The definition of epilepsy is two unprovoked seizures," Kalayjian said. The likelihood of someone having a second seizure after a first one is about 30 percent, Kalayjian said. "Now Roberts' risk of having another seizure is greater than 50 percent," she said.

Even if Roberts has epilepsy, it shouldn't affect his work, Kalayjian said. "The majority of people with epilepsy you wouldn't know they had epilepsy," she said. "About 70% of people with epilepsy do fine; they hold high level jobs, they drive. It's only 30% of people that have uncontrolled seizures that need specialized epilepsy centers to get their seizures under control." Another expert believes it's too soon to say that Roberts has epilepsy. "There are a lot of different causes that can be responsible for a seizure other than epilepsy, and some of those are very hard to detect with a regular MRI. They require more sophisticated tests," said Dr. Isabelle Germano, a professor of neurosurgery at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. Germano agreed that two seizures are, by definition, epilepsy. "But, usually in the adult population, we don't see a 14-year interval between seizures," she said. "The delayed interval might make it something else."

Whether or not he should be taking anti-seizure medication is something Roberts' doctors will have to evaluate, Kalayjian said. "His doctors should be trying to figure out if there were any triggers that caused the seizure," she said. Kalayjian noted that medications do provide some protection by raising the seizure threshold. "It would give him [Roberts] an extra level of protection, especially if he is going to be driving or doing other activities," she said. But, anti-seizure medications aren't without side effects, Kalayjian said, including dizziness and sleepiness. Seizures can last a few seconds to a few minutes. The symptoms can vary -- from convulsions and loss of consciousness to some that are not always recognized as seizures by the person experiencing them or by health care professionals: blank staring, lip smacking, or jerking movements of arms and legs.

tg

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Roberts v. Epilepsy
« Reply #109 on: August 01, 2007, 06:03:52 PM »

[...] similar to epileptic seizures? Does foam come out of the mouth as the case is in grand mal?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j957yP2E5j8&mode=related&search=


TUESDAY, July 31 -- U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts walked out of a Maine hospital Tuesday morning with a clean bill of health, one day after suffering a seizure and falling on a dock near his summer home. But doctors interviewed were divided on whether the seizure -- the second one the 52-year-old jurist has suffered in 14 years -- is a sign that Roberts has epilepsy, a neurological condition that could require him to take anti-seizure medication to control the disorder. Roberts left Penobscot Bay Medical Center in Rockport shortly before noon after suffering what doctors described as an unexplained seizure near his vacation home in Port Clyde on Hupper Island. The doctors who examined him found no sign of a tumor, stroke or any other explanation for the episode. He plans to continue his summer vacation, Supreme Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg told the Associated Press. Roberts' first reported seizure occurred while playing golf in 1993.

Dr. Steven Pacia, chief of neurology at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said that, given this was Roberts' second seizure, it's "likely" that he has epilepsy. "It's the most likely thing based on what we know from what's been released," he said. Pacia noted that seizures can result from an inherited susceptibility that is trigged by such factors as a lack of sleep or stress. "It sounds to me he does have idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndrome, which means that he has susceptibility to seizures under certain circumstances," he said. Dr. Laura Kalayjian, an assistant professor of neurology and co-director of the Epilepsy Center at the University of Southern California, agreed that Roberts probably has epilepsy. "The definition of epilepsy is two unprovoked seizures," Kalayjian said. The likelihood of someone having a second seizure after a first one is about 30 percent, Kalayjian said. "Now Roberts' risk of having another seizure is greater than 50 percent," she said.

Even if Roberts has epilepsy, it shouldn't affect his work, Kalayjian said. "The majority of people with epilepsy you wouldn't know they had epilepsy," she said. "About 70% of people with epilepsy do fine; they hold high level jobs, they drive. It's only 30% of people that have uncontrolled seizures that need specialized epilepsy centers to get their seizures under control." Another expert believes it's too soon to say that Roberts has epilepsy. "There are a lot of different causes that can be responsible for a seizure other than epilepsy, and some of those are very hard to detect with a regular MRI. They require more sophisticated tests," said Dr. Isabelle Germano, a professor of neurosurgery at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. Germano agreed that two seizures are, by definition, epilepsy. "But, usually in the adult population, we don't see a 14-year interval between seizures," she said. "The delayed interval might make it something else."

Whether or not he should be taking anti-seizure medication is something Roberts' doctors will have to evaluate, Kalayjian said. "His doctors should be trying to figure out if there were any triggers that caused the seizure," she said. Kalayjian noted that medications do provide some protection by raising the seizure threshold. "It would give him [Roberts] an extra level of protection, especially if he is going to be driving or doing other activities," she said. But, anti-seizure medications aren't without side effects, Kalayjian said, including dizziness and sleepiness. Seizures can last a few seconds to a few minutes. The symptoms can vary -- from convulsions and loss of consciousness to some that are not always recognized as seizures by the person experiencing them or by health care professionals: blank staring, lip smacking, or jerking movements of arms and legs.


It's all evident by now that we're gonna have an ersatz Chief of Justice ... it's crucial that Bush gets rid of him ASAP.