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Author Topic: Which Subject to Screw  (Read 651 times)

shao2007

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Which Subject to Screw
« on: December 06, 2005, 09:18:41 PM »
Ok so considering (probably bad choice of word after a contracts exam) that torts, civ pro, and property are all only worth 2 credits this semester and the midterm accounts for 25% of the grade, which class should get screwed in study time for Criminal Law which is 3 credit and 100% of the grade.

I am thinking civ pro because it seems the easiest and probably the exam everyone will be bunched together in the curve.


dft

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Re: Which Subject to Screw
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2005, 09:32:45 PM »
You go to Suffolk right?

1) Even though Property is only 2 credits this semester, it's a five credit course. Thus, it's worth more than Civ Pro and Torts.

2) Torts is probably the easiest subject. At least for us it is -- the essay portion is only covering intentional torts and defenses. The multiple choice section will cover intentional torts and defenses, plus some negligence. I think MC is going to be much easier (maybe not much easier, but easier) than essay though.

Ok so considering (probably bad choice of word after a contracts exam) that torts, civ pro, and property are all only worth 2 credits this semester and the midterm accounts for 25% of the grade, which class should get screwed in study time for Criminal Law which is 3 credit and 100% of the grade.

I am thinking civ pro because it seems the easiest and probably the exam everyone will be bunched together in the curve.



shao2007

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Re: Which Subject to Screw
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2005, 09:36:21 PM »
Yeah that was my same thought.

I was also talking with the teacher and a lot of people apparently neglect the class in the first semester and he likes to make them pay for neglecting his class. So I am hoping to master my knowledge of property and get on the higher end of the curve.