Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL  (Read 107193 times)

t h e r m o s

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #350 on: November 17, 2008, 01:43:12 PM »

Here it is a placenta delivery (well, it features the baby's delivery as well, but right after that part you can see the placenta being taken out)

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/yt-yd8qBexzgF4/cesarean_section_part2


My cousin gave birth to her child by means of a caesarean section -- the baby was in a podalic presentation/sitting (3-4% of all deliveries with one baby). And with the internal podalic version a lost art today, her only option was the caesarean.

pome

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 6
  • Machu Picchu
    • View Profile
Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #351 on: November 17, 2008, 07:13:40 PM »

My cousin gave birth to her child by means of a caesarean section -- the baby was in a podalic presentation/sitting (3-4% of all deliveries with one baby). And with the internal podalic version a lost art today, her only option was the caesarean.


thermos, I've heard all podalic cases have to undergo the caesarean - all, except for it, the podalic treated with version, which as you say, is something rare nowadays.

inspired minds

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #352 on: November 19, 2008, 02:37:44 PM »

Here it is a placenta delivery (well, it features the baby's delivery as well, but right after that part you can see the placenta being taken out)

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/yt-yd8qBexzgF4/cesarean_section_part2


My cousin gave birth to her child by means of a caesarean section -- the baby was in a podalic presentation/sitting (3-4% of all deliveries with one baby). And with the internal podalic version a lost art today, her only option was the caesarean.


There is a great risk of uterine rupture associated with internal podalic version -- that is the reason why it's not attempted at all. There is a strong mechanical force in taking the fetus and basically forcing it to do a summersault within the uterine cavity. These are not little things that you just kind of push gently, and it just turns. It doesn't work that way. You are using a great deal of force in turning it upside-down that does trauma to the uterine cavity and could disrupt the placenta and cause bleeding. And rarely things like amniotic fluid embolus. Those are not common things that could happen, but rarely they could. And, in fact, in Williams’ textbook of obstetrics, which is one of the most premiere, respected obstetrical textbooks for teaching medical students, it specifically says that there are very few, if any, indications to do internal podalic version other than the second twin. And in various editions he actually says it is potentially harmful. He says that it is the most common cause of traumatic uterine rupture.
And if you do separate the placenta, all the blood supply to the uterus goes to the surface of the placenta and stops there. If the placenta starts to separate, you, in fact, have an abruption of a placenta, and there would be internal hemorrhage.


good cop bad cop

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #353 on: November 19, 2008, 09:24:44 PM »

Here it is a placenta delivery (well, it features the baby's delivery as well, but right after that part you can see the placenta being taken out)

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/yt-yd8qBexzgF4/cesarean_section_part2


My cousin gave birth to her child by means of a caesarean section -- the baby was in a podalic presentation/sitting (3-4% of all deliveries with one baby). And with the internal podalic version a lost art today, her only option was the caesarean.


There is a great risk of uterine rupture associated with internal podalic version -- that is the reason why it's not attempted at all. There is a strong mechanical force in taking the fetus and basically forcing it to do a summersault within the uterine cavity. These are not little things that you just kind of push gently, and it just turns. It doesn't work that way. You are using a great deal of force in turning it upside-down that does trauma to the uterine cavity and could disrupt the placenta and cause bleeding. And rarely things like amniotic fluid embolus. Those are not common things that could happen, but rarely they could. And, in fact, in Williams’ textbook of obstetrics, which is one of the most premiere, respected obstetrical textbooks for teaching medical students, it specifically says that there are very few, if any, indications to do internal podalic version other than the second twin. And in various editions he actually says it is potentially harmful. He says that it is the most common cause of traumatic uterine rupture. And if you do separate the placenta, all the blood supply to the uterus goes to the surface of the placenta and stops there. If the placenta starts to separate, you, in fact, have an abruption of a placenta, and there would be internal hemorrhage.


Interesting, inspired minds, I have also a feeling I've read the exact same thing some place..

fromadistance

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 6
    • View Profile
Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #354 on: November 20, 2008, 08:13:07 PM »

[...] Popular culture serves up rebellion to the masses in such a way that when and if they finally act out against the state that makes them miserable their very act of rebellion finally supports that state [...]


Could you expand a bit?
Tell me lies
Tell me sweet little lies
(tell me lies, tell me, tell me lies)

cAMP

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #355 on: November 21, 2008, 03:36:55 PM »

[...] Popular culture serves up rebellion to the masses in such a way that when and if they finally act out against the state that makes them miserable their very act of rebellion finally supports that state [...]


Could you expand a bit?


I tend to believe the OP is saying that the oppressed, instead of striving for liberation, tend themselves to become oppressors, or "sub-oppressors." The very structure of their thought has been conditioned by the contradictions of the concrete, existential situation by which they were shaped. Their ideal is to be men; but for them, to be men is to be oppressors. This is their model of humanity. This phenomenon derives from the fact that the oppressed, at a certain moment of their existential experience, adopt an attitude of "adhesion" to the oppressor. Under these circumstances they cannot "consider" him sufficiently clearly to objectivize him -- to discover him "outside" themselves. This does not necessarily mean that the oppressed are unaware that they are downtrodden. But their perception of themselves as oppressed is impaired by their submersion in the reality of oppression. At this level, their perception of themselves as opposites of the oppressor does not yet signify engagement un a struggle to overcome the contradiction; the one pole aspires not to liberation, but to identification with its opposite pole.

M i r i a m

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #356 on: November 21, 2008, 04:30:10 PM »

While the practice of law is about relationships, Floyd explains, legal education devalues relationships and other emotional matters. "It is not just that we fail to teach students about relationship skills," she says. "Legal education actually diminishes or eliminates the ability to form and sustain relationships that students possess when they begin law school."


So true -- law school basically destroys your ability to relate to other people, emotionally and sexually speaking. For instance, since I started law school in August of this year I have not dated a single guy! I am aware that there are people out there who do just fine not having sex for months in a raw, but I'm just not one of them! Before starting law school I would have at least 3 sexual encounters a week; exciting, 5-hour "ordeals," during which I would push that full hunk against the wall, shove my leg in between his thighs and have him beg me to @ # ! * him - which did not happen up until he'd lick every inch of my body! Well, you get the point, I was once this hot chick who'd drive the muscle guy nuts by calling him a b i t c h of a bear so that he'd get aggressive enough - and now all I see left of that is just some "wild" phantasy to do that hot guy with the confident walk, but no real juice to it. Sometimes I think I just don't have the time, or is it maybe that I'm supposed to consider the sex thing not that worthwhile? Can somebody relate? I am particulary interested in women's opinions and experiences. I apologize if I got too graphic, but hey, that's what this forum is for, after all - we can be serious at school :) 

1L2011

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 10
    • View Profile
Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #357 on: November 21, 2008, 06:03:34 PM »
I now find myself now wandering if the Miriam in my 1L section is a closet freak. lol. I swear everytime I see her Im gonna be thinking of that visual

ca vien me rude

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
    • View Profile
Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #358 on: November 22, 2008, 02:00:43 PM »
No kidding, 1L2011 - Miriam appears to have left a "jewel" here - one that one'd dearly hold on to ;) Poor me, I was thinking Miriam was just a name for the woman who hid Moses (then a baby) by the side of a river to evade the Pharaoh's order that newborn Hebrew boys be killed (she watched as the Pharaoh's daughter discovered the infant and decided to adopt him).

teafairn

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 8
    • View Profile
Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #359 on: November 22, 2008, 02:51:45 PM »

[...] Popular culture serves up rebellion to the masses in such a way that when and if they finally act out against the state that makes them miserable their very act of rebellion finally supports that state [...]


Could you expand a bit?


I tend to believe the OP is saying that the oppressed, instead of striving for liberation, tend themselves to become oppressors, or "sub-oppressors." The very structure of their thought has been conditioned by the contradictions of the concrete, existential situation by which they were shaped. Their ideal is to be men; but for them, to be men is to be oppressors. This is their model of humanity. This phenomenon derives from the fact that the oppressed, at a certain moment of their existential experience, adopt an attitude of "adhesion" to the oppressor. Under these circumstances they cannot "consider" him sufficiently clearly to objectivize him -- to discover him "outside" themselves. This does not necessarily mean that the oppressed are unaware that they are downtrodden. But their perception of themselves as oppressed is impaired by their submersion in the reality of oppression. At this level, their perception of themselves as opposites of the oppressor does not yet signify engagement un a struggle to overcome the contradiction; the one pole aspires not to liberation, but to identification with its opposite pole.


Exactly, cAMP, the way they acted towards him shows they did not have the balls to resist the "oppressor" - while at first sight it seemed they're resisting to him, in actuality what they did just made it easier for the "oppressor" to get hold of him. Let's hope he does smth now.