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Author Topic: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL  (Read 106896 times)

What Are You Waiting For

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Re: O'Reilly smeared "very shadowy" Human Rights Watch
« Reply #320 on: October 14, 2008, 09:42:21 PM »

Oh please, nmla, when it comes to Soros you hear a hell of a lot of rumors ... and at least some of them are completely ridiculous!

Business tycoon Boris Berezovsky has said, for instance "I nearly fainted when I heard a couple of years ago that George Soros was a CIA agent." After spending $250 million for the "transformation of education of humanities and economics at the high school and university levels," Soros created the International Science Foundation for another $100 million. The Russian Federal Counterintelligence Service (FSK) accused Soros foundations in Russia of "espionage." They noted that Soros was not operating alone; he was part of a full court press that included financing from the Ford and Heritage Foundations; Harvard, Duke, and Columbia universities, and assistance from the Pentagon and U.S. intelligence services. The FSK criticized Soros' payouts to 50,000 Russian scientists, saying that Soros advanced his own interests by gaining control of thousands of Russian scientific discoveries and new technologies to collect state and commercial secrets.

In 1995, Russians were infuriated by the insinuation of State Department operative Fred Cuny into the conflict in Chechnya. Cuny's cover was disaster relief, but his history of involvement in international conflict zones of interest to the U.S., plus FBI and CIA search parties, made clear his government connections. At the time of his disappearance, Cuny was working under contract to a Soros foundation. [...]


The humanitarian Aid Worker cover is all too often indeed. I read some time ago about this HAW who's recruitment and training had been completely covert; he had revealed to no one that he was in the CIA. NOCs are sometimes placed within corporations and organizations without making the latter aware of the involvement of the NOC with the intelligence agencies. Non-official cover is contrasted with official cover, where an agent assumes a position at a seemingly benign department of their government, such as the diplomatic service. I would agree, though, that the thought that Soros himself is a CIA agent under deep, deep cover is ridiculous. His employees? Possibly. On occasion, a foreigner is targeted for recruitment; however, it is obvious that this potential agent would never knowingly work for the CIA or cooperate willingly with the US government. This individual, for example, might be vehemently anti-American. For that reason, the CIA might decide on a "false flag" recruitment approach, whereby the agent never knows that he or she is actually being recruited by the United States and the CIA. The CIA officer making the recruitment pitch poses as a representative of the false flag country or organization. It might be the case, for example, that an African official would never work for the Americans but might work for the French. An CIA officer uses a variation on false flag operations when he or she poses as a representative of an international organization, a think-tank, or a commercial firm. The agent might be induced to provide information on that basis, but would never knowingly provide information to the CIA.

currency

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Re: O'Reilly smeared "very shadowy" Human Rights Watch
« Reply #321 on: October 15, 2008, 03:20:30 PM »

[...] On occasion, a foreigner is targeted for recruitment; however, it is obvious that this potential agent would never knowingly work for the CIA or cooperate willingly with the US government. This individual, for example, might be vehemently anti-American. For that reason, the CIA might decide on a "false flag" recruitment approach, whereby the agent never knows that he or she is actually being recruited by the United States and the CIA. The CIA officer making the recruitment pitch poses as a representative of the false flag country or organization. It might be the case, for example, that an African official would never work for the Americans but might work for the French. An CIA officer uses a variation on false flag operations when he or she poses as a representative of an international organization, a think-tank, or a commercial firm. The agent might be induced to provide information on that basis, but would never knowingly provide information to the CIA.


Oftentimes these types of agents voluntarily may want to provide information (to the false flag organization). In such cases they are considered perfect volunteers and the CIA's job with volunteers is to set the table so they can accomplish whatever goals they have on their minds. As long as those goals are consistent with theirs, they are on solid ground.  The problem with these types of operations that you mention, however, is that they are unlikely to turn into stable operations. They'd be conducted in hostile environments with young and probably immature agents who will find themselves under increasingly heavy pressure. For that reason, the operation might blow and the organization being claimed to be the recipient of the information would be mentioned as the ostensible recipient of it.

Labor Omnia Vincit

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Re: The Beatles', "I Am The Walrus"
« Reply #322 on: October 15, 2008, 08:28:01 PM »

A subliminal message is communicated below the conscious level of perception. By nature, you will not be aware of receiving one. Backmasking, an audio technique in which sounds are recorded backwards onto a track that is meant to be played forwards, produces messages that sound like gibberish to the conscious mind. Gary Greenwald, a fundamentalist Christian preacher, claims that these messages can be heard subliminally, and can induce listeners towards, in the case of rock music, sex and drug use. However, this is not generally accepted as fact.


The manual for the popular sound program SoX pokes fun at subliminal messages. The description of the "reverse" option says "Included for finding satanic subliminals."

Following the 1950s subliminal message panic, many businesses have sprung up purporting to offer helpful subliminal audio tapes that supposedly improve the health of the listener. However, there is no evidence for the therapeutic effectiveness of such tapes. Subliminal messages have also been known to appear in music. In the 1990s, two young men died from self-inflicted gunshots and their families were convinced it was because of a British rock band, Judas Priest. The families claimed subliminal messages told listeners to "do it" in the song "Better by You, Better Than Me". The case was taken to court and the families sought more than US$6 million in damages. The judge, Jerry Carr Whitehead, ruled that the subliminal messages did exist in the song, but stated that the families did not produce any scientific evidence that the song persuaded the young men to kill themselves. In turn, he ruled it probably would not have been perceived without the "power of suggestion" or the young men would not have done it unless they really intended to.

Subliminal messages can affect a human's emotional state and/or behaviors. They are most effective when perceived unconsciously. The most extensive study of therapeutic effects from audiotapes was conducted to see if the self-esteem audiotapes would raise self-esteem. 237 volunteers were provided with tapes of 3 manufacturers and completed post tests after one month of use. The study showed clearly that subliminal audiotapes made to boost self-esteem did not produce effects associated with subliminal content within one month's use. The effectiveness of any subliminal message has been called into question time after time and has led many to one conclusion, namely: that the technique does not work, as Anthony R. Pratkanis, one of the researchers in the field puts it: "It appears that, despite the claims in books and newspapers and on the backs of subliminal self help tapes, subliminal-influence tactics have not been demonstrated to be effective. Of course, as with anything scientific, it may be that someday, somehow, someone will develop a subliminal technique that may work, just as someday a chemist may find a way to transmute lead to gold. I am personally not purchasing lead futures on this hope however."


Try telling that to the underground scientific community!
- "Do you do swear by Almighty God, the Searcher of all hearts, that the evidence you shall give in this issue shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth and as you shall answer to God on the last great day?"
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paymen

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Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #323 on: October 16, 2008, 10:48:55 PM »

Herbert Marcuse analyzed the integration of the industrial working class into capitalist society and new forms of capitalist stabilization and questioned the Marxian postulates of the revolutionary proletariat and inevitability of capitalist crisis. He was concerned about the decline of revolutionary potential in the West. The "advanced industrial society" has created false needs, which integrated individuals into the existing system of production and consumption via mass media, advertising, industrial management, and contemporary modes of thought. This results in a "one-dimensional" universe of thought and behavior in which aptitude and ability for critical thought and oppositional behavior wither away. Against this prevailing climate, Marcuse promotes the "great refusal" as the only adequate opposition to all-encompassing methods of control.

In contrast to orthodox Marxism, Marcuse championed non-integrated forces of minorities, outsiders, and radical intelligentsia, attempting to nourish oppositional thought and behavior through promoting radical thinking and opposition.


Global capitalism is in crisis and morphing into something new. Megabrands are losing market share as people question the values they stand for and the power they have over our lives. Now a new kind of cool is bubbling up. It's about a greener, more local, more politically charged way of living, and it starts with dumping megabrands and flowing your money into the small, indy stores and websites that are now popping up everywhere. Let us unswoosh the swoosh and create a vibrant new kind of capitalism that actually works.
We don't want to change the world; we want you to!

ycer

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Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #324 on: October 17, 2008, 05:28:10 PM »

[...]

Charles Darwin writes in "The Descent of Man" that a tribe which consisted of many members who were always ready to give aid to each-other and to sacrifice themselves for the common good, would be victorious over most other tribes; and this would be natural selection. Nietzsche reversed this scenario. Let the tribe sacrifice itself, if necessary, to preserve the existence of one great individual. It is not the quantity but the the quality of humanity that we must seek to increase. He goes on to say, "A nation is a detour of nature to arrive at six or seven great men. Yes, and then to get around them!" A struggle, not for existence (Darwin), but rather a struggle for greatness -- and with that, a struggle for power. This highly undemocratic view of humanity as a kind of "raw material" out of which a few great individuals will emerge, leads to one's political views, which are far from ordinary...

[...] 


Again, wheres, your post is more appropriately placed (situated) here


Friedrich Nietzsche used to say that if you seek something, you wish to multiply yourself tenfold, a hundredfold, that is seek followers, you have to seek zeros!


Nice contribution to the thread, usehername! Keeping the posts relevant to the subject really matters! :)

search engine

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Re: O'Reilly smeared "very shadowy" Human Rights Watch
« Reply #325 on: October 17, 2008, 06:12:03 PM »

[...] On occasion, a foreigner is targeted for recruitment; however, it is obvious that this potential agent would never knowingly work for the CIA or cooperate willingly with the US government. This individual, for example, might be vehemently anti-American. For that reason, the CIA might decide on a "false flag" recruitment approach, whereby the agent never knows that he or she is actually being recruited by the United States and the CIA. The CIA officer making the recruitment pitch poses as a representative of the false flag country or organization. It might be the case, for example, that an African official would never work for the Americans but might work for the French. An CIA officer uses a variation on false flag operations when he or she poses as a representative of an international organization, a think-tank, or a commercial firm. The agent might be induced to provide information on that basis, but would never knowingly provide information to the CIA.


I am sure there's an ethical issue here. I don't doubt that there are many of you out there who might think there's not; I was discussing the other day this other scenario with a few people and, to my astonishment, most of them thought there's nothing wrong with it: Here it is:

X serves as a diplomatic officer of the Dominican Republic in Spain. He's being transfered to the US, in New York City to serve as an officer for his country. The CIA and FBI conduct surveillance of his activities while he's in NYC and find out he frequents gay bars and has promiscuous homosexual sex with many men. They take pictures of him to serve as evidence of his homosexuality. He is approached to become an agent for the CIA, otherwise his country authorities would be provided with the above-mentioned proof of his homosexuality. In his country being overtly homosexual is a bar to employment in the diplomatic service. Is it ethical for the CIA to do such a thing? Well, all of the people I was having the discussion said "yes," except for two of us. 

specialization

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Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #326 on: October 17, 2008, 10:28:38 PM »

Herbert Marcuse analyzed the integration of the industrial working class into capitalist society and new forms of capitalist stabilization and questioned the Marxian postulates of the revolutionary proletariat and inevitability of capitalist crisis. He was concerned about the decline of revolutionary potential in the West. The "advanced industrial society" has created false needs, which integrated individuals into the existing system of production and consumption via mass media, advertising, industrial management, and contemporary modes of thought. This results in a "one-dimensional" universe of thought and behavior in which aptitude and ability for critical thought and oppositional behavior wither away. Against this prevailing climate, Marcuse promotes the "great refusal" as the only adequate opposition to all-encompassing methods of control.

In contrast to orthodox Marxism, Marcuse championed non-integrated forces of minorities, outsiders, and radical intelligentsia, attempting to nourish oppositional thought and behavior through promoting radical thinking and opposition.


Global capitalism is in crisis and morphing into something new. Megabrands are losing market share as people question the values they stand for and the power they have over our lives. Now a new kind of cool is bubbling up. It's about a greener, more local, more politically charged way of living, and it starts with dumping megabrands and flowing your money into the small, indy stores and websites that are now popping up everywhere. Let us unswoosh the swoosh and create a vibrant new kind of capitalism that actually works.


Here it is as Noam Chomsky describes the purpose of our economic system as individual material gain, and explains why a society based on this principle will destroy itself in time.

http://www.adbusters.org/blogs/blackspot/noam_chomsky_rethinking_capitalism.html

garage

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Homosexual Blackmail
« Reply #327 on: October 19, 2008, 01:34:27 PM »

I am sure there's an ethical issue here. I don't doubt that there are many of you out there who might think there's not; I was discussing the other day this other scenario with a few people and, to my astonishment, most of them thought there's nothing wrong with it: Here it is:

X serves as a diplomatic officer of the Dominican Republic in Spain. He's being transfered to the US, in New York City to serve as an officer for his country. The CIA and FBI conduct surveillance of his activities while he's in NYC and find out he frequents gay bars and has promiscuous homosexual sex with many men. They take pictures of him to serve as evidence of his homosexuality. He is approached to become an agent for the CIA, otherwise his country authorities would be provided with the above-mentioned proof of his homosexuality. In his country being overtly homosexual is a bar to employment in the diplomatic service. Is it ethical for the CIA to do such a thing? Well, all of the people I was having the discussion said "yes," except for two of us. 


It is a shame that in this day and age this is still going on! It is totally unacceptable to use homosexual blackmale to recruit him. I have a close relative who is gay. I am sensitive to the repercussions of "outing" a homosexual; he is subject to ostracism by friends, family, and society in general -- and to depression and suicidal ideation at a rate much higher than the general population. Under the best of circumstances, blackmail is repugnant. In this instance, it is punitive, with potentially serious unforeseen ramifications. While working it is easier to get caught up in the enthusiasm and to remain focused on your mission, rather than looking critically at the ethical issues involved in the work. But the latter should always be in the mind of the person making the decisions.

Topo Gigio

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Re: Homosexual Blackmail
« Reply #328 on: October 19, 2008, 10:04:35 PM »

[...]

X serves as a diplomatic officer of the Dominican Republic in Spain. He's being transfered to the US, in New York City to serve as an officer for his country. The CIA and FBI conduct surveillance of his activities while he's in NYC and find out he frequents gay bars and has promiscuous homosexual sex with many men. They take pictures of him to serve as evidence of his homosexuality. He is approached to become an agent for the CIA, otherwise his country authorities would be provided with the above-mentioned proof of his homosexuality. In his country being overtly homosexual is a bar to employment in the diplomatic service. Is it ethical for the CIA to do such a thing? Well, all of the people I was having the discussion said "yes," except for two of us.
 

X's homosexuality should have no bearing whatsoever on the decision to recruit him. Blackmail, regardless of what he sought to hide, would be morally unacceptable because it would objectify him in such a way that he would become wholly dehumanized and transformed into a mere instrument and means for the CIA and FBI. The only wage the CIA and FBI would pay X would be the promise to keep his secret. He would be faced with the situation of losing universal freedom in order to sustain his right to privacy. Privacy is never privacy when it is under the duress of extortion. This kind of extortion is tantamount to slavery and slavery is always morally unacceptable.

beyoncé

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Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #329 on: October 20, 2008, 08:54:00 PM »

In an amazing scientific discovery, we have now come to know that antihomicidal defenses start early in life -- even before we are born, when we still inhabit the presumably cozy environment of our mother's womb. As Harvard biologist David Haig has discovered, even the womb presents its own dangers; a chief one of those is what is known as spontaneous abortions, many of which happen before a woman even knows she is pregnant. Indeed, we now know that many women who experience late periods and worry that they are pregnant, only to be relieved later when their periods begin again, have actually experienced spontaneous abortion of the growing fetus. According to Haig's findings, these often undetected miscarriages occur when the mother's body has sensed that the fetus is in poor health or possesses genetic abnormalities.

Remarkably, Haig also discovered that a defense mechanism has evolved to outwit the mother's body and protect the fetus. This is the fetal production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which is a hormone the fetus secretes into the mother's bloodstream. The female body appears to "interpret" high levels of hCG as a sign that a fetus is healthy and viable, and so does not spontaneously abort. Even the womb is a hostile environment where one's own interests must be protected at the cost of another's. Even in that most sacred place we are potential murder victims.




For the sake of truth, clog, hCG is produced by the placenta, not the fetus itself. Shortly after a woman's egg is fertilized by her male partner's sperm and is implanted in the lining or the womb (uterus), a placenta begins to form. This organ will help nourish the developing new life. The placenta produces hCG, whose presence, along with other hormones, helps maintain the early stages of pregnancy. After implantation, the level of detectable hCG rises very rapidly, approximately doubling in quantity every two days until a peak is reached between the weeks 6 and 8. Over the next 10 or more weeks, the quantity of hCG slowly decreases. After this point, a much lower level is sustained for the duration of the pregnancy.



Here it is a placenta delivery (well, it features the baby's delivery as well, but right after that part you can see the placenta being taken out)

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/yt-yd8qBexzgF4/cesarean_section_part2/
Today I dialed a wrong number... The other person said, "Hello?" and I said, "Hello, could I speak to Joey?"... They said, "Uh... I don't think so ... he's only 2 months old." I said, "I'll wait."