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Author Topic: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL  (Read 107204 times)

Julie Fern

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Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #580 on: December 11, 2011, 08:41:57 PM »
No Julie, my letter was in ballet and goatfucking.  I was the best, almost went national.  But was straight all the way.

julie guessing you put on resume.

fortook

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Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #581 on: December 11, 2011, 11:07:54 PM »
Of course. Wouldn't you?
"Thank you for inviting me, Mrs. Palin." "Thank you for cutting your mullet, Levi."

Julie Fern

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Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #582 on: December 12, 2011, 03:45:45 PM »
julie already have plenty baggage.

scores

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Re: Nietzsche's 'Masters'
« Reply #583 on: December 12, 2011, 06:42:06 PM »

[...] brave, noble warriors, who have these sadomasochistic and pederastic propensities, and as to whether today's ruling class in the Western world is really that kind or not..


Are you people kidding me when you talk about gay and the like - they are discussing sadomasochistic, pederastic warriors and the like, while you take this for just some gay * & ^ % of thing!

fortook

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Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #584 on: December 12, 2011, 10:49:46 PM »
Ahh the ring of absolution- the Band  still around slashing people up.
"Thank you for inviting me, Mrs. Palin." "Thank you for cutting your mullet, Levi."

vag monologues

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There ain't heros, only b i t c h e s!
« Reply #585 on: December 14, 2011, 05:26:08 PM »

Since life is meaningless and absurd we should find our own values we will live by. One value system suggested by social psychologists, broadly called Terror Management Theory, states that all human meaning is derived out of a fundamental fear of death, whereby values are selected when they allow us to escape the mental reminder of death. Terror management theory (TMT) looks at what researchers claim to be the implicit emotional reactions of people when confronted with the psychological terror of knowing we will eventually die (some believe that awareness of mortality is a trait that is unique to humans). The theory was first developed in the late 1980s by Skidmore College psychology professor Sheldon Solomon, University of Arizona psychology professor Jeff Greenberg, and Colorado University at Colorado Springs psychology professor Tom Pyszczynski, who were graduate students at the University of Kansas at the time. The trio were inspired by the theories of Ernest Becker (The Denial of Death, 1973), Otto Rank and Freud, on how potent reminders of one's own ultimate death often provoke a belief in some form of mystical transcendence (heaven, reincarnation, spiritualism, etc.) Terror management theory attempts to provide a rationale for the motivational catalysts of human behavior when life is threatened.

Terror Management Theory (TMT), in social psychology, states that human behavior is mostly motivated by the fear of mortality. The theory purports to help explain human activity both at the individual and societal level. It is derived from anthropologist Ernest Becker's 1973 Pulitzer Prize-winning work of non-fiction "The Denial of Death," in which Becker argues all human action is taken to ignore or avoid the inevitability of death. The terror of absolute annihilation creates such a profound—albeit subconscious—anxiety in people (called cognitive dissonance) that they spend their lives attempting to make sense of it. On large scales, societies build symbols: laws, religious meaning systems, cultures, and belief systems to explain the significance of life, define what makes certain characteristics, skills, and talents extraordinary, reward others whom they find exemplify certain attributes, and punish or kill others who do not adhere to their cultural worldview. On an individual level, how well someone adheres to a cultural worldview is the same concept as self-esteem; people measure their own worth based on how well they live up to their culture's expectations.

Becker in his book literally says,


Quote

"I'm not an an animal, but an hero!"


According to TMT theorists, symbols that create cultural worldviews are fiercely protected as representations of actual life. The Terror Management Theory posits that when people are reminded of their own deaths, they more readily enforce these symbols, often leading to punitive actions, violence, and war. Experiments have been performed to lend evidence to TMT, primarily carried out by Sheldon Solomon, Tom Pyszczynski, and Jeff Greenberg, seeking to provide proof that mortality salience, or the awareness of one's own death, affects the decision-making of individuals and groups of people.

The theory builds from the assumption that the capability of self-reflection and the consciousness of one's own mortality can be regarded as a continuous source for existential anguish. This "irresolvable paradox" is created from the desire to preserve life and the realization of that impossibility (because life is finite). Humans are aware of the inevitability of their own death. Culture diminishes this psychological terror by providing meaning, organization and continuity to people's lives. Compliance with cultural values enhances one's feeling of security and self-esteem, provided that the individual is capable of living in accordance with whatever particular cultural standards apply to him or her. The belief in the rightness of the cultural values and standards creates the conviction necessary to live a reasonable and meaningful life. This cultural worldview provides a base of making sense of the world as stable and orderly, a place where one rests their hopes on symbolic immortality (e.g., fame, having children, legacies of wealth or fortune) or literal immortality (e.g., the promise of a life in an afterworld). Our cultural world view is a "symbolic protector" between the reality of life and inevitability of death. Because of this men and women strive to have their cultural worldview confirmed by others, thereby receiving the community's esteem. However, when one's worldview is threatened by the world view of another, it often results in one's self-respect being endangered as well. In such a situation people not only endeavor to deny or devalue the importance of others' world views, but try to controvert the ideas and opinions of others which may, as a consequence, escalate into a conflict (ie. religious holy wars). As a result, mortality salience increases stereotypical thinking and intergroup bias between groups.


[...]

Freud, for one, has been portrayed as a relentless materialist whose death-instinct theory has burdened us with a most unattractive load of pessimism, reductionism, past-driven determinism, and dualism. He may be seen as one of the last giants in a dying tradition. Ernst Becker (1973) is perhaps his severest critic. Becker sees Freud as a man who was haunted by death anxiety all his life. According to Becker, Thanatos represents a not-very-clever effort to conceal Freud's own death anxiety. Essentially, Thanatos is said to be Freud's way of avoiding confrontation with the "terror of death."


Looks like you've not pasted the whole thing in here -

Quote

TMT attempts to link human drives together under the rubric of the fear of death. According to Solomon, Greenberg, and Pyszczynski, "All anxiety is derived from self-preservation instincts." TMT further argues that fear of death is the central force in evolution, motivating genetic self-preservation instincts in species and promoting natural selection. Emotion is both motivational and evolutionary. However, evolutionary psychologists have criticized TMT by arguing that because fear is an adaptive fitness response designed by natural selection to respond to specific fitness challenges, inhibiting anxiety would have been maladaptive in our ancestral past and ... it is therefore implausible that psychological processes for inhibiting anxiety ... would be active today."

On the other hand, Coalitional Psychology (CP) is presented as another alternative to TMT, which proposes that there is an evolutionary tendency to seek safety in groups (coalitions) as a reaction to adaptive threats. People already a part of coalitional groups seek to protect their membership by exhibiting their value to the group. In other words, belief systems, cosmologies, values, rituals, and various other trappings of culture exist simply to facilitate group cohesiveness; thus any meaning, sense of personal value, or hope of death transcendence such beliefs may provide is purely epiphenomenal to their coalition-binding function.


Also, while Becker accuses Freud for "being haunted with the death instinct," the ironic thing is that it's him who replaces the Freudian preoccupation with sexuality with the fear of death as the primary motivation in human behavior. (We all know that Freud was very specific when talking about sexuality, and very vague when talking about thanatos).


But I can understand why TMT would make out of the individual the kind of p u s s y it makes out of him - in Western culture we are trained to experience ourselves as separate from each-other, alone, assuming as self evident that other individuals experience the same. It must be, then, that the driving force behind all human behavior is the desire to overcome this sense of aloneness, to feel part of a greater whole, to be liked and accepted by other human beings.


b e l i n d a

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Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #586 on: December 14, 2011, 09:46:54 PM »

A similar kind of "critique" can actually be found in the work of some of today's scholars - yanno, civil society and stuff like that - looking at the civil society as key to defend against the State and the market, or even as an actual means to subvert authoritarian regimes, for that matter. As things are, unfortunately, today's "civil society" is nothing but a complement (or should I say, compliment?) to the State, when, in fact, the State does not precede such society.


Hahaha, Violet Bear, even the term "civil" (society) in itself is ironic, don't ya think?!
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author

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Re: INSTITUTIONAL DENIAL ABOUT THE DARK SIDE OF LAW SCHOOL
« Reply #587 on: December 19, 2011, 01:11:58 AM »

A similar kind of "critique" can actually be found in the work of some of today's scholars - yanno, civil society and stuff like that - looking at the civil society as key to defend against the State and the market, or even as an actual means to subvert authoritarian regimes, for that matter. As things are, unfortunately, today's "civil society" is nothing but a complement (or should I say, compliment?) to the State, when, in fact, the State does not precede such society.


Hahaha, Violet Bear, even the term "civil" (society) in itself is ironic, don't ya think?!


It's still, "civil" Belinda - I mean it's not a military junta type of thing - like it was once in Haiti or Burma!

mauchly

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The Negro-Ape Metaphor - Subliminal Priming
« Reply #588 on: December 20, 2011, 05:11:13 AM »

The Lyrics:

Quote
I am he as you are he as you are me and we are all together.
See how they run like pigs from a gun, see how they fly.
I'm crying.

Now, a lot of songs by The Beatles have these "subliminal" messages. Here it is another weird one from Beatles:

The Beatles', "Revolution 9"

The Lyrics:

Quote
Right! Right!

When you play the track backwards, it sounds like someone screaming, "Get me out! Get me out!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PG0wksBzKSc


A subliminal message is communicated below the conscious level of perception. By nature, you will not be aware of receiving one. Backmasking, an audio technique in which sounds are recorded backwards onto a track that is meant to be played forwards, produces messages that sound like gibberish to the conscious mind. Gary Greenwald, a fundamentalist Christian preacher, claims that these messages can be heard subliminally, and can induce listeners towards, in the case of rock music, sex and drug use. However, this is not generally accepted as fact.

Following the 1950s subliminal message panic, many businesses have sprung up purporting to offer helpful subliminal audio tapes that supposedly improve the health of the listener. However, there is no evidence for the therapeutic effectiveness of such tapes.

Subliminal messages have also been known to appear in music. In the 1990s, two young men died from self-inflicted gunshots and their families were convinced it was because of a British rock band, Judas Priest. The families claimed subliminal messages told listeners to "do it" in the song "Better by You, Better Than Me". The case was taken to court and the families sought more than US$6 million in damages. The judge, Jerry Carr Whitehead, ruled that the subliminal messages did exist in the song, but stated that the families did not produce any scientific evidence that the song persuaded the young men to kill themselves. In turn, he ruled it probably would not have been perceived without the "power of suggestion" or the young men would not have done it unless they really intended to.

Subliminal messages can affect a human's emotional state and/or behaviors. They are most effective when perceived unconsciously. The most extensive study of therapeutic effects from audiotapes was conducted to see if the self-esteem audiotapes would raise self-esteem. 237 volunteers were provided with tapes of 3 manufacturers and completed post tests after one month of use. The study showed clearly that subliminal audiotapes made to boost self-esteem did not produce effects associated with subliminal content within one month's use. The effectiveness of any subliminal message has been called into question time after time and has led many to one conclusion, namely: that the technique does not work, as Anthony R. Pratkanis, one of the researchers in the field puts it: "It appears that, despite the claims in books and newspapers and on the backs of subliminal self help tapes, subliminal-influence tactics have not been demonstrated to be effective. Of course, as with anything scientific, it may be that someday, somehow, someone will develop a subliminal technique that may work, just as someday a chemist may find a way to transmute lead to gold. I am personally not purchasing lead futures on this hope however."


I am sure researchers as Pratkanis and several other scientists rightfully take issue with subliminals, as we all would expect them to! Yet, my brother-in-law who's a Ph.D. psych student, tells me about several scientific studies they take at face value making use of such techniques. One of the most intriguing ones is a research paper from Goff at al., 2008 that I had a chance to read.

Phillip Atiba Goff maintains that although historical representations explicitly depicting Blacks as apelike have largely disappeared in the U.S., a mental association between Blacks and apes remains. In the paper, authors demonstrate that U.S. citizens implicitly associate Blacks and apes.

In a series of lab studies, the authors reveal how this association influences study participants' basic cognitive processes and significantly alters their judgments in criminal justice contexts. Specifically, this Black-ape association alters visual perception and attention, and it increases endorsement of violence against Black suspects.

U.S. citizens study participants, white and non-white, subliminally primed with black faces were faster at identifying degraded ape images compared to those primed with white faces and non-face images. Moreover, participants took longer to identify the ape image if primed with a white face, compared to non-face and black face images.

(For those of you not familiar with the concept of 'priming' - it refers to the process of making someone focus on a certain concept; for instance, if you are being asked what your race or sex is before taking an SAT test, it's considered you are being 'primed' with race/sex and that you will hopefully be self-conscious of your status as a black/white person or man/woman during the whole time you take the test - as you are also considered to have been 'primed' with gender cues if, for instance, you are a woman and take a test in a room with 5 males. "Subliminal" priming takes this to a whole new level, entailing sending the stimuli "below the awareness threshold" and directly to your unconscious mind, as opposed to the "above threshold" sensory stimuli, available for an individual's conscious perception).

When these participants were primed with ape they were more likely to justify police violence towards black people. The authors also show that news articles written about Blacks who are convicted of capital crimes are more likely to contain ape-relevant language than news articles written about white convicts. Moreover, the convicts that are implicitly portrayed as more ape-like in these articles are more likely to be executed by the state than those who are not.

Now that's science for y'all, fellas!

pretamanger

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Re: Nietzsche's 'Masters'
« Reply #589 on: December 21, 2011, 01:47:22 AM »


[...]

While Nietzsche's emphasis on free will might seem to rescue humanity from the degrading philosophies of environmental or biological determinism, it does nothing of the sort. It only elevates a small elite of humanity, whom Nietzsche called the Superman, or more literally, Overman. Nietzsche's freedom was freedom only for these Supermen, the creative geniuses (like himself) who would rise above the hoi polloi. He had nothing but disdain for the masses, whom he thought incapable of exercising true freedom. What Nietzsche contemptuously called the herd instinct of the masses fitted them for nothing other than submission to the domination of the Superman.

Despite its stress on freedom, then, Nietzsche's philosophy is really a philosophy that aims at enslavement. Power ultimately decides not only who rules politically, but also what counts as truth. Nietzsche rejected any form of fixed truth or morality, thus undermining the very notion of humanity and human rights. [...]



The Darwinian idea of "the survival of the fittest" is simply a struggle for existence -- for life rather than death. The exceptional life-forms may well be poorly adapted to survive. The history of evolving forms shows that happy accidents are eleminated, the more highly evolved types lead nowhere; it is the average and below types which invariably ascend. This simple biological progression is no progression at all -- it leads to the victory of the herd.

Charles Darwin writes in "The Descent of Man" that a tribe which consisted of many members who were always ready to give aid to each-other and to sacrifice themselves for the common good, would be victorious over most other tribes; and this would be natural selection. Nietzsche reversed this scenario. Let the tribe sacrifice itself, if necessary, to preserve the existence of one great individual. It is not the quantity but the the quality of humanity that we must seek to increase. He goes on to say, "A nation is a detour of nature to arrive at six or seven great men. Yes, and then to get around them!" A struggle, not for existence (Darwin), but rather a struggle for greatness -- and with that, a struggle for power. This highly undemocratic view of humanity as a kind of "raw material" out of which a few great individuals will emerge, leads to one's political views, which are far from ordinary...

Now, if my own will happens to coincide with the will of the group, this is just a happy accident, which raises the so-called paradox of democracy. In a democracy, I am committed to two principles: 1. the will of the majority (the State); 2. My own will. Unfortunately, there is no necessary reason why these two principles should ever coincide! Clearly, the individual will is forfeit to the demands of the government -- a kind of political darwinism. The herd triumphs once again, this time under the banner of the state. The better the State is organized, the duller humanity will be. As little State as possible!




Nietzsche's Masters: he says that every 'higher' or noble culture began with barbarians, 'predatory' humans who conquered either the 'more well-behaved, peaceable' ones or 'crumbling cultures'. They establish an 'aristocratic' class, based in ideas of a natural hierarchy between people, who dominated by their stronger will to power. This class is the origin of ideas of 'nobility'. The aristocratic class – Nietzsche has in mind the aristocratic societies of ancient Rome and Greece – faced challenging conditions, wars with other societies, the threat of revolt by those oppressed. These conditions made for strong, unified people with a harsh and intolerant set of values. Such a class has no qualms about using 'lower' human beings for its own ends; this is itself understood as 'justice' and 'natural'. The whole of society is understood to exist for their sake, for the sake of what is great and noble.


So basically you are reiterating one more time what 'schoo' says...