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Author Topic: My prediction: Online law schools will EVENTUALLY be recognized  (Read 18441 times)

fuckdls

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Re: My prediction: Online law schools will EVENTUALLY be recognized
« Reply #30 on: March 23, 2006, 10:57:33 AM »
the only people that would go to a dl are old mid life crisis men, come on now this aloha dude is claiming he had a high lsat score then why not go to a real law school?  There are almost 200 aba law schools, many which take way too dumb of students, then the ones who cant get in a tier 4 go online.  Yes California allows you to take the bar, but they think ur dumb (rightly so) and so they make you take baby bar (which most of you fail) and then regular bar (which pretty much the rest of u fail) look at the numbers if u dont believe me, like a previous poster said u are doing an expensive paralegal program!

mklee53

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Re: My prediction: Online law schools will EVENTUALLY be recognized
« Reply #31 on: March 23, 2006, 04:12:23 PM »
At age 52 Yale does not want me.  Eventhough  I have a 3.4 and 170 on the LSAT.  So smart ass, what is your next suggestion?  Take on $100,000 debt?  Pompous ass.

majorporcupine

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Re: My prediction: Online law schools will EVENTUALLY be recognized
« Reply #32 on: March 23, 2006, 06:04:12 PM »
At age 52 Yale does not want me.  Eventhough  I have a 3.4 and 170 on the LSAT.  So smart ass, what is your next suggestion?  Take on $100,000 debt?  Pompous ass.

In that case, don't go to law school.  Take up law as a hobby, go serve on juries, watch your Law & Order re-runs.  But you have nothing valuable to add to the legal profession.  I mean, at your age, real lawyers are marketing themselves for SCOTUS appointments already.

Of course, with a 3.4/170, I'm not sure if Yale would take you at 22 either.

But hey, if you want a nice certificate that says J.D., I can print one up and mail it to you for $25.  For an extra $5, I'll even sign my name and stamp it with my official "Certified by Yale Law School Student" stamp.  The ink comes in pretty colors.

jacy85

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Re: My prediction: Online law schools will EVENTUALLY be recognized
« Reply #33 on: March 23, 2006, 06:07:44 PM »
At age 52 Yale does not want me.  Eventhough  I have a 3.4 and 170 on the LSAT.  So smart ass, what is your next suggestion?  Take on $100,000 debt?  Pompous ass.

Yale doesn't care that you're 52.  Yale cares that you only have a 3.4 and a 170.  Why would they want you when they have their choice of candidates with 3.8+ gpas and 175+ lsat scores?

majorporcupine

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Re: My prediction: Online law schools will EVENTUALLY be recognized
« Reply #34 on: March 23, 2006, 06:10:58 PM »
At age 52 Yale does not want me.  Eventhough  I have a 3.4 and 170 on the LSAT.  So smart ass, what is your next suggestion?  Take on $100,000 debt?  Pompous ass.

Yale doesn't care that you're 52.  Yale cares that you only have a 3.4 and a 170.  Why would they want you when they have their choice of candidates with 3.8+ gpas and 175+ lsat scores?

Well, at that age, two questions are crucial:

1) What have you achieved?

2) Why the change now?

Satisfactory answers to both of these could overcome a mediocre GPA/LSAT.  Not a 3.4/170, mind you; more like a 3.7/175.  But I suspect mklee53 wouldn't be able to answer (1) and (2) even with the 3.7/175, so it's a moot point.

RootBrewskies

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Re: My prediction: Online law schools will EVENTUALLY be recognized
« Reply #35 on: March 27, 2006, 02:22:33 PM »
ive taken online classes.  they are utterly worthless. 

technology is a great tool for the classroom.  it is not able to replace a classroom. 



there is a reason you have to go to law school.  if the ABA approves online law schools it might as well just eliminate the requirement to go to law school.  you could just self study and then take the bar, because thats what online law schools are essentially doing. 


whats next after online law schools?  i can hear the radio and tv adds already.  "send in $59.99 for your four week law school audio tape.  with these tapes you'll be ready to pass the bar in no time.  in the time it takes you to commute to work each month, just pop in the tape and you'll be ready for the bar in no time."



there is a reason that online universities dont get respect in the job market and to put law schools online will only do the same thing.


im not saying that the non-ABA schools in cali are bad.  if thats what people want to do then go for it, but i really cant ever see myself saying that online law schools are a good idea. 

maybe some day when we have super super fast internet connections and could have seamless streaming video we could have some type of online law class situation but even that wouldnt be effective.

at some point we have to understand that technology is a good tool for us but not the answer to everything.  at some point we have to face the fact that a computer cant teach us everything.

mklee53

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Re: My prediction: Online law schools will EVENTUALLY be recognized
« Reply #36 on: April 06, 2006, 11:42:54 AM »
At age 52 Yale does not want me.  Eventhough  I have a 3.4 and 170 on the LSAT.  So smart ass, what is your next suggestion?  Take on $100,000 debt?  Pompous ass.

Yale doesn't care that you're 52.  Yale cares that you only have a 3.4 and a 170.  Why would they want you when they have their choice of candidates with 3.8+ gpas and 175+ lsat scores?

Well, at that age, two questions are crucial:

1) What have you achieved?

2) Why the change now?

Satisfactory answers to both of these could overcome a mediocre GPA/LSAT.  Not a 3.4/170, mind you; more like a 3.7/175.  But I suspect mklee53 wouldn't be able to answer (1) and (2) even with the 3.7/175, so it's a moot point.

1) I have achieved a career in criminal justice, i.e., thirty years of working with judges, parole commission, and prosecutors to make sure the "bad guys" are properly identified and incarcerated and if paroled, making sure they are held accountable for their transgressions.

2) The change is because after thirty years and retiring from that position, I have the time to devote myself to law study to become a lawyer, something I did not have when I was working fifty to sixty hours per week.

Are these answers sufficient or do you need me to draw you cartoons so you can understand?

All this said, I do not believe that a DL law degree competes with your ABA degrees, and yes they are probably a glorified paralegal degree.  No, I am not studying law for a hobby as I have already secured a clerkship from a judge for whom I worked.  No, I do not want to obtain a job in a large law firm, but I do have a respect for all of you that are devoting time, money, and effort into becoming lawyers.  If I am fortunate to obtain my degree in law, pass the bar, which is difficult enough even for the ABA graduate, it will be with the same effort and work that you have done.  Yes my options are limited, but I could not afford an ABA school.  Yes all of your degrees will be much more impressive than mine.  Some of us are doing the best we can with the funds available to us.  Just to let you know, none of my undergraduate degrees, yes degrees, nor my graduate degrees, yes plural there too, were from on line schools.  All major and highly rated universities.

Wild Jack Maverick

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Re: My prediction: Online law schools will EVENTUALLY be recognized
« Reply #37 on: April 06, 2006, 12:42:09 PM »
I don't see the logic of the argument. The brick and mortar law students seem very adament that students should attend their traditional schools or not at all, then in the next breath say that the field of law is really overcrowed and too competitive...better yet..don't bother.

Some of those brick and mortar law school grads who can't find decent jobs are likely to start their own online law schools for the money to pay their student loans. Unfortunately, if while in law school the students are busy dissing the online schools, it might be alittle difficult to later find any students willing to study online courses.
"I enjoy being in school. I've learned so much already, with taking economics and law, and I have marketing and statistics coming up next."

DanteHicks

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Re: My prediction: Online law schools will EVENTUALLY be recognized
« Reply #38 on: April 06, 2006, 02:35:21 PM »
What about brick n mortar non-ABA schools such as Nashville School of Law (NSL)?

If the argument is that the online classrooms cannot compete with the brick n mortar classrooms, then surely no one could object to a law school such as NSL.

I agree that the bar passage rates say something for DL and/or other types of non-ABA law schools, but what about the students who DO pass the bar and go on to become great lawyers, judges, politicians, etc?  Does that not count for anything?

Lastly, a school like NSL teaches pretty much the same core law courses that the ABA schools offer.  Is the law different in those courses?

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elemnopee

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Re: My prediction: Online law schools will EVENTUALLY be recognized
« Reply #39 on: April 06, 2006, 09:50:25 PM »
I don't see the logic of the argument. The brick and mortar law students seem very adament that students should attend their traditional schools or not at all, then in the next breath say that the field of law is really overcrowed and too competitive...better yet..don't bother.

Some of those brick and mortar law school grads who can't find decent jobs are likely to start their own online law schools for the money to pay their student loans. Unfortunately, if while in law school the students are busy dissing the online schools, it might be alittle difficult to later find any students willing to study online courses.

I don't see the logic in this post, maybe my LSAT is too high