Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Talismans and Spells For Law Students  (Read 15072 times)

portia the beautiful

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
    • View Profile
Re: Talismans and Spells For Law Students
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2005, 07:30:25 PM »
Thanks cindy for the great contribution to this thread!

primadonna greta garbo

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Talismans and Spells For Law Students
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2005, 01:24:01 AM »
Indeed Portia!

I mean I'm paying to this thread no more no less attention than to the other ones and the subject matter of my exams.

rezipsa

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 153
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Talismans and Spells For Law Students
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2005, 12:13:37 PM »
Objection - irrelevant.

denna

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
:)
« Reply #13 on: December 10, 2005, 08:59:43 PM »

haulplnd

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Palmistry
« Reply #14 on: December 17, 2005, 06:20:39 AM »
There is a long tradition of human beings trying to unravel the future through virtually every imaginable means. And in almost every form of divination, there is a grain of common sense.



Tarot can be said to invoke Jungian archetypes to characterize the elements of our perception of the universe. The i-Ching is in many respects a reasonable model of processes in physical systems. Seeing the future in dreams is surprisingly feasible in a world where Quantum Physics applies. You can even construction a decent-sounding (albeit intellectually flimsy) rationalization for the general concept of Astrology under the auspices of chaos theory.

Palmistry, alas, is the red-headed stepchild of divination systems. There's just no good reason to think it might work no matter how loosely you apply the strictures of "science." What it lacks in credibility, palmistry makes up for in drama. There's nothing quite like reading palms for a moment of drama especially if you happen to be a mysterious gypsy with a husky Marlene Dietrich-style voice. The theory itself is pretty basic. The lines on your hands are said to describe important elements of your life, ranging from your success in love to your allotted span of years. It's a great romantic notion.

Now, in vaguest principle, some of this information is in fact encoded in your body somewhere, whether it be your DNA, your neural pathways or simply the stiffness of your arteries. However, you'd be hard-pressed to find anyone who can explain why these characteristics would manifest themselves as creases on your hand, or why any given person should be particularly qualified to judge the content of those creases. Most estimates of the origins of palmistry run back about 3,000 years, which is probably a low estimate since people had hands for a long time before that. It's known to have been practiced in China, Egypt and India, at the very least.

There are various lines on the hand which supposedly chart to the days of our lives (much like sands through an hourglass). The most famous of these (and the most frequently consulted by 9-year-olds first discovering the exciting world of alternate spiritualities) are the life line (life expectancy), heart line (success in love, or lack thereof) and a few hatch marks down the side of the hand which are supposed to indicate how many children one may expect.

If the practice of palmistry pretty much stopped there, it would no doubt rest in the same general category as the scientific pursuit of how to break your mother's back by stepping on sidewalk cracks (an area surprisingly neglected by most major university programs). But there's sooooooo much more. And what's really fascinating is just how pedantic and tedious most of it is. Virtually every mark you can find on your hand is charted to some portent of meaning by one person or another. It's tempting to throw the "New Age" slur over the whole mess of practitioners and move on, but the practice of palmistry differs from the mass of New Age practices in that it never really went out of style so that it could have a proper renaissance. Like tuberculosis, it's just always been there. The Catholic Church banned palmistry during the Middle Ages, but at the same time embraced it as a method of finding witches to burn. Through the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, the practice was commonly accepted, and even studied in universities as a form of Physiognomy.

Persisting into the 20th century with little dampening of enthusiasm, the adherents of palmistry did at least pick up some pointers from the birth of the New Age movement in the 1960s. Those wishing to learn more about reading palms may now treat themselves to thousands on thousands of pages of hifalutin verbiage which purports to explain how it could possibly be that these tiny lines on your hand could portray your life in any reasonable way. Centuries ago, the sages of India established a system of knowledge stemming from the Vedas, the earliest sacred Hindu writings. They studied the hands as a means to unveil and understand the self and relationships with others. They saw that the unique patterns of lines and signs in the hand come into being as a direct result of the way we think. Just as a pebble thrown into the water creates ripples, so our thoughts create similar effects.

The first rule of the New Age: When it doubt, it comes from the Vedas. Viewed by many as an extremely useful tool, organizations such as Scotland Yard and the French police currently use palmistry and the study of hands for detecting criminals. The above apparently refers to the practice of fingerprinting, which is hardly the same as palmistry. But try telling these schmucks. And how about this one? Hand reading gives us instant, easy access to the person within, so that we no longer have to take the people in our relationships at face value, leaving us wondering if we really know them at all. The hands give us access to the inner person, allowing us to see strengths and weaknesses, behaviour patterns, things that have affected us in the past, how we feel right now, and what we might be doing or feeling in the future. We can see ourselves as we really are, allowing us to really step back and see ourselves as others see us! No hiding! No pretending! The hands do not lie!

Yes, you can't trust anyone, the @ # ! * i n g bastards! Thank god you can surreptitiously read their palms, pry into the deepest corners of their psyches, learn their weaknesses and secrets, then use this knowledge to keep them firmly enslaved to your almighty will! Now THAT'S good thinking! Even more telling are the writings attempting to legitimize palmistry with records of its historical appeal and current popularity. One widely reprinted "history of palmistry" demonstrates not only that palm readers can't spell or perform simple grammatical functions, but that they aren't even bright enough to spellcheck material before lifting it from someone else's site on the Internet:

Quote
"The practise (sic) of palmistry was unfortunitly (sic) forced underground by the catholic (sic) church who (sic) branded it devil worshiping (sic). ... Proffesional (sic) palmists can be found reading palms in every country in the world. Pick up almost any copy of a womens (sic) magazine and there is some information on palmistry." (A Lexis-Nexis search of magazines published over the last three years did not seem to bear this latter claim out.)


In a world where beliefs such as Scientology, Homeopathy and even Mormonism are comfortably ensconced within the acceptable range of beliefs held by people outside of institutional settings, it has to tell you something when a belief like palmistry (or physiognomy in general) finds its niche catering to the lowest common denominator. If something is too flaky for even Tom Cruise, Kirstie Alley or Priscilla Presley to publicly espouse it, it's got to be pretty d a m n flaky.

ResIpsa

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 57
  • Procrastinatrix Extraordinaire
    • View Profile
The Terrorist Attack On America
« Reply #15 on: December 18, 2005, 01:19:23 PM »

In the horoscope of the United States, Pluto, as it moves through Sagittarius, is crossing the Ascendant of the chart, reflecting a profound transformation on many levels. This aspect has never occurred before in America's history, and therefore it is of the greatest importance. Most likely to be affected is the country's own image of itself, reflected not only in how America presents itself to other nations, but in the myths, dreams, ideals and social expectations which are expressed at home.

The independent, freedom-loving, expansive, truth-seeking qualities of Sagittarius are evident in the American myth, style, and self-image, and it is this particular image which is likely to be transformed over the time of the Millennium and afterward. There may be some loss of naivety, and some serious questioning of previously held moral and religious assumptions; but at the same time there is also likely to be an increased desire to understand human motivation, and a strong wish to eradicate all those negative internal influences which thwart human rights and dampen hope. This could mean an increase of religious intensity in some quarters. Religious, legal and moral issues are likely to be the source of many conflicts and many creative resolutions over this time.

The long transit of Pluto is likely to be reflected in much soul-searching and moral and religious questioning, some of it perhaps excessive, but all of it underpinned by a profound collective need to build sounder spiritual and ethical foundations. The subtle influence of Neptune moving through Aquarius could help this process to achieve a creative result because it may remind Americans of their unity with other peoples and other nations, not least through shared material and financial resources; and this could help to offset any intolerance set in motion by Pluto's intense quest for truth.

Likewise Uranus in Aquarius and Pisces, passing over the Moon in the American chart, may awaken public consciousness of the wider world, and stimulate a desire for greater tolerance and humanitarian concern as well as inspiring new technological and scientific discoveries.

Liz Greene, 1999


The chart of the event

Like many charts for the inception of war, the chart set for the collision of the first hijacked aircraft with the World Trade Centre building contains a deceptively benign aspect. There is a powerful and apparently harmonious configuration between the planets Mercury, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.[2] It is not my intention to discuss the horary or predictive implications of this chart - other astrologers who specialise in these perspectives have already done this elsewhere - but rather, the deeper picture it portrays of the collective psyche at the moment of the attack. Like the similar benign configuration in the inception chart for World War Two,[3] this set-up of planets is telling us something we may not wish to recognise: it is easy for such events to occur when the collective psyche floats in a state of complacency and unawareness. Such planetary configurations are aspects of ease and reflect gifts and innate aptitudes in an individual's chart, but they can also connote a naive assumption that all is well in the world. It is the 'difficult' or 'inharmonious' aspects[4] which force us to become conscious and work at containing our conflicts and developing our potentials. This chart contains a striking juxtaposition of both types of aspect - a grand trine and a T-cross. It is characteristic, when this occurs in an individual's chart, for the trines to dominate initially, and the hard aspects to register through a crisis of some kind which forces the person to face painful realities they would prefer to avoid. This planetary alignment is in the astrological element of air - concerned with ideas, ideals, and concepts - and perhaps reflects the dangerously self-satisfied idealism with which we in the Western world began the week of 9th September. The dominance of political correctness over human reality, and the belief that it can solve the world's problems, may be one of many things which has just come to an abrupt end.

Other aspects in this chart are aggressive and potentially very destructive. Treated with consciousness in an individual's chart, they can be productive of extremely positive results. When they appear as the signature of the climate of the moment, they can be explosive.[5] The aspects of 11th September portray this event as being rooted in ideological conflicts, the underlying drumbeat being the fanaticism and intolerance which have yearly been on the increase in every nation of the world.[6] The focus of the tension is the sphere of the horoscope concerned with ancestral ghosts, inheritance from the past, traditionally the house of 'secret enemies'.[7] From a psychological perspective, this area of the birth chart is concerned with patterns in the collective unconscious which stretch back over many generations. In short, this explosive configuration of hard aspects describes the fruition of issues of anger, aggression, scapegoating, and fanaticism which have their roots in a much longer past.

I do not believe it is possible to take the chart for an event, or the transits over a national chart, and foretell what will 'happen' in concrete terms. Sometimes a transit picture over a national chart is highly suggestive when linked with knowledge of political affairs, as was the case with the Soviet Union in 1989.[8] But the configurations here are not that obvious. Threatening and disturbing, yes; clear and simple, no. Many people are now proudly declaring, with hindsight, how easy it is to read the events of 11 September in this chart, and in the transits across the chart of the USA, discussed below. This is a facile pronouncement. So are the various prognostications of the End of the World, which have been around for as long as the world has. Claiming to have such foreknowledge may give a feeling of personal power and importance, but it might be more constructive - and truthful - to admit not only our ignorance but also our need to look objectively at many different levels and perspectives to try to make sense of the catastrophe which has just occurred and steer our way to a future which is constructive rather than destructive. If we believe there is any possibility of free will and any capacity to work on difficult configurations to generate creative rather than destructive results, we must accept the fact that the terrorist attack on America was not 'fated'.

It is also pointless to declare how it could have been avoided if so-and-so had done or not done such-and-such. There are too many 'if only's being thrown about, and perhaps also too many smug declarations of blame in every direction, including self-blame. This is not helpful and is rather like telling someone with cancer that it's their 'fault' because they didn't sort out their psychological problems or ate the wrong food ten years before. We need to look at the meaning of these events first, and then look forward to how we can turn a great evil into an opportunity for bettering things. Of course America has a psychological 'shadow'. So does every other nation in the world. At some point it may be appropriate to explore the nature of that shadow. But just as no amount of self-analysis can protect an individual from the unexpected, no amount of self-analysis can protect a nation from the unexpected either. Those who assume that terrorist acts are the inevitable 'result' of a nation's failings are, in effect, attributing logic, fairness, and justice to people who abandoned logic, justice, and fairness long ago.

Whether in an individual's, a nation's, or an event's chart, the contrast between a benign configuration reflecting lofty and noble humanitarian ideals, and a stressful configuration reflecting elements of scapegoating, aggression, obsessive fanaticism, and potential violence born of impotent rage is striking.[9] Benign configurations in a birth chart often hide a multitude of sins. Psychologically, we tend to hide behind our gifts and aptitudes to avoid the pain of dealing with our limitations and conflicts. It could be said that the collective - globally, and not just in America - was in precisely this state of hopeful denial of reality on the morning of 11th September.

_____________________________ _____________________________ _____________________________ ________

Liz Greene, is one of the most remarkable astrologers of our time.



As a qualified Jungian analyst, Liz Greene's work has successfully combined Jung's theories with astrology. She is a highly successful author with number of classic astrology titles, profound personal Psychological reports and an instructive astrology video. Liz Greene is also director of the Centre for Psychological Astrology and a patron of the Faculty of Astrological Studies, both based in London and runs seminars around the world.


what kind of fuckery is this?

toofuckincold

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Re: Talismans and Spells For Law Students
« Reply #16 on: December 18, 2005, 08:30:00 PM »
Quote
[...] The first rule of the New Age: When it doubt, it comes from the Vedas. Viewed by many as an extremely useful tool, organizations such as Scotland Yard and the French police currently use palmistry and the study of hands for detecting criminals. [...]

Intelligence agencies do a lot of this crazy stuff!

The rationale appears to be that fear is a weapon just a rifle or a tank is; if you frighten your enemy enough, you may defeat him without having to fight. In full-fledged wars and quiet covert operations around the world, U.S. military and intelligence specialists have long practiced intimidation through propaganda. Some of the most productive (and some of the most fanciful) psywar operations have sought to exploit ideas about the supernatural.

Many early U.S. psywar operations were conceived by a famous clandestine commander, Air Force Brigadier General Edward G. Lansdale (1909-1987). A firm believer in the efficacy of "psychological operations" (or PSYOP, for short -- the military's term for propaganda), Lansdale was a pioneering psywarrior. Lansdale believed that the key asset of the psychological combatant is a thorough understanding of the target audience's beliefs and values. The mores and myths that shape a society's culture, he argued, must be exploited if a psywar campaign is to be effective. Lansdale applied his strategy ruthlessly in the Philippines, where he served as the CIA's chief operative during the early 1950s counterinsurgency campaign against the country's Huk rebels.

"To the superstitious, the Huk battleground was a haunted place filled with ghosts and eerie creatures," Lansdale later wrote. One of his favorite psywar stunts "played upon the popular dread of asuang, or vampire" to drive the guerrillas from Huk-held territory. "A combat psywar squad was brought in. It planted stories among town residents of an asuang living on the hill where the Huks were based. Two nights later, after giving the stories time to make their way up to the hill camp, the psywar squad set up an ambush along the trail used by the Huks. When a Huk patrol came along the trail, the ambushers silently snatched the last man of the patrol, their move unseen in the dark night. They punctured his neck with two holes, vampire-fashion, held the body up by the heels, drained it of blood, and put the corpse back on the trail. When the Huks returned to look for the missing man and found their bloodless comrade, every member of the patrol believed that the asuang had got him and that one of them would be next if they remained on that hill. When daylight came, the whole Huk squadron moved out of the vicinity."

Another of Lansdale's spooky counterinsurgency tricks was what he called the "eye of God technique," wherein government troops, using information gathered from counterintelligence efforts, called out the names of Huk guerrillas over loudspeakers and threatened the rebels with death if they did not surrender. Lansdale devised a related scheme to intimidate civilians, using "all-seeing eye" graffiti to threaten constant surveillance. He later wrote: "[the method] was especially useful in towns where some of the inhabitants were known to be helping the Huks secretly. The army would warn these people that they were under suspicion. At night, when the town was asleep, a psywar team would creep into town and paint an eye on a wall facing the house of each suspect. The mysterious presence of these malevolent eyes the next morning had a sharply sobering effect."

After helping suppress rebellion in the Philippines, in 1954 Lansdale was sent to Vietnam, where he directed covert operations for the Saigon Military Mission (SMM), a small team of U.S. military and intelligence operatives. In 1955, the SMM hired North Vietnamese astrologers "to write predictions about coming disasters to certain Vietminh leaders and undertakings, and to predict unity in the south," according to Lansdale. This operation, he reported, was "based on our concept of the use of astrology for psywar in Southeast Asia." Because of his work in the Philippines and Vietnam, Lansdale was regarded as the government's chief expert on suppressing incipient revolutions. In 1962, President Kennedy tasked Lansdale with designing Operation Mongoose, a secret campaign to undermine Cuba's firmly established revolutionary government.

Lansdale made extensive provisions for anti-Castro propaganda in his Mongoose plans; his top secret planning documents, now declassified, detail the use of "all media" in the campaign. Many of Lansdale's propaganda initiatives relied on the tried-and-true techniques of clandestine radio warfare, but some of his more grandiose psywar schemes approached the surreal. For instance, he proposed a campaign to convince Cubans that Fidel Castro was in fact the anti-Christ, and to then spark a revolt by staging Jesus' return from the heavens. Lansdale's plan, which his colleagues dubbed "elimination by illumination," was to simulate the holy event by firing phosphorous shells into the sky above Havana. Though the anti-Castro/anti-Christ plan never came to fruition, the fact that it was considered at all by a U.S. military official is another indication of the important role supernatural themes can take in covert operations.

Another foreign hotspot that caught the attention of U.S. national security planners during the 1960s was the Republic of the Congo. The CIA and Defense Department deemed the country a test case for modern counterinsurgency methods, and financed numerous studies of Congolese society to probe the psychological strengths and weaknesses of the rebels. In 1964, the U.S. Army commissioned one of the most extraordinary strategy papers ever produced in the history of unconventional warfare. Titled "Witchcraft, Sorcery, Magic, and Other Psychological Phenomena, and Their Implications on Military and Paramilitary Operations in the Congo," the report is a treatise on paranormal combat, discussing "counter-magic" tactics to suppress rebels who are backed by witch-doctors, charms, and magic potions.

The supernatural warfare report was authored by James R. Price and Paul Jureidini, two analysts at the Special Operations Research Office (SORO) at American University in Washington, D.C. As a center for military-sponsored research on the human dimension of counterinsurgency, SORO cranked out reports profiling the politics and other social forces at play in countries that concerned the Pentagon. In 1964 SORO also designed the infamous Project Camelot, a planned effort to scientifically measure the social factors that work to stabilize and destabilize developing countries. When news about Project Camelot seeped into countries that were proposed as targets for study, international protests erupted and the project was shut down. Critics called Project Camelot an egregious case of "sociological snooping," and SORO's report on supernatural subversives in the Congo merits the same classification.

IQT

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: Talismans and Spells For Law Students
« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2005, 03:21:23 AM »
Quote
[...] It is also pointless to declare how it could have been avoided if so-and-so had done or not done such-and-such. There are too many 'if only's being thrown about, and perhaps also too many smug declarations of blame in every direction, including self-blame. This is not helpful and is rather like telling someone with cancer that it's their 'fault' because they didn't sort out their psychological problems or ate the wrong food ten years before. We need to look at the meaning of these events first, and then look forward to how we can turn a great evil into an opportunity for bettering things. Of course America has a psychological 'shadow'. So does every other nation in the world. At some point it may be appropriate to explore the nature of that shadow. But just as no amount of self-analysis can protect an individual from the unexpected, no amount of self-analysis can protect a nation from the unexpected either. THOSE WHO ASSUME THAT TERRORIST ACTS ARE THE INEVITABLE 'RESULT' OF A NATION'S FAILINGS ARE, IN EFFECT, ATTRIBUTING LOGIC, FAIRNESS, AND JUSTICE TO PEOPLE WHO ABANDONED LOGIC, JUSTICE, AND FAIRNESS LONG AGO. [...]

This is simply beautiful!

ecce

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 10
    • View Profile
Re: Talismans and Spells For Law Students
« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2005, 06:41:23 AM »
LOL Amelia!


ecce

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 10
    • View Profile
Re: Talismans and Spells For Law Students
« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2005, 08:15:15 AM »
Quote
[...] The first rule of the New Age: When it doubt, it comes from the Vedas. Viewed by many as an extremely useful tool, organizations such as Scotland Yard and the French police currently use palmistry and the study of hands for detecting criminals. [...]

Intelligence agencies do a lot of this crazy stuff!

The rationale appears to be that fear is a weapon just a rifle or a tank is; if you frighten your enemy enough, you may defeat him without having to fight. In full-fledged wars and quiet covert operations around the world, U.S. military and intelligence specialists have long practiced intimidation through propaganda. Some of the most productive (and some of the most fanciful) psywar operations have sought to exploit ideas about the supernatural.

[...]


Using fear or force to manipulate or coerce people into doing what you want them to do should not be considered some kind of sophisticated "mind control". Inquisitions do not succeed in capturing the minds of their victims. As soon as the threat of punishment is lifted, the extorted beliefs vanish. You do not control the mind of someone who will escape from you the moment you turn your back.

To render a woman helpless by drugs so you can rape her is not mind control. Using a frequency generator to give people headaches or to disorient them is not the same as controlling them. You do not have control over a person's thoughts or actions just because you can do what you want to them or render them incapable of doing as they will. An essential component of mind control is that it involves controlling another person, not just putting them out of control or doing things to them over which they have no control.

Some of the more popular misconceptions of mind control originated in fiction, such as "The Manchurian Candidate." In that film, an assassin is programmed so that he will respond to a post-hypnotic trigger, commit a murder, and not remember it later. Other books and films portray hypnosis as a powerful tool, allowing the hypnotist to have his sexual way with beautiful women or to program her to become a robotic courier, assassin, etc. Other fictional fantasies have been created that show drugs or electronic devices, including brain implants, being used to control the behavior of people. It has, of course, been established that brain damage, hypnosis, drugs or electric stimulation to the brain or neural network can have a causal effect on thought, bodily movement, and behavior. However, the state of human knowledge on the effects of various chemical or electrical stimulation to the brain is so impoverished that it would be impossible using today's knowledge and technology to do anything approaching the kind of mind control accomplished in fantasy. We can do things that are predictable, such as cause loss of a specific memory or arousal of a specific desire, but we cannot do this in a way which is non-intrusive or which would have the significance of being able to control a large array of thoughts, movements, or actions. It is certainly conceivable that some day we may be able to build a device which, if implanted in the brain, would allow us to control thoughts and actions by controlling specific chemical or electrical stimuli. Such a device does not now exist nor could it exist given today's state of knowledge in the neurosciences.

There also seems to be a growing belief that the U.S. government, through its military branches or agencies such as the CIA, is using a number of horrible devices aimed at disrupting the brain. Laser weapons, isotropic radiators, infrasound, non-nuclear electromagnetic pulse generators, and high-power microwave emitters have been mentioned. It is known that government agencies have experimented on humans in mind control studies with and without the knowledge of their subjects (Scheflin 1978). The claims of those who believe they have been unwilling victims of "mind control" experiments should not be dismissed as impossible or even as improbable. Given past practice and the amoral nature of our military and intelligence agencies, such experiments are not implausible. However, these experimental weapons, which are aimed at disrupting brain processes, should not be considered mind control weapons. To confuse, disorient or otherwise debilitate a person through chemicals or electronically, is not to control that person. To make a person lose control of himself is not the same as gaining control over him. It is a near certainty that our government is not capable of controlling anyone's mind, though it is clear that many people in many governments lust after such power.

In any case, some of the claims made by those who believe they are being controlled by these electronic weapons do not seem plausible. For example, the belief that radio waves or microwaves can be used to cause a person to hear voices transmitted to him seems unlikely. We know that radio waves and waves of all kinds of frequencies are constantly going through our bodies. The reason we have to turn on the radio or TV to hear the sounds or see the pictures being transmitted through the air is because those devices have receivers which "translate" the waves into forms we can hear and see. What we know about hearing and vision makes it very unlikely that simply sending a signal to the brain that can be "translated" into sounds or pictures would cause a person to hear or see anything. Someday it may be possible to stimulate electronically or chemically a specific network of neurons to cause specific sounds or sights of the experimenter's choosing to emerge in a person's consciousness. But this is not possible today. Even if it were possible, it would not necessarily follow that a person would obey a command to assassinate the president just because he heard a voice telling him to do so. Hearing voices is one thing. Feeling compelled to obey them is quite another. Not everyone has the faith of Abraham.

There seem to be a number of parallels between those who think they have been abducted by aliens and those who believe their minds are being controlled by CIA implants. So far, however, the "mind-controlled group" has not been able to find their John Mack, the Harvard psychiatrist who claims that the best explanation for alien abduction claims is that they are based on alien abduction experiences, not fantasies or delusions. A common complaint from the mind-controlled is that they can't get therapists to take them seriously. That is,  they say they can only find therapists who want to treat them for their delusions, not help them prove they're being controlled by their government. Thus, it is not likely that the "mind-controlled CIA zombies" will be accused of having delusions planted in them by therapists, as alien abductees have, since they claim they cannot get therapists to take their delusions seriously. In fact, many of them are convinced that their treatment as deluded persons is part of a conspiracy to cover-up the mind control experiments done on them. Some even believe that False Memory Syndrome is part of the conspiracy. They claim that the idea of false memories is a plot to keep people from taking seriously the claims of those who are now remembering that they were victims of mind control experiments at some time in the past. It is hard to believe that they cannot find a wide array of incompetent New Age therapists willing to take their claims seriously, if not willing to claim they have been victims of such experiments themselves.