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Author Topic: Student Business Cards  (Read 6292 times)

margee

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Re: Student Business Cards
« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2005, 11:12:22 AM »
It's not unprecedented for people to have cards that aren't from their employer.  They used to be called calling cards, and the idea is getting to be pretty popular again.  I know lots of people that have personal "business cards," and I find them to be very helpful. 

For example, I was talking to my hair dresser the other day, and he suggested that I call him regarding whatever we were talking about.  His personal numbers aren't on his business card, so he whips out his personal card.  Very handy for him and for me.  No rummaging for a pen required.

I agree that they must be used properly - only give when asked.

I also think it's a great idea to use the back.  The mini resume is tricky, though, I've seen several that have TMI.  Less is more.

Ajude

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Re: Student Business Cards
« Reply #11 on: November 02, 2005, 12:35:12 PM »
The OP asked for input from law students and attorneys.  I appreciate the fact that law students who are offering advice may have different opinions.  I am an attorney and I would honestly think that a law student who had a "business card" was desparate and ridiculous.  If I meet you at an event and you want to follow up with me, giving me your card is not going to help unless I want to follow up with you as well.  If I want to follow up with you, I will give you my card.  I cannot remember ever being in a situation where I wanted to get a person's contact information but was thwarted (or even inconvenienced) by the lack of a pen.  I certainly would not think any better of a person who had a business card.

RoniDeutch

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Re: Student Business Cards
« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2005, 12:46:20 PM »
i agree with ajude. my law school offers them and they are tacky. they make you appear to be a "networking whore". picture this...you are at a fancy party with numerous attys. you strike up a very stimulating and meaningful conversation with one of them. at the conclusion of the exchange, he/she asks if they can have your email/phone number, so you can talk again sometime. well...."have no fear...i have a business card on my person for times like this!!". it makes you look like you engage in conversations with people, in order to use them for any profesional benefits they can offer you. its like constantly carrying around condoms in your pocket. people think you just want to walk around and get laid.

margee

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Re: Student Business Cards
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2005, 01:04:13 PM »
I agree to a certain extent with Ajude and RoniDeutch (way to straddle the fence, hun?)

They must be used VERY judiciously.  There are definitley places/times where using them will make you look like a pretentious dork.  There are also times when they will be seen in a very positive light.  You have to know your audience and environment.  I would say that it probably varies by city and even within cities.  Certain groups of people will approve.  Others won't.

jacy85

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Re: Student Business Cards
« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2005, 01:09:52 PM »
Assuming that someone is going to just whip out a personal/business card at every possible moment is ridculous and unrealistic.

However, someone who does request your contact info will be much more likely to hang on to a business card then some random scrap of paper or a napkin with your email address on it, aside from the fact that its just more convenient.

I don't think anyone is suggesting handing them out like candy at Halloween, contrary to what Ajude and Roni seem to think.

RoniDeutch

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Re: Student Business Cards
« Reply #15 on: November 02, 2005, 01:36:45 PM »
hand them out like candy??? my scenario of being at a swanky atty party makes it very clear that its not the QUANTITY of cards handed out, but the rude and IMPERSONAL connotation it gives. if someone im interested in hands me a napkin or scrap of paper with their info on it i hang on to it and then transcribe it in to my cell phone or personal planner. if someone handed my their personal business card, i would think they are pathetic and desperate. do you hand out business cards to prospective paramours? lets imagine meeting someone of romantic interest in a public place. would you hand our your business card with all your personal attributes that you would make a good romantic partner? its very contrived and impersonal.

jacy85

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Re: Student Business Cards
« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2005, 03:05:35 PM »
I hope you don't really compare business/networking contacts in the same way you do possible romantic partners.  That could lead to some really embarassing situations at the office.
 
And how does a business card with your name, phone number, and email = information about your personal attributes that make you a good romantic partner/employee/etc.??

If you're referring to putting a little "resume" on the back, I concur, that's just ridiculous and very contrived. pointless.

But handing someone a card with your contact information as opposed to a hastily scribbled-on napkin is just more professional.  A potential business contact is in no way comparable to a potential paramour.  Why would you get so offended by someone using a widely accepted (and often expected) business practice for giving someone your contact information?

If you judge someone for that as being "pathetic and desperate" then you are truly pathetic and desparate yourself, finding whatever reason possible to make yourself feel superior to others.

Ajude

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Re: Student Business Cards
« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2005, 03:37:11 PM »
Jacy, to say that it is a widely accepted (and often expected) practice for law students to hand out "business cards" is simply false.  If you are saying that it is widely accepted in other contexts, then the comment is irrelevant. 

However, networking is largely about confidence and if having a business card makes you feel more confident, then by all means, use a business card.  My comment is merely that nobody will think less of you or think that you are less "professional" if you do not have a business card.           

dft

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Re: Student Business Cards
« Reply #18 on: November 02, 2005, 05:08:41 PM »
I don't know if anyone else has said this, but in reponse to AJude:

1) What are you doing on this board if you're an attorney? Nothing against you, it's just a bit strange. And,

2) While your perspective MAY be more valuable because you are a practicing attorney, your opinion alone does not establish conclusively that all practicing lawyers see no value in a law student having business cards. There very well may be many (or at least some) practicing lawyers who think it's valuable and/or practical.

Not that I completely disagree with you -- I'm not quite sure. I just felt like making those points.

The OP asked for input from law students and attorneys.  I appreciate the fact that law students who are offering advice may have different opinions.  I am an attorney and I would honestly think that a law student who had a "business card" was desparate and ridiculous.  If I meet you at an event and you want to follow up with me, giving me your card is not going to help unless I want to follow up with you as well.  If I want to follow up with you, I will give you my card.  I cannot remember ever being in a situation where I wanted to get a person's contact information but was thwarted (or even inconvenienced) by the lack of a pen.  I certainly would not think any better of a person who had a business card.

dft

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Re: Student Business Cards
« Reply #19 on: November 02, 2005, 05:09:53 PM »
i think you also have a point.

i agree with ajude. my law school offers them and they are tacky. they make you appear to be a "networking whore". picture this...you are at a fancy party with numerous attys. you strike up a very stimulating and meaningful conversation with one of them. at the conclusion of the exchange, he/she asks if they can have your email/phone number, so you can talk again sometime. well...."have no fear...i have a business card on my person for times like this!!". it makes you look like you engage in conversations with people, in order to use them for any profesional benefits they can offer you. its like constantly carrying around condoms in your pocket. people think you just want to walk around and get laid.