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Author Topic: mnemonics for law school  (Read 15147 times)

chaser

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Re: mnemonics for law school
« Reply #20 on: October 11, 2005, 08:28:32 PM »
Defenses to Intentional Torts:

"NAPS in the CONDO PREVENT CRIME..."

Necessity
Authority, legal
Property: Defense of, Recovery of
Self, defense of

CON= Consent
DO= Defense of others

PREVENT CRIME= Prevention of crime.
"Civilization is the process of reducing the infinite to the finite."  Oliver Wendell Holmes

lipper

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Re: mnemonics for law school
« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2005, 12:19:31 AM »
HELUVA for adverse possession

Hostile
E
Lasting
Uninterupted
Visible
A

I forget the E and A. kind of defeats the purpose.
check the footnotes ya'll

JonR0921

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Re: mnemonics for law school
« Reply #22 on: October 12, 2005, 06:11:57 AM »
HELUVA for adverse possession

Hostile
E
Lasting
Uninterupted
Visible
A

I forget the E and A. kind of defeats the purpose.

The E and the A stand for Exclusive and Adverse, respectively.  The rest of the acronym troubles me, however.  The terms that represent the adverse possession elements (Actual, Exclusive, Continuous, Hostile, Open/Notorious) are terms of art, and thus are words that profs specifically look for on exams.  I use "A ECHO" to remember the elements.

lipper

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Re: mnemonics for law school
« Reply #23 on: October 12, 2005, 07:15:43 AM »
Hostile
Exclusive
Lasting
Uninterupted
Visible
Actual

If it troubles you then dont use it kid.
check the footnotes ya'll

dft

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Re: mnemonics for law school
« Reply #24 on: November 02, 2005, 03:26:52 PM »
Just lifted this one (copied and pasted) from RomLaw (a study aid). Haven't read this thread over recently to see if there's a similar one. Haven't read the mnemonic over to check if it's accurate either, but it looks good at first glance:

Four requirements must be met to reduce a killing from murder to manslaughter:

 C.    Causal connection (S.ubjective): There must be a causal connection between all three requirements infra. It is murder to kill an innocent bystander, but if this is done by accident in missing the initial provoker or is done by reasonable mistake, it is manslaughter.

 A.   Adequate provocation (O.bjective): There must be adequate provocation. To be recognized by law as adequate, it must deprive a reasonable person of self-control for the moment.

 S.   Sudden heat of passion (O.bjective): The killing must have been in the sudden heat of passion and must have occurred before there was a reasonable opportunity for the passion to cool. The majority determines this by the use of a reasonable person standard of a reasonable person suffering from similar afflictions. The minority ignores all afflictions.

 H.   Heat of passion (S.ubjective): The killing must have been in the heat of passion. The killing must have followed the provocation before the defendant had an opportunity to cool off. The defendant must have killed while his actions were directed by passion rather than by reason.

 C.A.S.H. S.O.O.S.

buggy

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Re: mnemonics for law school
« Reply #25 on: November 26, 2005, 05:06:24 PM »
Bump.

Jumboshrimps

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Trancer

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Re: mnemonics for law school
« Reply #27 on: November 28, 2005, 01:34:42 PM »
Enforcement Defenses -
Do Not Unplug Michael Moores Microphone Unless Pressured
Duress
Nondisclosure
Undue Influence
Minor Incapacity
Mental Incapacity
Misrepresentation
Unconscionability
Public Policy

Justification of Nonperformance -
Magic Mushrooms Can Increase Interesting Feeling of Pain
Mistake
Modification
Changed Circumstance
Impossibility
Impracticality
Frustration of Purpose
Its not the size of the army that counts, its the fury of the onslaught.
Seton Hall, August 05

jennifermassey

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Re: mnemonics for law school
« Reply #28 on: November 28, 2005, 02:53:15 PM »
Enforcement Defenses -
Do Not Unplug Michael Moores Microphone Unless Pressured
Duress
Nondisclosure
Undue Influence
Minor Incapacity
Mental Incapacity
Misrepresentation
Unconscionability
Public Policy
Are the enforcement defenses used for arguing that there is no K formed? Or are they used to argue against a particular element of K (i.e.:  offer, acceptance, consideration)?

Trancer

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Re: mnemonics for law school
« Reply #29 on: November 28, 2005, 05:37:04 PM »
They are used to make a contract unenforceable... i simply call them defeat doctrines... they can be applied in many circumstances to make a contract unenforceable
Its not the size of the army that counts, its the fury of the onslaught.
Seton Hall, August 05