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Author Topic: What else can you do with a law degree if you do NOT want to practice law?  (Read 1996 times)

Not Given

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I knew going into law school that I did not want to litigate however I am interested in doing transactional work. I would like to work the 8-5 or 9-5/6 hours with a pretty decent salary and benefits. 

I would like to find out what options will one have when they graduate and pass the bar exam? (options that do not include going to trail...or even going to court unless it is only to file documents w/the court). Im thinking government work..but what areas? 

Any suggestions would be helpful.

jacy85

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Most attorneys never see the inside of a courtroom, so asking for info on what to do that doesn't involved litigating is a huge question.

Your best bet would be to hit your office of career services.  They can give you some good info that will probably (hopefully?) be more complete than you'd get here, or they can point you in the direction of a good source.  I'm not sure what your school does in terms of mentors and everything, but maybe they can help you get in touch with an alum in the area who practices in an area you're interested in.

lipper

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tax, real estate, trusts and estates, wills, u name it, there is transactional work to be done. However, most, if not all areas involve the potential for litigation.
check the footnotes ya'll

tacojohn

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Practicing law is not just litigating.  If you're a transactional lawyer, you are practicing law.  The vast majority of jobs in the law are not focused on litigation.  So you will have options.

But you also haven't been trained in oral advocacy or had an oppertunity to try a case.  There's plenty of things you could do if you don't want to litigate, but I wouldn't write it off until you go through at least some of the training you get in law school.

sarbinson1

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I knew going into law school that I did not want to litigate however I am interested in doing transactional work. I would like to work the 8-5 or 9-5/6 hours with a pretty decent salary and benefits. 

I would like to find out what options will one have when they graduate and pass the bar exam? (options that do not include going to trail...or even going to court unless it is only to file documents w/the court). Im thinking government work..but what areas? 

Any suggestions would be helpful.

If you find a gig where you're only working that many hours, please let us know... even if it's much less money, it's worth it for the lifestyle.

Ajude

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Just to be clear, if you are thinking about government work, you are not thinking about transactional work.  The government does not do transactional work, it does regulatory and administrative work.

Not Given

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Yes I am aware that there is a difference between a transactional attorney and an atty that does gov. work.  Those were two of the possiblities that I thought were available to someone like me.  Transactional Atty.  and Gov. Atty.  I wanted to find out what these attys actually do and I wanted to know if there were more possiblities out there other than these two.

Wild Jack Maverick

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ah, the trick question: There are three branches of government. What is the fourth branch? (answer: Administrative Agencies)
http://www.whitehouse.gov/government/independent-agencies.html

Here is an opportunity for someone who really serious about law....
http://www.usdoj.gov/osg/opportunities/opportunities.html
"I enjoy being in school. I've learned so much already, with taking economics and law, and I have marketing and statistics coming up next."

dcbargirl

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Good luck finding a firm that lets you do transactional work 9-5. It will be pretty tough to find someplace that will let you get away with billing 1500-1600 hours a year.

jacy85

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Too bad that the majority of decent in house positions go to attorneys who have a decent amount of experience and have "paid their dues" by dealing with minimum billables for at least a few years.